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The Gift of Adoption

Smithsonian Libraries

This entry was written by Linda Blancato, book lover and Adopt-a-Book supporter. I’ve always been a librarian at heart. My father was a master bookbinder who owned a bindery in Baltimore, Maryland. He instilled in his family a love and respect for all things related to books: the cover, the bindings, the pages, and of more »

The post The Gift of Adoption appeared first on Smithsonian Libraries Unbound.

The Law of Adoption 1929

National Anthropological Archives
Negative microfilm on file.

Text. Also two copies, typewritten, "The Laws of Adoption,-- of Persons, Families, Clans and Tribes." 7 pages. Translation of text.

Adoption Not Abortion

National Museum of American History

33c Adoption single

National Postal Museum
33-cent

Issued May 10, 2000

Multicolored

Self-adhesive

Holt Adoption Program Newsletter, 1962 New Years Greeting

National Museum of American History
Vertical, rectangular, bifold newsletter printed in dark green ink entitled "1962 New Years Greeting from the Harry Holt Family and the Holt Adoption Progam"; 8 pp. with photographs, folded at left. Letters from Bertha Holt and Harry Holt give updates about the orphanage in Korea and acquisition of a farm where a new complex is being built (accompanied by a scale drawing of the proposed plan); thanks are given for a "shipment of toys and teenage gifts" received for Christmas. A third letter from Susie Nelson concerns Congress' passage of a law banning proxy adoptions and stresses the importance of registering children so they can become naturalized citizens.

Holt Adoption Program Newsletter, 1967 New Years Greeting

National Museum of American History
Vertical, rectangular, bifold newsletter printed in black ink entitled "1967 New Years Greeting from Holt Adoption Progam and Harry Holt Family" with Santa Claus and children on the cover; 12 pp. with photographs, folded at left. Letter from Bertha Holt details "resolutions for 1967...[and] accomplishments of 1966" at the Creswell, Oregon, office, and at the orphanage in Korea; announces the Board's decision to open an "Adoption Program in Vietnam" and the resignation of The Rev. Louis O'Conner, Jr. as director; and gives thanks to the 57th Signal Corps for Christmas gifts and party. Other items include prayer requests, staff updates, items needed, correspondence from sponsors and donors, and a financial report for 1966.

Up for Adoption: Der Weltkrieg

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
This cigarette card collector’s book was produced and compiled in Germany in the late 1930′s as a commemoration of World War I, providing a visual record of scenes both on the front and at home. The war theme was popular in the 1930s and was later used for propaganda purposes during the growth of Nazism. more »

Holt Adoption Program Newsletter, September 1967

National Museum of American History
Unsent, vertical, rectangular, bifold newsletter printed in black ink with "A Child Needs A Home" inset on an image of two orphans on the cover; 12 pp. with photographs, folded at left. Letter from Bertha Holt gives updates about the orphanage in Korea (arrival of a piano, porches and play equipment, and baby chicks) along with a "Trip Through the Orphanage" in pictures. Other items include prayer requests, news about staff and adopted orphans, "Musings on 'Adoption'" by Executive Director, John E. Adams, and a profile of Shim Soon Kyoo as "Handicapped Child of the Month". Right side of back page with return address and postage paid; address area blank.

Certificate of Adoption for Nathaniel Holt

National Museum of American History
Vertical, rectangular carbon copy on ivory-colored paper of the "Certificate of Adoption" for Choi Bi Ho, by Harry Spencer Holt and Bertha Marion Holt of Creswell, Oregon. Bears original date of August 11, 1955 and signature of H. K. Lim, Judge, District Court of Seoul area, Republic of Korea. Personal information in English only; date and signature in English and Korean. Inscribed sideways along left edge "Nathaniel Chae Holt".

33c Adoption pane of twenty

National Postal Museum
33-cent

Pane of 20

Issued May 10, 2000

Multicolored

Self-adhesive

NASA Puts Earth Up for Adoption

Smithsonian Magazine

Adoption is a pretty tried and true conservation strategy. There’s adopt-a-highway to keep roadways clean, adopt-a-rainforest, adopt-a-puffin and dozens more. Now, NASA has taken things one step further, putting Earth up for adoption.

