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Found 5,016 Collections

 

Aurora Borealis

The Northern Lights remind us how truly fabulous nature can be.
Debora Moore
10
 

Uniforms

Bethalto History
3
 

Everyday Use

Bethalto History
4
 

Klein's Drugstore

Bethalto History
4
 

School

Bethalto Museum
Bethalto History
5
 

Inca Technological Advances

This collection is meant to be used as preparation for a summative on the technological advances of the Inca Empire. Students should have a passing familiarity with some of the technological advances mentioned in this collection, as the objects and questions are meant to probe deeper and help students expand their knowledge on each item. Ultimately, the goal is for students to be able to utilize this collection in a debate or paper in which they articulate which technological advances of the Inca Empire had the most impact on its success. 

Melissa Galvin
16
 

The Bikini Atoll and Operation Crossroads: Unveiling Stories

In this activity, students will analyze photographs documenting the exodus of Bikini islanders from Bikini Atoll prior to Operation Crossroads, a pair of nuclear weapons tests and the first detonations of nuclear devices since the bombing of Nagasaki. These photographs were taken by Carl Mydans and were published in the LIFE Magazine article, "Atomic Bomb Island," on March 25, 1946.

Using two Project Zero Global Thinking Routines - "Unveiling Stories" and "The 3 Ys" - students will analyze the stories these photographs communicate about the experiences of the Bikini islanders and America's perspective on military advancement after WWII. They will also consider the perspectives presented by these photographs, in multiple contexts from the personal to the global. Additional resources (primary sources and the original article) and information on using this collection in the classroom can by found by clicking Read More ».

Keywords: atomic testing, atomic bomb, operation crossroads, bikini islands, bikini atoll, rongerik, able test, baker test, nuclear bomb, photojournalism, inquiry strategy, global competence, global competency, 1940s, 40s, 1950s, 50s, 1960s, 60s


Renea Reichenbach
15
 

Postwar Economic Boom in 1950s Advertising

This is a student activity about rhetorical strategies for persuasion using both text and images. The images in this collection are different advertisements published in the United States during the 1950s. As you look through them, think about these questions:

-What do the advertisements of the 1950s indicate about the postwar economic boom, as well as advances in science and technology?

-How did these things change American life?

-How do these images compare to American life in the 1930s (during the Great Depression and prior to World War II)?

Alexi Murray
5
 

Postwar Economic Boom in 1950s Advertising

This is a student activity about rhetorical strategies for persuasion using both text and images. The images in this collection are different advertisements published in the United States during the 1950s. As you look through them, think about these questions:

-What do the advertisements of the 1950s indicate about the postwar economic boom, as well as advances in science and technology?

-How did these things change American life?

-How do these images compare to American life in the 1930s (during the Great Depression and prior to World War II)?

Jason Berling
5
 

People, Place and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente by Adrián Román (

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente” by Adrian “Viajero” Román. In this three-dimensional multimedia installation, the artist portrays a black Puerto Rican woman who migrated to the United States in the 1940s. This portrait allows the artist (in his own words) “ to embark on a quest to visually represent how precious our memories are and capture the dignity in the people’s struggle and validate their existence.” The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines. 

 Students will observe and analyze this three dimensional work of art and they will describe both its exterior and interior. Students will create their own box to reflect their heritage and personal story or that of a Hispanic figure.

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool Funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art and culture,and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

# National Portrait Gallery  #The Outwin # Adrián “Viajero” Román # Caja de Memoria Viva II # Spanish # Puerto Rico # New York # Empathy # Inequality # Critical thinking # Curiosity # Heritage # Stories #LatinoHAC


Tracy Zarodnansky
45
 

Life on Oregon Trail

Cate Huang
7
 

Bison Bison

At their peak there may have been as many as 60 million Bison Bison roaming America. By the start of the 1800s, the impact of Euro-Americans on Bison herds was already evident. Throughout the 1800s, the bison population decreased from millions to less  than 400 wild bison left in the United States.

1.  Look through the provided artworks of bison provided.

2.  Select two artworks.

3.  For each artwork do See, Think, Wonder. 

See - write down exactly what you see.

Think - write a sentence about what you think about the artwork.

Wonder - write a sentence about something the artwork made you wonder about.

4. Write a short paragraph (3-5 sentences) comparing and contrasting the two different depictions of bison.


Madeleine Roberg
20
 

"The Raven," by Edgar Allan Poe

I use this specific "Raven" lesson with 10th grade American Lit students who have some prior knowledge of Poe. This particular class has already read "The Tell Tale Heart," additionally, they have a strong understanding of the qualities associated with Dark Romantic style - having read The Scarlet Letter and Young Goodman Brown, in addition to The Tell Tale Heart. This particular poem also comes on the heals of completing the Emily Dickinson unit, so therefore they have a good grasp of what is required when you're explicating a poem, what steps to follow, etc. This particular "Raven" lesson takes approximately two 45 minute class periods. Step by step for the lesson is featured below in the "notes" section.  #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
7
 

Artists and Feminism

Women in mid-twentieth century and after made an enormous impact not only in arts, but also in literary forms.  

