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Found 5,751 Collections

 

Teaching Critical Thinking through Art with the National Gallery of Art

The resources in this collection are pulled directly from the National Gallery of Art’s online course Teaching Critical Thinking through Art. Based on the popular Art Around the Corner professional development program for teachers in Washington, D.C., this five-unit online course provides everything you need to begin creating a culture of critical thinking and collaboration for any classroom, subject, or level. You do not need an art background or museum access to successfully integrate the course materials into your teaching. Your willingness to experiment with new teaching practices is all that is required.

Find demonstrations, lesson plans, and videos here on the edX platform! Now in English, Español, Français, and 简体中文

nga_mooc
11
 

Threatened Clarity of Lake Tahoe

Tahoe has become something of a symbol of the controversial balance between preserving and expanding into natural systems. Tahoe’s clarity has also been decreasing since at least 1968 from 100 foot visibility to about 70, with fine particles largely from urban expansion as one of the main causes, as well as introduction of invasive species. These photos and questions will help students to understand some of the reasons why Tahoe is becoming murkier, and can provoke relevant ideas about how to slow that loss of clarity down or even reverse it, so that future generations of people and native species can enjoy and rely on this magnificent lake for the foreseeable future, as they have in the past. Simply click the paperclip in each image to see the questions or prompts pertaining to that photo. This collection is ideal for a discussion based lesson among classmates or friends.

Lake Tahoe Interpretation
19
 

Sparkle Sort

Nicki May
10
 

Baking in an American Kitchen, Circa 1975

Utensils, appliances and recipes help portray how baking was a connective fiber in suburban families of America in the 1970's.

Pamela Schembri
22
 

The Intersection of Race and Disability

#ethnicstudies

Amy Prescott
32
 

Transcribe: Chinese Banknotes from the Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection

In this collection, the Smithsonian Transcription Center and the National Museum of American History's National Numismatic Collection invite you to help transcribe the languages recorded on historic Chinese Banknotes. This work will help ensure that researchers around the world can more easily find and use these collections. 

Collection includes: instructions on required and optional steps for transcription, translation, and transliteration; links to the Chinese Banknote transcription projects on the Smithsonian Transcription Center website; and more.

Keywords: currency, money, Chinese language, NNC, NMAH, American history, East Asian history, foreign language

Background

The Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection (NNC) is America's collection of monetary and transactional objects. This diverse and expansive global collection contains objects that represent every inhabited continent and span more than three thousand years of human history.

Established in the mid-19th century, several of the earliest additions to the NNC were artifacts from Japan, Korea, and China, including coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant from Japanese Emperor Meiji (received in 1881) and the 2,025 East Asian coins, amulets, and notes from George Bunker Glover’s private collection (received in 1897). These donations were the foundation of the NNC’s East Asian holdings, which continues to grow with new acquisitions, such as the Howard F. Bowker collection in 2017.

During 2017-2018, the NNC digitized more than 8,000 of its East Asian Coins, making them publicly accessible and available for research worldwide. The NNC is now working to digitize 6,000 Chinese notes and paper transactional objects that range from the Ming Dynasty to the present day.

One of the main challenges to the digitization process is the transcription of several Asian alphabets, which would increase accessibility and searchability for the many items in this collection. Sometimes this can be done quickly, but often the process is too lengthy for NNC team members to complete while moving the project forward efficiently. In order to continue to share these objects rapidly, we need your help! 

The digitization of the East Asian coins and Chinese banknotes would not have been possible without the generous support of the the Howard F. Bowker family and Michael Chou. 

For full instructions, please see this page on the Smithsonian Transcription Center website.

Smithsonian Transcription Center
12
 

Chicano Movement

Who has access to the American Dream? How do groups fight for access?  How is the fight for access reflected in art and culture?

 TEKS US.24B describe  the impacts of cultural movements in art, music, and literature such as Tin Pan Alley, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Generation, rock and roll, the Chicano Mural Movement, and country and western music on American society #ethnicstudies

Beth Childs
8
 

Inter/sected - LGBTQ + Asian Pacific Americans

Inter/sected, was a photo exhibit on display at the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center July 5 to September 22, 2019, that celebrated the intersected identities of Queer Asian Pacific Americans. The AARC worked with local Austin photographer Ben Aqua. Ben has titled their photo series “Slaysians,” portraits of LGBTQ+ Asians/Pacific Islanders on their Instagram account at @b3naqua. Ben's pronouns are they/them/theirs.

Teachers and students may use this collection to discuss intersectionality, Asian American identities, gender spectrum/non binary, culture and resistance to assimilation, and expressions through art.  Articles, photographs, and supplemental film, podcast and archive resources are included for further analysis on queer Asian American experiences in the US.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: asian americans, queer, LGBTQ, intersectionality, gender, queer

 #EthnicStudies

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
16
 

Antique and Vintage Hole Punches

The Scaglione Antique and Vintage Office Museum

This collection features American made hole punches manufactured between the years 1874 and 1932. It is one of the the most complete collections of antique and vintage paper perforators in the world. It is interesting to note that some of the machines in this collection have not been seen in over 100 years. With the exception of wood block cuttings use in the advertisement process, these machines may be the last of their kind.