The project is called Adopt the Planet and it’s an effort to help raise awareness for Earth science and environmental problems in celebration of Earth Day. NASA has divided the entire surface of the planet into 64,000 hexagonal pieces, each about 55 miles wide. Anyone who signs up for an adoption gets a randomly selected tile somewhere on Earth along with an adoption certificate and Earth science data that NASA scientists and collaborators have spent decades collecting.

The goal is to have every block adopted by Earth Day on April 22. And if all 64,000 blocks are adopted, NASA will go through the entire list again. 

The project is not just a way to celebrate Earth Day, it’s also a chance for NASA to engage with the public about Earth science and get more people to take a close look at our home planet using their Worldview website. “NASA continually looks outward to find and learn about planets in our solar system and beyond, but no planet is better studied than the one we actually live on,” NASA says in the press release. “Our fleet of 18 Earth science missions in space, supported by aircraft, ships and ground observations, measure aspects of the environment that touch the lives of every person around the world.”

Worldview includes layers of data from each of those missions, including things like sea temperature, vegetation cover, cloud height, atmospheric dust, root zone soil moisture and dozens of other data sets.

In the last few years NASA has launched several Earth science missions, including the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, which maps carbon dioxide concentrations, as well as instruments to measure ocean winds, measure soil moisture and a satellite to measure clouds and dust particles in the atmosphere. The most recent mission is the GOES-16 weather satellite which includes a nifty lighting tracker.

But as Stephen Clark reports for Spaceflight Now, those missions might be it for a while. NASA is expecting cuts to its Earth science program, with four missions focused on climate science being targeted for elimination in the White House’s proposed budget. Still, NASA says it hopes to keep going with its Earth science program, even if there are cutbacks.

“We continue to be committed to studying our home planet,” Robert M. Lightfoot Jr., NASA’s acting administrator said in a recent address.“We’ll reshape our focus based on the resources available to us, and the budget, while it’s lower, is still in pretty good shape for us, for what we’re going to do in Earth science.”

3c Adoption of the Constitution plate proof

National Postal Museum
Certified plate proofs are the last printed proof of the plate before printing the stamps at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. These plate proofs are each unique, with the approval signatures and date. For postal scholars these plates provide important production information in the plate margin inscriptions, including guidelines, plate numbers, and initials of the siderographer, or person who created the plate from a transfer roll.

Plate No. 21706

Denomination: 3c

Subject: Adoption of the Constitution, Constitution Sesquicentennial Issue

Color: bright red violet

Tuscarora adoption historical tradition 1899-1882 (1921) 1927

National Anthropological Archives
From John A. Gibson, 1899- translated into Cayuga by Chief John Buck, Jr (1917); Legend of Ka-hwi'-ya (Phebe bird), Mr Buck; Creek Song, Bear, December 19, 1882, copied 1921.

The adoption of the Tutelo by the Cayuga 1917, 1923, 1929

National Anthropological Archives
autograph document

Also includes "Tutelo Custom." 1936. Autograph document. 7 pages. Onondaga texts with partial English interlinear translations. Informants: 1917, Abram Charles; 1936, S. Gibson.

Chernobyl Puppies Going Up for Adoption in the U.S.

Smithsonian Magazine

In 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant melted down, sending nearby residents fleeing the disaster zone. And sadly, most pets got left behind. Over the last 32 years, the surviving pups have multiplied, creating a community of hundreds that live in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and another 250 that live on the grounds of the former power plant itself.

Now, a dozen of those homeless puppies will head to the United States for adoption, reports Matt Novak at Gizmodo.

According to the Russian website Meduza, Ukrainian authorities have captured 200 of the stray Chernobyl puppies. They are currently keeping them in a 45-day quarantine in the city of Slavutych, and then a dozen will be shipped to the United States.

“We have rescued the first puppies, they are now in our adoption shelter going through the quarantine and decontamination process,” Lucas Hixson, co-founder of the U.S.-based Clean Futures Fund, a non-profit created to take care of Chernobyl clean-up workers, their families and the dogs tells Novak. “The goal is 200 dogs but will likely be more in the long run. My hope is to get 200 dogs rescued and adopted in the next 18 months and then go from there.”

The pups have a heartbreaking story, as The Guardian’s Julie McDowell detailed earlier this year. During the evacuation, more than 120,000 people were herded onto buses to escape the meltdown of the Unit 4 reactor, leaving most of their valuables and their pets behind. Many dogs tried to follow their owners onto the buses but were kicked off. People left notes on their doors asking authorities not to kill their animals, but Soviet Army squads were dispatched to put down as many contaminated animals as they could find.

