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Found 4,018 Resources

airplane

National Museum of American History

airplane

National Museum of American History

Airplane

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Airplane

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Airplane

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Airplane

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Circular, with notched gilded border and in the center a scene showing a stylized airplane flown by a young man and woman, a red flying carpet, a couple dressed in medieval costume, a chained ogre, caged birds

Airplane model

National Museum of the American Indian

Airplane Whirligig

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Airplane model

National Museum of the American Indian

Jefferson Airplane Rock Concert

National Museum of American History

Conran's: Airplane

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Multicolor abstract design of beach with airplane towing "Conran's" sign.

Jefferson Airplane

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster featuring psychedelic yellow and purple design on brown ground. Images of Jefferson Airplane band members framed in circles and a square with engulfing spheres with text: BILL GRAHAM PRESENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO / JEFFERSON AIRPLANE [additional information, date, location].

Jefferson Airplane

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Mostly red poster depicting melted abstract shapes, biomorpic lettering: BILL GRAHAM PRESENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO / OCT 24 25 26; THURS / FRI SAT; JEFFERSON / AIRPLANE; RECORDING LIVE / BALLET AFRO-HAITI / AB. SKHY / TICKETS [ticket information in lower margin]. At center, an airplane with a woman upper body, centaur-motorcycles.

Airplane Harmonica

National Museum of American History
This harmonica was made by an undetermined maker in Japan, undetermined date. It is in the shape of an airplane, with 2 single holes and 1 reed.

The Airplane

Smithsonian American Art Museum

"America" Airplane

National Museum of American History

AIrplane Sculpture

Anacostia Community Museum

Toy Airplane

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"America" Airplane

National Museum of American History

"America" Airplane

National Museum of American History

Jefferson Airplane

National Portrait Gallery
Even the name seemed psychedelic. Jefferson Airplane was one of the first rock bands to fully capture the counterculture of the mid-1960s, quickly gaining national and then international fame. This 1966 poster featured a photograph of the band with its new lead vocalist, Grace Slick (born 1939). Jefferson Airplane’s irreverent lyrics—with references to sex, drugs, and radical politics—pulsating sound, and Slick’s soaring contralto and dramatic stage presence, launched the band into the national consciousness. The psychedelic posters commissioned by rock impresario Bill Graham for San Francisco’s Fillmore Auditorium suggest the dizzying, multisensory experience of many Fillmore events, which were often charged with high-decibel music, light shows, and mind-altering drugs. Although the wild lettering and colors that designer Wes Wilson used rendered the advertisement almost illegible, this innovative style successfully evoked the burgeoning hippie counterculture.

Airplane Anatomy

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online activity in which students help Wilbur and Orville Wright design the 1903 Flyer. They learn that this first airplane had most of the same essential parts as a modern plane.

Jefferson Airplane

National Portrait Gallery
Rock promoter Bill Graham helped guide the Jefferson Airplane band to success in the vanguard of the country's anti-establishment hippie revolution. This advertisement for their 1967 concert at Graham's Fillmore Auditorium has all the elements of the classic psychedelic poster: searing colors, portraits of the musicians, ambiguous hand-drawn elements, and swelling letters that dance before the viewer's eyes. Such advertisements suggested the dizzying, multisensory experience of many Fillmore dance concerts, which were charged with high-decibel music, light shows, frenetic movement, and, often, mind-expanding drugs. The posters, visual symbols of the rock scene and the counterculture, began to vanish as soon as they appeared, grabbed by increasing numbers of collectors. Graham and other publishers produced extra quantities for retail sale, and poster stores opened in all the major cities. "Posters in every dimension and description . . . are being plastered across the U.S.," Life magazine reported in 1967.

engine cylinder, airplane

National Museum of American History
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