Hole punches have been around since the early 1870’s therefore, we have a great selection of antique and vintage machines for review and examination. The development of punches really took off in the early 1900’s and improvements followed. Many machines produced today are based on designs dating  to 1912.

Today, we refer to this office machine as a hole punch. During the period dating from 1874 to the 1930's these machines were known as paper punch,  hole punchers, perforators, or paper perforators. There was no real standard for a machine that punched hole.

In 1882 James Shannon filed for a patent for his paper file. While the patent is for a complete paper file, his patent described the paper punch that was part of his invention. After reviewing the patent one is left wondering if he was at a loss as to what to call his hole punch. As a result his invention is overlooked by many and the credit for the invention of the hole punch has been credited to someone else. (enclosed as a pdf at the bottom of this page - The first paper hole punch)

Even now, some examples are proving to be more desirable to collectors and are harder to find. The Globe No. 4 produced by Globe-Wernicke is one such machine that has a following of not only the punch collector, but by collectors of the machine age. This machine appears to draw the most interest from individuals wanting an old paper hole punch for the desk or collection. Another example is the early examples of the Tengwell which had a nicely scrolled plate and was mounted on a beautiful oak base.

Variants hold their own interest to many collectors. You will find the same machine, such as the Improved Hummer,  was produced by different companies. Research has shown that many companies or their assets changed hands more than once during the century and that the machines were never improved upon or only minor changes were introduced, usually just parts on the machine or the manufacturers name.

When examining the early machines, it is easy to see these machines are historic. They were developed and manufactured during the mechanical revolution, Simple in design yet dependable.  These  19th century designs are what you would expect of the era and this is where the concept of paper punches began. 

Many paper hole punches have been lost to time, because of modernization, workmanship or better material. Examples such as the Sam’l Tatum’s Samson, Eclipse, and the No. 27 are just a few of those machines that were lost or discontinued. These machines were the work  of Walter Mendenhall, long time employee of the Tatum Company. Compared to the punches today, these machines are complex and curious. Their mechanisms were unique in design and never copied by any other manufacturer. 

Curtis Scaglione
81
 

To Do in Egypt

It is one of the ancient countries in the world which covers a wide range of attractions that attract several tourists. It is an ideal destination for those who want to discover archaeological sites and other things in detail. Traveling to Egypt for the first time and wondering what to know before your trip?

is an extremely enjoyable experience when you engage in the history and culture of the Pharaohs’ land.

A Trip to Egypt is a fantastic tourist destination that attracts people from all age group. Tourists have the chance of wandering Egypt’s architectural wealth, which is one of a kind. The well known pyramids of Giza, ancient temples, royal tombs, the Sphinx, and mosques are only a few of the most stunning attractions that this wonderful country has to offer. With so many places to visit and things to do, the moments spent there will ever worth remembering.

Unlike other countries, Egypt weather remains sunny and clear the year round. It is a bit rainy at winter but in places like Luxor and Aswan in upper Egypt it remains dry and clear. Egypt has a temperate weather during the whole year so there is no particular season to visit it.

Nile Cruise is a very enjoyable experience that any visitor must do when he visit Egypt. The Nile Cruise Trip combines the History with the pleasant atmosphere which makes it an unforgettable Trip. As soon as you board one of our special boats, something inside you will stir as it transports you, in majestic splendor, through a magical mystical land.It will steal your heart away.

There is long list of Nile River cruises from budget to 5 star luxury Nile River cruises, range of private and group luxury Nile River Cruise holidays starting from Cairo, Aswan, Luxor and Abu Simbel and varies between large cruise ships, small boats, steam ships and Dahabiyas.

Itineraries start from short 3 nights cruise to super long two weeks along the river from Cairo to Aswan. Cruise ships sailing on the Nile offer the guests with the best perfectly organized itineraries to visit the highlights and the most important monuments in and around the cities of Luxor and Aswan.

The visits included almost in all programs would be the Temple of Karnak, the Temple of Luxor, the Valley of the Kings, the Colossi of Memnon, and the Temple of Queen Hatshepsut in Luxor. In Aswan, the guests will have a marvelous chance to explore the High Dam, the Temple of Philae, and the Unfinished Obelisk.

You may add more attractions to visit to your cruise vacations spending 2 to 3 days in any f the Red Sea resorts like  Marsa Alam, it is also possible to fly to Sharm El Sheikh another lovely tourist spot in Sinai Peninsula wandering Bedouins and enjoying the underwater world of the Red Sea in addition to Sinai desert adventures.

Do not miss this wonderful opportunity to uncover the attractions of ancient Egypt while sailing down the majestic Nile River.

