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Music of the African Diaspora

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
In the past three decades, the USA has seen an influx of over one million African immigrants. Like Africans from earlier diasporas and like immigrants from elsewhere, they have brought their artistic skills, values, knowledge, and experience and created dynamic, often powerful new cultural forms that give definition to their communities in the USA. Highlights from the African Immigrant Program at the 1997 Smithsonian Folklife Festival illustrate the musical diversity and richness of the new African diaspora in the USA. [Catalog No. CFV10000; Copyright 2005 Smithsonian Institution]

Music of the African Diaspora

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
A higher resolution version of this video can be viewed at: http://www.folkways.si.edu/video/africa.aspx For more information on African music in the USA, please visit: http://www.folkways.si.edu/explore_folkways/african.aspx In the past three decades, the USA has seen an influx of over one million African immigrants. Like Africans from earlier diasporas and like immigrants from elsewhere, they have brought their artistic skills, values, knowledge, and experience and created dynamic, often powerful new cultural forms that give definition to their communities in the USA. Highlights from the African Immigrant Program at the 1997 Smithsonian Folklife Festival illustrate the musical diversity and richness of the new African diaspora in the US. A higher resolution version of this video can be viewed at: http://www.folkways.si.edu/video/africa.aspx The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time.

Picturing the Face of the African Diaspora

Smithsonian Magazine

"We are Africans not because we are born in Africa," says New York Times photographer Chester Higgins Jr., "but because Africa is born in us." For the past 30 years, Higgins has traveled the globe documenting the traditions, spirituality and dignity of people of African heritage.He has lived among and photographed Dogon dancers in Mali, Vodou practitioners in Haiti, Black Hebrews in Harlem and Yoruba worshipers in Brazil. Now some 270 of these images can be seen in two exhibitions sponsored by the Smithsonian's Center for African American History and Culture. "Feeling the Spirit: Searching the World for the People of Africa" and "Invoking the Spirit: Worship Traditions in the African World" are on view through March 23 in the South Gallery of the Arts and Industries Building.

"It's the people's characters themselves speaking through the film, through the lens, that tells the story," says Higgins. From the Sahel region of Senegal to the streets of Harlem, Higgins creates a compelling chronicle of the life and times of men and women of African descent.

Dread History: The African Diaspora, Ethiopianism, and Rastafari

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Discusses nationhood and pan-Africanism in the African Diaspora. Part of the Migrations in History online resource. Includes essay, glossary, image gallery, suggested further reading.

Music of the African Diaspora from the 1997 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
In the past three decades, the USA has seen an influx of over one million African immigrants. Like Africans from earlier diasporas and like immigrants from elsewhere, they have brought their artistic skills, values, knowledge, and experience and created dynamic, often powerful new cultural forms that give definition to their communities in the USA. Highlights from the African Immigrant Program at the 1997 Smithsonian Folklife Festival illustrate the musical diversity and richness of the new African diaspora in the USA.

Pinback button of the Pan-African flag

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round pin-back button featuring a red, black, and green stripe. Etched into metal on back is, [UNION/(illegible) AFL-CIO/SHOP].

Pinback button of the Pan-African flag

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round button featuring a red, black, and green stripe.

Pinback button for African Liberation Day

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pinback button for African Liberation Day. The back of the button has a yellow background and red lettering. A depiction of a statue is on the left side of the button. Red lettering on the right side of the button reads [May 26 African Liberation Day]. The exterior edge of the button has the manufacturer's information printed in red. The back of the button has a metal pin with a clasp.

Pinback button promoting the Sixth Pan African Congress

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round pin-back button featuring a yellow and black outline of Africa depicted with an anthropomorphous face. Green type set against a black border circles the outline. Green type reads, [PAN AFRICAN CONGRESS/SIXTH. Outermost border is yellow. Black type appears at bottom of button and reads, [DAR ES SALAAM].