Matisse's Tea, which starts this collection shows the contrasting use of color, pattern, and line on Marguerite and Henriette creating a feeling of imbalance in the piece. This piece confronts the viewer with the tension between restraint and nature.

This tension is taken to  a different form in the artists displayed here.

Simone de Beauvoir, uses in promoting feminism, according to Simone de Beauvoir, women do not choose to think about their bodies and bodily processes negatively; rather they are forced to do so as a result of being embedded in a hostile patriarchal society. Andy Warhol , creator of Pop Art, used multiple images of American icon, Marilyn Monroe to produce art. 

Another artist, Judy Chicago wanted to demonstrate women's achievements through history in the collaborated installation The Dinner Party. Her goal was to ensure that this tribute to women becomes a permanent part of our cultural heritage.


bbridgette
6
 

Dahlia's Collection

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
0
 

Nia M. Collection

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
4
 

test

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
0
 

Lara's collection

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
0
 

The Four Freedoms

The "Four Freedoms" speech, as the 1941 State of the Union address came to be known, were goals outlined by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on January 6, 1941 to Congress and the American people. He proposed four fundamental freedoms that people everywhere in the world should enjoy and described the "unprecedented" threat that Nazi domination of Europe presented to the security of the United States. This Learning Lab collection includes four Norman Rockwell paintings, alongside a portrait of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and a stamp with this iconic phrase. An audio excerpt of the speech is available via the National Archives and included here.
Glenn Wiebe
9
 

"The Things They Carried," by Tim O'Brien

This collection reflects the works of art included in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's exhibit: “Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975."    #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
24
 

Seeds and Seedlings

Intro to study of Plant Growth

John Fuller
12
 

Blacksmith Shop

Come along and explore the Blacksmith Shop at La Purisima Mission.  Are you ready?  Let's go! 

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
12
 

Existentialism and the Absurd in Art and Culture Across Time

In this collection I explore aesthetic elements of Existentialism and the Absurd in Art and Culture across time. The central preoccupations of Existential Philosophy: the quest for authenticity, the meaning of life, the absurdity of human existence, etc. are central to many dilemmas and fundamental questions in Literature, Philosophy and Art in general. The main motivation for choosing this theme comes from this assay:

Sadigh, Michah. “The Foundation of Existentialism in the Oldest Story Ever Told: The Epic of Gilgamesh.” Existential Analysis 21.1 (2010).

And readings of Albert Camus' books such as The Myth of Sisyphus:

"All Sisyphus' silent joy is contained therein. His fate belongs to him. His rock is a thing. Likewise, the absurd man, when he contemplates his torment, silences all the idols. In the universe suddenly restored to its silence, the myriad wondering little voices of the earth rise up. Unconscious, secret calls, invitations from all the faces, they are the necessary reverse and price of victory... The rock is still rolling. I leave Sisyphus at the foot of the mountain! One always finds one's burden again. But Sisyphus teaches the higher fidelity that negates the gods and raises rocks. He too concludes that all is well. This universe henceforth without a master seems to him neither sterile nor futile. Each atom of that stone, each mineral flake of that night filled mountain, in itself forms a world. The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy."

The Myth of Sisyphus, by Albert Camus (1942)


Elizabeth Burzinski
30
 

The Women Who Made a Difference

This collection represents the women of the Ancient Times who made a difference in their respective civilizations.

Those female figures held powerful roles, and played significantly influential parts in the domains traditionally held by men. Their names are still known today.

Enheduanna, the earliest known poet, helped her father to unite the Akkadians and the Sumerians through poetry, while Sappho, brought us a lyrical poetry, she would talk about love, feelings, and woman (from a woman’s point of view). Her poetry was unlike others; previous and current poets at the time were male and wrote about events that focused on the Gods and men in general.

Queen Nefertiti together with her husband united Egyptian people under one god, the Sun God.

Cleopatra, the last Pharaoh of Egypt, secured her position—and her Egypt’s independence—through her influence over Roman leaders Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, some of the most powerful Western men of the time

Artemisia of Halicarnassus, also known as Artemisia I of Caria, is credited with persuading Persian King Xerxes to abandon his invasion of Greece.

As we can see, ancient history has many strong female figures, and their names echo down history to the present day.

bbridgette
7
1-24 of 5,016 Collections