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Found 5,333 Collections

 

Columbian History

This is a variety of pieces in the Columbian era of America.
Daniel Mian
5
 

Civilization

Kirra Lent
5
 

Station 2: Paleolithic

Kirra Lent
3
 

East Asian Numismatics in 3D!

The Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection (NNC) is America's collection of monetary and transactional objects. This diverse and expansive global collection contains objects that represent every inhabited continent and span more than 3,000 years of human history. The NNC holds an expansive collection of East Asian coins with notable objects from China, Korea, and Japan. Indeed, many of the earliest donations to the Smithsonian in the 19th century were East Asian coins and paper currencies. They include a set of coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant by the Japanese Meiji Emperor during Grant’s world tour. Grant’s widow, Julia Dent Grant, donated the unique gift to the museum in 1886. Shortly after, the estate of collector George Bunker Glover bequeathed more than 2,025 pieces of East Asian currency to the Smithsonian. Growth of the NNC’s East Asian collection continued in the 20th century with significant donations from The Chase Manhattan Money Museum,  the descendants of collector Alexander I. Pogrebetsky, and the estate of collector Josiah K. Lilly Jr. Today the NNC continues to grow its East Asian holdings. In 2017 the NNC received 473 objects from the Howard F. Bowker Collection. Thanks to the generous support of the Howard F. Bowker Family, Michael Chou, and the Smithsonian’s 3D Program, the NNC’s East Asian holdings are accessible online, with a selection available in 3D!


Emily Pearce Seigerman
20
 

Alexander the Great

The question “Was Alexander Great?”

#TeachingInquir

Dave Montgomery
8
 

Reading American Art as a Historical Source

How can American art be read as a historical text? How can it be used to explore the 2018 National History Day theme of "Conflict and Compromise in History"? This collection examines two works of American art closely, modeling the process of historical inquiry and analysis. It also shares several online resources on reading artwork in a historical context, and suggests additional artworks from SAAM's collection that might support the theme of Conflict and Compromise.

#NHD2018 #NHD

Keywords: Reconstruction, Civil War, John Rogers, Winslow Homer

#historicalthinking


Phoebe Hillemann
29
 

Pictographs

Native American Pictographs
Connie Grimes
3
 

Gere Kavanaugh

Mandy Horton
5
 

Dorothy Wright Liebes

Dorothy Wright Liebes was a textile designer who is known for having developed a distinctive look, including vibrant colors and patterns that became synonymous with the Modernist movement in California in the 1940s and 1950s. Widely traveled, Liebes often drew inspiration from the places she visited around the world for her unique textile designs. Her designs often include bold colors associated with California Modernism.

Contributions of Liebes can be found in the American Art Archives, the National Portrait Gallery as well as the Copper Hewitt Design museum, this collection included examples across the Smithsonian but primarily focuses on content from the Cooper Hewitt.

Mandy Horton
65
 

Trude Guermonprez

Trude Guermonprez (1910-1979) was a highly regarded textile designer born in Germany. Guermonperz immigrated to America and began teaching weaving at the Black Mountain College in North Carolina until the weaving program there ended. Trude Guermonperz then went on to teach at

California School of Fine Arts (now the San Francisco Art Institute), and finally at California College of Arts and Crafts (now known as the California College of Art & Design) where she became chair of the department. Through her teaching Guermonperz had an enormous impact on American weavers, many cite her as an influence and inspiration. Trude Guermonprez's work includes designs that were completed for clients and industry as well as broad collection of highly experimental pieces.

This collection focuses on the objects within the Cooper Hewitt Design Museums collection from Trude Guermonprez, yet also includes photographs of the designer from the Archives of American Art.

Mandy Horton
43
 

Edward O. Wilson: Ant Biologist

What is an entomologist? Through the study of the Edward O. Wilson portrait, our students will explore the career of an ant biologist, study the plants and insects in our community, and create a self-portrait demonstrating their understanding.

Objectives: 

  • Students will be able to define the role of an entomologist.
  • Students will understand the concept of biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to classify a living creature as "insect" or "not an insect."
  • Students will observe and be able to describe local insects.
  • Students will understand the concept of habitat.
  • Students will observe and be able to describe  native plants.

Assessment: Students will create a self-portrait with a variety of native insects and plants similar to the E. O. Wilson portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019

#NPGteach

Jill Johnson
8
 

Contemporary Muslim Fashion

This collection explores the significance of the Contemporary Muslim Fashion exhibition to be held at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum. The collection explores traditional examples of Muslim dress from with the Cooper Hewitt's collection, and includes news articles that discuss the exhibition as well as the impact of comtemporary Muslim Fashion.

