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Found 44 Resources

Alvin Langdon Coburn

National Portrait Gallery

Henry James

National Portrait Gallery

Jacob Epstein

National Portrait Gallery

Wyndham Lewis

National Portrait Gallery

Men of Mark

National Portrait Gallery

Igor Stravinsky

National Portrait Gallery

Joseph Leon Edel

National Portrait Gallery

Alfred Stieglitz

National Portrait Gallery
The charismatic photographer Alfred Stieglitz dominated developments in American photography and art in the first fifteen years of the twentieth century. A superb craftsman himself, Stieglitz led the fight to win recognition for photography as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. In 1902 he established the Photo Secession, an association for art photographers, and opened a gallery at 291 Fifth Avenue in New York City. He also launched the journal Camera Work, where this photogravure by a promising young Photo Secession associate, Alvin Langdon Coburn, appeared in 1908. Stieglitz's 291 Gallery, a showcase for pictorialist photography as well as the most innovative European and American art, became the spiritual center of the avant-garde before World War I. At 291 and his later gallery, the Intimate Gallery, Stieglitz encouraged innovation among American artists and photographers.

Edward Carpenter

National Portrait Gallery

Henry James

National Portrait Gallery

Frank Brangwyn

National Portrait Gallery

George Moore

National Portrait Gallery

John Masefield

National Portrait Gallery

Henri Matisse

National Portrait Gallery

Arthur Symons

National Portrait Gallery

Max Weber

National Portrait Gallery

John Galsworthy

National Portrait Gallery

George Meredith

National Portrait Gallery

Andrew Lang

National Portrait Gallery

Max Beerbohm

National Portrait Gallery

Ezra Loomis Pound

National Portrait Gallery
If Ezra Pound was America's most original and influential modern poet, he was also its most controversial. Living primarily in Europe, the prodigiously energetic Pound promoted innovation as a critic and editor, serving as friend and adviser to such writers as T. S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, James Joyce, and Ernest Hemingway, as well as to photographer Alvin Langdon Coburn. By the 1920s, Pound's experimental verse and critical essays helped revolutionize western poetry. His most ambitious work was the Cantos, an epic series of lyrical poems that he began to publish in the 1920s and on which he labored all his life. Pound's virulent anti-Semitism, support of fascism, and mental instability ultimately clouded his reputation. But Coburn, who photographed Pound in London for his 1913 book Men of Mark, portrayed the passionate intellectual who inspired and influenced so many.

John Singer Sargent

National Portrait Gallery

Frederic Herbert Trench

National Portrait Gallery

James Matthew Barrie

National Portrait Gallery
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