Pvt2019
0
 

Heat Shields - Keeping It Cool

This collection explores the function and chemistry of heat shields on spacecraft and their evolution over the years.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
17
 

Cultural Communications/Making the Melting Pot a Reality

DRAFT Global competence is essential to the approach because we will study the various ways worldwide cultures use to communicate with one another. Language is the very first tool that we use to understand the ideas that we are trying to share. But what about the monuments, art, and songs that we have created to share our ideas with one another? This exploration will focus on how American culture founded on the mixing of ethnicities and experiences used the skills and talents of its members to reveal its faults and celebrate its wonder and imagination. This collection will explore the sights and sounds of those who were here before all others, the 1st Nation Peoples, and travel from that past to the lives of their descendants and the all who followed by coming to the shores of this country. This exploration will give students a way to examine the history of those around them, but also their place within this most extravagant quilt of this country. #goglobal

Sean Felix
43
 

Making the Old New: Rethinking Monuments and Memorials

In this collection, students will work with images, videos, and texts related to Marta Minujín's "Parthenon of Books" to create a series of questions that a creator must ask and answer before designing a memorial or monument. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
8
 

Inspiration: Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome in Our Nation's Capital

In this collection, students will work with images of buildings from ancient Greece and ancient Rome along with images of iconic buildings in Washington, D.C. to identify ways that early Americans were inspired by ancient Greeks and Romans. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
7
 

Symbols: Using Images to Invoke Feelings

In this collection, students will work with Americana images to do a "close view" that will allow them to make inferences about which feelings did the artists intend to invoke by using symbols. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
9
 

Making Cultural Connections in Pre-AP World Geography

This adapted collection includes resources for ninth-grade Pre-AP World Geography students. After studying the aspects of culture in the Human Geography unit, students will focus on the culture of the United States and Canada in Unit 4. 

Using the collection, students will explain the impact of immigration on American culture. Students will also develop questions and research how their ethnic groups and culture are reflected in the art and history of North America and connected to regions of the world.

 #EthnicStudies

Melissa Blohm
35
 

Dar al Islam Introduction, Global Tapestry 1.2

This collection serves as a warm-up and introduction for an AP World History lesson. Students work in pairs to make observations; after analysis and exploration of sources, students will review their notes and add specific historical evidence to explain each piece of the collection. 

#EthnicStudies

Melissa Blohm
8
 

People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Collection 1 - Night of the Dead by Alan Crane

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Night of the Dead” by Alan Crane. The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines. 

Students will investigate how the Day of the Dead is celebrated by Latin Americans and compare it to their own celebrations. Next, students  will create an interactive presentation using Flipgrid and write a monologue to reflect their learning from the point of view of one of the persons in the artwork. 

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art, and culture, and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

#National Portrait Gallery #Spanish #Global awareness #Empathy #Global connections #Global-mindedness #Curiosity #Cross-cultural skills #Day of the Dead #Worldview #LatinoHAC


Marcela Velikovsky
48
 

People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Night of the Dead by Alan Crane

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Night of the Dead” by Alan Crane. The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines. 

Students will investigate how the Day of the Dead is celebrated by Latin Americans and compare it to their own celebrations. Next, students  will create an interactive presentation using Flipgrid and write a monologue to reflect their learning from the point of view of one of the persons in the artwork. 

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art, and culture, and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

#National Portrait Gallery #Spanish #Global awareness #Empathy #Global connections #Global-mindedness #Curiosity #Cross-cultural skills #Day of the Dead #Worldview #LatinoHAC


Vicky Masson
47
 

Ethnic Studies

Primary source set asks students to examine whose voice is valued in U.S.A. 

#ethnicstudies

Jennifer Smith
5
 

Los Angeles Latino Families Photo Project

The Los Angeles Latino Families Photo Project was launched at the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center (CSRC) spring 2012. It is an extension of an earlier initiative launched in 2007 to combat the invisibility of the Mexican American contribution to Los Angeles and California history predating the social movements of the 1960s and 1970s within textbooks, trade, and academic books and articles. With the generous support of the John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes Foundation, the CSRC was able to digitize close to 3,000 images from the Edward R. Roybal Papers and the Yolanda Retter Vargas Collection of Orphan Photographs. The first collection documents Edward Roybal’s public service career from the 1940s to the 1990s as a Los Angeles city councilman and a U.S. congressman. The second was collected by the previous librarian, Yolanda Retter-Vargas, who found the photographs at various flea markets. This collection consists of “orphan” photographs—images with no provenance information. They appear to belong to six families. Both collections have been completed and are available on the UCLA Digital Library. 

After completing this project we quickly realized that Los Angeles Latino history is incomplete without the stories of its citizens. The Los Angeles Latino Families Photo Project was developed as a way to fully capture the complexity of this city’s history as well as address the issue of preservation through the digitization of vulnerable image-based collections. The photographs found in this particular collection were digitized and preserved during a Friends of the Library workshop held at the Chicano Studies Research Center spring 2012. They highlight the day-to-day lives of Latinos and Latinas living in Los Angeles over time. They document their families' histories and cultures capturing their movements between the United States and Latin America. One of the project’s goals is to provide the opportunity for community members to contribute additional photographs and information for the archival record.

#LatinoHAC #ethnicstudies

Rubina Pantoja
39
 

The Chicano Movement

#ethnicstudies

Rubina Pantoja
8
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