Mandy Horton
8
 

Statue of Liberty and Symbolism

This collection includes a variety of representations of the Statue of Liberty--as a protest object, on an environmental campaign poster, on a postage stamp, and as a symbol used on patterned clothing. In small groups, learners will apply three scaffolded Visible Thinking Routines to a resource of their choice. First, they will use a "See, Think, Wonder" thinking routine to note their observations and interpretations as well as anything about which they are curious. Next, they will analyze the resource using the "Layers" thinking routine. As an optional step, they could also consider the artist or creator of the object's point of view/perspective in creating the resource, with the "Step Inside" thinking routine. Finally, they will create an artwork or representation that depicts a cause that is important to a community of which they are a member.

A final item from the American Jewish Historical Society includes information on a student contest running from September 2019 until May 2020, where students create a new poem based on Emma Lazarus' s"New Colossus" on the Statue of Liberty.

#visiblethinking

Ashley Naranjo
26
 

The Pullman Porters and the Railcar: Nexuses of the Great Migration

The Pullman Porters and the railcar were carriers of hope during the era known as the Great Migration. Pullman Porters were employed by George Pullman who created the nation’s first luxury railcar and made his home in Chicago, Illinois. During the Great Migration, hundreds of thousands of African Americans sought greater employment and housing opportunities in northern cities like Chicago, Pittsburgh, and New York. They traveled to the North primarily on railcars though segregated from white passengers and in less comfortable conditions. The Pullman Porters were pillars in the Black community and made positive impacts on African American migrants, entrepreneurs, and social causes effecting the Black community.  

This collection displays the story of the Pullman Porters and demonstrates the railcar as a nexus of the Great Migration. A restored Pullman Palace railcar, Southern Railway No. 1200, is now housed at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. 

Keywords: Pullman Porters, George Pullman, Railcars, The Great Migration, NMAAHC, African American History, American History

Le'Passion Darby
13
 

Ruth Law: Breaking Barriers in Aviation and the War Effort

This topical collection of resources and analysis strategies can be used as a brainstorming tool to support student research on the National History Day (#NHD) 2020 theme of "Breaking Barriers in History". This collection focuses on primary and secondary sources around the accomplishments and contributions of aviator, Ruth Law. 

#BecauseOfHerStory #NHD #NHD2020

Tags: Ruth Bancroft Law Oliver, aviator, aviation, world records, flight, military, World War I, women's history

Ashley Naranjo
36
 

La Purisima Mission Tour

Discover the history behind La Purisima Mission State Historic Park!  Explore the vast history by examining the signage and displays of the Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
81
 

Military History at La Purisima Misison

Come along and explore the military history behind La Purisima Mission!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind the soldiers at La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
11
 

La Purisima Mission Visitor Center

Explore the wonders behind the La Purisima Mission Visitor Center!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
39
 

La Purisima Mission Church

Come along and explore the Church History behind La Purisima Mission!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind the Church at La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
16
 

Blacksmith Shop

Come along and explore the Blacksmith Shop at La Purisima Mission.  Are you ready?  Let's go! 

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
12
 

Behind Design: Exploring Culture Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors and/or restrictions influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, traditions, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation?  *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
30
 

Just Cool

#MCteach

Sara Ducey
9
 

Resistance

"[Resistance is the power and capacity to exert force in opposition;  iis the refusal to accept or comply with something; it is the attempt to prevent something by action or argument.]  When we talk about resistance to slavery, at first glance one might think this is a narrow topic, since slavery itself is such a broad subject. It turns out, however, that resistance actually impacted (and continues to impact) every aspect of slavery and its legacy. There is resistance during the entire time, from 1619 or so, when the first African-Americans are brought into Virginia, until slavery is officially legally ended in 1865 (with continued resistance with regard to slavery’s unfortunate legacy of Jim Crow laws, Black Codes and other forms of institutionalized racism, intrinsic bias, as well as micro and macro aggressions).  Though we must learn about the horrors and oppression of slavery, we must also learn about the resilience of enslaved and formerly enslaved people. Any study of slavery that does not include the consistent and concentrated efforts of the enslaved to resist is woefully inaccurate. The enslaved resisted. The formerly enslaved resisted. Today, the descendants of the enslaved involuntary immigrants continue to resist the oppression that is the legacy of slavery." 

Greenberg, Kenneth, Distinguished Professor of History/ narrator. "Resistance Means more Than Rebellion." iTunes app, 1, March 2018.

Sher Anderson Petty
11
1-24 of 5,333 Collections