Pinback button promoting All-African People's Revolutionary Party

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round pin-back button featuring black silhouette of Africa set against a white background. At the center of the Africa silhouette is white type that reads, [ONE/UNIFIED/SOCIALIST/AFRICA]. Black type circles the center image of Africa and reads, [ALL-AFRICAN PEOPLE'S/REVOLUTIONARY PARTY].

Pinback button promoting African Liberation Day

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round pin-back button with black silhouette image of Africa at center. Button has red type set against a yellow background. Type reads, [AFRICAN LIBERATION DAY/MAY 28, 1977/"THE CORE OF THE/BLACK REVOLUTION/IS IN AFRICA!"/ALL AFRICAN PEOPLES/REVOLUTIONARY PARTY].

Pinback button promoting African Liberation Day

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round pin-back button with green image of Africa set against a red background. Black type on front of button reads, [AFRICAN LIBERATION DAY/MAY 28, 1977/A-APRP].Round pin-back button with green image of Africa set against a red background. Black type on front of button reads, [AFRICAN LIBERATION DAY/MAY 28, 1977/A-APRP].

Flyer advertising the inaugural dance of the African-Haitian Association

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This flyer advertises a music concert and the inaugural dance of the African-Haitian Association. The flyer is white with black text and features photographs of each performer. The flyer reads [AFRICAN-HAITIAN ASSOCIATION / PRESENTS / their inaugural dance on easter / saturday march 29, 1975, 9 p.m. - 2.45 a.m. / MUSIC BY / LEO MENSAH & / E KOW BOTCHEY / KOBINA ADZENYAH / from GHANA / LES DIABLES DU RYTHE / THE IBO DANCERS / LEON DIMANCHE / TAKYI from AFRICA / show at 12 p.m.]. The back of the flyer is blank.

Flyer Advertising an African Dance and Show

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This flyer advertises an African dance and show organized by the Africa Students Social Club. The flyer is white with black text. [AFRICA STUDENTS SOCIAL CLUB / PRESENTS / AUTHENTIC AFRICAN DANCE AND SHOW / AT / HOTEL DIPLOMAT (ROOF TERRACE) / 108 WEST 43RD STREET / SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1969 / 9 P.M. - 3.A.M. / Music: "African Dashikis Band / Featuring Great Musicians From Africa / RESERVATION - $2.00 AT THE DOOR - - $3.50 / For Tickets and Information Please Call: / Nana Akwasi Talaji: 633-8455 / Atta Prempeh: 875-1962 / Yaw Baafi: 493-1183 / COME ONE - COME ALL]. The back of the flyer is blank except for a blue stamp that reads, [JUL 1969].

Flyer advertising an African Festival featuring Asuo Gyebi and Jbofoj Tegare

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This flyer advertises an African Festival featuring Asuo Gyebi and Jbofoj Tegare. The flyer is white with black text and features a photograph of a man dancing for a crowd. The flyer reads [AFRICAN FESTIVAL / ASUO GYEBI and JBOFOJ TEGARE / Performed by Chief Priest & Priestess / NANA ANUM TOPRA / NANA ANSAU ATEI / SUNDAY / MARCH 19th / featuring ISHANGI FAMILY / AFRICAN DANCE AND CULTURAL EXPERTS / PLACE NATIONAL BLACK THEATER -2:00 PM / 9 EAST 125 ST. AT 5th AVE FREE]. The back of the flyer is blank except for the text written in the bottom left corner that reads [MARCH / 1972].

Pinback buttons for an African Street Festival

National Museum of African American History and Culture
2013.68.6.1: A yellow pinback button with green and red lettering. The green letters are centered in the top perimeter of the button and read [African]. Directly below, black text reads [Street Festival]. Between the two words is a face. Below, in red ink, is the date [1990]. In the center of the button is an image of Nelson Mandela. Shown from the waist up, he stands with his right arm raised in the air. The lower part of his torso creates the form of the African continent. Below the image is a Zulu phrase in red ink that reads [Si Munye]. Beneath, in black text, is the English translation, [We Are One]. The back of the button has a pin with a clasp.