Some of the dogs survived the army and the radiation, rebuilding their community as a pack. The Clean Futures Fund reports that the 250 dogs living on the grounds of the former power plant were likely driven out of the surrounding forests by wolves and a lack of food. Another 225 dogs roam Chernobyl City and hundreds of others live and scrounge at security checkpoints and throughout the woods and abandoned communities in the Exclusion Zone. Most of the dogs around the plant are under the age of 4 or 5, and clean-up workers at the site sometimes feed and tend to sick animals.

But last year, after becoming aware of the animals, The Clean Futures Fund decided the pups needed a more permanent solution. That’s why they’ve implemented a three-year program in the Exclusion Zone to spay and neuter 1,000 animals and vaccinate them against rabies. At their first clinic last August, the Fund spayed and neutered 350 dogs and cats in the area. Each animal was tested for radiation, given antibiotics, vaccinated for rabies and microchipped. Each dog's vital data was also recorded.

For the next clinic scheduled for June, the Fund has also partnered with researchers from the University of South Carolina. The team will study the dogs for signs of radiation poisoning as well as genetic damage and disruptions to the dogs’ microbiomes, reports Mary Katherine Wildeman at The Post and Courier. The team will sedate the dogs and look for tumors and cataracts, which can signal radiation poisoning.

Understanding the impacts of radiation exposure is becoming increasingly important, says Timothy Mousseau, a researcher who has studied radiation in the birds, insects and small animals of Chernobyl and will lead the project. Exposure rates in daily life from medical treatments and other sources are on the rise, with the average yearly dose Americans receive doubling in the last 20 years alone.

There is no word when or where the dozen Chernobyl pups will go up for adoption. But even if you're not lucky enough to have one of the reminders of Soviet-era nuclear power at the foot of your bed, it’s still possible to see the place for yourself and hand out treats to some of the remaining pups. There’s a booming tourism industry in the area to visit the eerie ghost towns and surprisingly quiet and beautiful green space that has overtaken the Zone.

Adopt Numbers!

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Here’s your chance to adopt Numbers (Stuttgart, 1968). The catalog is a collaboration between the poet Robert Creeley (1926-2005) and the influential American pop artist Robert Indiana (1928-), who is best known for his Love graphic and sculpture in Philadelphia. The book contains 10 screen-printed number designs by Indiana and 10 accompanying poems (one for each number) by Creeley, printed in both English more »

Adopt Ocean Gardens

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Here’s your chance to adopt Ocean Gardens: The History of the Marine Aquarium (London, 1857) by Henry Noel Humphreys! Humphreys, an illustrator, entomologist, and scholar of medieval manuscripts, wrote this little volume on the history of the marine aquarium, which includes advice on creating and maintaining one, and detailed information on which varieties of plants more »

Adopt-a-Book Event

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Thank you to those who attended our annual Adopt-a-Book event on January 9 in the Smithsonian Castle. Almost 120 books have been adopted since inception of our Adopt-a-Book program. Last year, 26 books were adopted at our Adopt-a-Book event (48 books were on display), 128 tickets were purchased and more than $10,000 was raised. This year, 45 books were adopted at the event (74 more »

Adopt Exploration scientifique de l‚ÄôAlgérie

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
This is your chance to adopt Exploration scientifique de l’Algérie (1846-49) by Hippolyte Lucas! Conceived and directed by the naturalist Bory de Saint Vincent, one of the first modern, systematic biological surveys of northern Africa was undertaken by the French government in the early 1840s and resulted in a multi-volume series of scientific publications under more »

Adopt Hand blocked wall papers!

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Zuber et Cie, founded in 1797 by Jean Zuber, is one of the most important manufacturers of hand blocked and scenic wallpapers. In 1804, Zuber produced one of the earliest scenics called “Vue de Suisses,” and they continue to be known for the quality of their wood block printing. This rare catalogue documents Zuber’s work more »

Secretary Skorton Adopts Books!

Smithsonian Libraries
Last February we welcomed Smithsonian Secretary David J. Skorton to the Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library in the National Museum of Natural History. On behalf of his wife Dr. Robin Davisson and himself, the Secretary was on a mission to select books for conservation as part of the Libraries’ Adopt-a-Book Program. Lilla Vekerdy, head of special more »
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