2013.68.6.2: A pinback white button with green and red lettering. The green letters are centered in the top perimeter of the button and read [African]. Directly below is black text that reads [Street Festival]. Between the two words is a face. Below, in red ink, is the date [1990]. In the center of the button is an image of Nelson Mandela. Shown from the waist up, he stands with his right arm raised in the air. The lower part of his torso creates the form of the African continent. Below the image is a Zulu phrase in red ink that reads [Si Munye]. Beneath, in black text, is the English translation, [We Are One]. The back of the button has a pin with a clasp.

Flyer advertising "Women and the African Revolution" program

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This flyer advertises a program entitled Women and the African Revolution at First Baptist Church of Crown Heights in New York. The flyer is white with blue text and features a drawing of Africa and an image of a person with a gun. The flyer reads: [WOMEN and the / AFRICAN / REVOLUTION / Sarudzai Churucheminzwa / ZIMBABWE AFRICAN NATIONAL UNION (ZANU) / FRIDAY, MARCH 5, 8:00 / FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF CROWN HEIGHTS / 450 Eastern Parkway (near Rogers Ave.) / Take IRT 2 to Nostrand Avenue / Ausp: Crown Heights Militant Forum / For more information, call 596-2849 / Donation: $1.00 (HS and unemployed .50)]. The back of the flyer is blank except for the text written on the left that reads [3-5-1976].

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a man and woman dressed in West African clothing standing together under an umbrella. The photograph is attached to a thick mounting board. The board is stamped on the back.

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a man and woman dressed in West African clothing standing together under an umbrella. The photograph is attached to a thick mounting board. The board is stamped on the back.

Pinback button promoting the Million Women March

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round pin-back button featuring graphic of four African American women wearing green and red dresses. Above the women is black, green, and red type that reads, [Million/Woman March/October 25th, 1997 Philadelphia/Benjamin Franklin Parkway].

El Amado de Afrodita, The Beloved of Aphrodite, El Ciruelo Oaxaca, Mexico

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of a man. He is wearing a torn light t-shirt with an image of Garfield the cat and some writing above. He is holding a key in his left hand and a stack of straw over his left shoulder. He has short curly hair and is looking to the right of the photographer.

Ceremonial Object

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This mixed media sculpture consists of an animal horn featuring twine wrapped around the wide end with colorful and iridescent rectangular shell beads hanging from the twine. The wide end of the horn is covered by cloth. The cloth is held in place by the twine. Hanging from the twine are six beaded strings consisting of brown, blue, red, and yellow glass beads and long, larger carved bone beads and skulls that culminate in a large ball made from corn husks, covered with a black paint and green powder pigment. The artist has signed the object in white "RENEE / STOUT 1990" as well as an artist's mark consisting of an "R" inside a square with a small "S" between the legs of the "R."

Pinback button for "Brothers supporting the Million Women's March"

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Round pin-back button featuring red, black, and green type. On the right and left side of the button's front are identical black silhouettes of a woman. Type on front of button reads, [BROTHERS/SUPPORTING/THE MILLION/WOMEN's MARCH/Philadelphia, Pa. OCT. 25, '97].

Negro Digest, Volume 18, Number 9

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Publication of "Negro Digest" with a cover featuring an image of a brass plaque created by the Edo peoples. The work has three (3) relief figures with ceremonial garb and accoutrements. Over top of the image is white text at the top, middle, and bottom, of the publication title, date, price and featured articles [Negro Digest/JULY 1969 A JOHNSON PUBLICATION 50ยข/SWAHILI/AND/BLACK/AMERICANS/TOWARD A BLACK AESTHETIC/ARTICLES BY: ADDISON GAYLE JR. - STANLEY/CROUCH - SARAH WEBSTER FABIO - AND OTHERS].
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