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Found 5,316 Collections

 

Edward O. Wilson: Ant Biologist

What is an entomologist? Through the study of the Edward O. Wilson portrait, our students will explore the career of an ant biologist, study the plants and insects in our community, and create a self-portrait demonstrating their understanding.

Objectives: 

  • Students will be able to define the role of an entomologist.
  • Students will understand the concept of biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to classify a living creature as "insect" or "not an insect."
  • Students will observe and be able to describe local insects.
  • Students will understand the concept of habitat.
  • Students will observe and be able to describe  native plants.

Assessment: Students will create a self-portrait with a variety of native insects and plants similar to the E. O. Wilson portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019

#NPGteach

Jill Johnson
8
 

Ruth Law: Breaking Barriers in Aviation and the War Effort

This topical collection of resources and analysis strategies can be used as a brainstorming tool to support student research on the National History Day (#NHD) 2020 theme of "Breaking Barriers in History". This collection focuses on primary and secondary sources around the accomplishments and contributions of aviator, Ruth Law. 

#BecauseOfHerStory #NHD2020

Tags: Ruth Bancroft Law Oliver, aviator, aviation, world records, flight, military, World War I, women's history

Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Statue of Liberty and Symbolism

This collection includes a variety of representations of the Statue of Liberty--as a protest object, on an environmental campaign poster, on a postage stamp, and as a symbol used on patterned clothing. In small groups, learners will apply three scaffolded Visible Thinking Routines to a resource of their choice. First, they will use a "See, Think, Wonder" thinking routine to note their observations and interpretations as well as anything about which they are curious. Next, they will analyze the resource using the "Layers" thinking routine. As an optional step, they could also consider the artist or creator of the object's point of view/perspective in creating the resource, with the "Step Inside" thinking routine. Finally, they will create an artwork or representation that depicts a cause that is important to a community of which they are a member.

A final item from the American Jewish Historical Society includes information on a student contest running from September 2019 until May 2020, where students create a new poem based on Emma Lazarus' s"New Colossus" on the Statue of Liberty.

#visiblethinking

Ashley Naranjo
26
 

Student Led Visual Thinking - Workshop #1

#SAAMTeach - directions are provided in the resources.

Leslie Schaffer
13
 

The Pullman Porters and the Railcar: Nexuses of the Great Migration

The Pullman Porters and the railcar were carriers of hope during the era known as the Great Migration. Pullman Porters were employed by George Pullman who created the nation’s first luxury railcar and made his home in Chicago, Illinois. During the Great Migration, hundreds of thousands of African Americans sought greater employment and housing opportunities in northern cities like Chicago, Pittsburgh, and New York. They traveled to the North primarily on railcars though segregated from white passengers and in less comfortable conditions. The Pullman Porters were pillars in the Black community and made positive impacts on African American migrants, entrepreneurs, and social causes effecting the Black community.  

This collection displays the story of the Pullman Porters and demonstrates the railcar as a nexus of the Great Migration. A restored Pullman Palace railcar, Southern Railway No. 1200, is now housed at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. 

Keywords: Pullman Porters, George Pullman, Railcars, The Great Migration, NMAAHC, African American History, American History

Le'Passion Darby
14
 

Declaration of Independence

Artifacts to assist students in learning about the Declaration of Independence. #SAAMTeach

Leslie Schaffer
5
 

Just Cool

#MCteach

Sara Ducey
7
 

Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth.

In an upcoming exhibition, titled Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth., African American changemakers will be highlighted to illustrate their outstanding legacy and contributions. These individuals are icons often rendered invisible by a country, yet uplifted by a major culture. The following images showcase the legacy of men and women featured in the exhibition, illuminating their greatest works, interactions with the community, and so forth. Ever individual, whether featured in the exhibit or Learning Lab, affirm the power of the African American journey and, ultimately, the American experience. 

As you navigate throughout this Learning Lab, take notice of the various sections the Men of Change are divided into; such as Storytellers, Myth-breakers, Fathering, Community, Imagining, Catalysts and Loving.

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
69
 

Breaking Barriers at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to support the 2020 National History Day theme, Breaking Barriers in History. Utilizing portraits and other resources from the National Portrait Gallery, this collection demonstrates the groundbreaking impact individuals had on American history.  The collection is organized according to spheres of influence, including: science; arts; labor; women's rights; media; athletics; civil rights; politics; and education. 

Be sure to check out the following at the end of the collection: 

-Reading Portraiture Guide for Educators highlights close looking strategies that can be used with the portraits listed

-Breaking Barriers In History Theme Book from National History Day 2020

#NHD2020 #NHD

#NPGteach

Briana White
154
 

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos shares the compelling story of legendary activist and leader Dolores Huerta (b. 1930) and the farm workers movement of the 1960s and 70s. It is a quintessentially American tale of struggle and sacrifice, of courage and victory.

As a complement to the exhibition, these educational resources explore Huerta's public life as an activist and co-founder of the United Farm Workers  (UFW) and what led her to become a Latina civil rights icon. In her life as a communicator, organizer, lobbyist, contract negotiator, teacher and mother,  Huerta's unparalleled leadership skills helped dramatically improve the lives of farm workers.

Users will broaden their understanding of the farm workers movement through a careful look at Dolores Huerta's significant - but often under-acknowledged - contributions. The exhibition and educational resources also explore how workers of different ethnic and racial backgrounds came together to empower the movement and how the arts played an essential role. In addition, users will come to understand Huerta's far-reaching impact and important legacy.


Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
39
 

Shimomura's

Analyzing Roger Shimomura's painting "Diary 12, 1941" and understanding Japanese American internment

#SAAMteach 

Karen McClinchey
23
 

Carnival Arts

Traditional carnival sounds, video, and objects as well as other items to inspire new carnivals.
Celeste Landeros
15
 

Design with Empathy: Michael Graves Case Study

This collection is designed to explore the essential question: How do designers understand and experience the needs and wants of stakeholders? 

It looks into the design with empathy approach used by Michael Graves to design and test the Prime TC wheelchair for use in a hospital environment.  

Objectives:

  • Examine methods for developing empathy for your stakeholders  
  • Gain familiarity with the design process 
  • Understand what the steps of the design process might look like in application 

Unpacking Questions: 

  • What kind of things did the designers research?
  • What methods did they use to research and document primary data? 
  • Who worked with the designers on this project? What value did this add to the project perspective?
  • Which stakeholders did the design specifically accommodate? 
  • How were stakeholder needs prioritised?
  • What were the main issues the designer was trying to combat? 
  • List the steps of the design process evident in the case study.


Jasmine Kassulke
22
 

Technological Evolution

Our rapidly developing world has lead to unprecedented evolutions in technology. Technology tells a continuous narrative of innovation, disruption, collaboration, risk and resilience. Through this collection students explore the essential questions: What makes something innovative? How do you define innovation?

To help unpack these questions have students explore each object by answering:

  • Who is this object made for?
  • How is it used?
  • What did this object allow people to do?
  • What connections do you notice between the objects?
  • Was this technology innovative for its time? Why/Why not?  

This collection was inspired by the Bob Greenberg Selects exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum: https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/1108968917/page1

Jasmine Kassulke
35
 

North Carolina

Betsy Roman
8
 

Formosa

Emily Pearce Seigerman
42
 

Coral Reefs and Climate Change

Explore coral reefs and climate change through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
42
 

Volcanoes

Explore volcanic eruptions and their effect on rock formations through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: plate tectonics, seismic activity, geologist


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Lives of Stars

Explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: supernova, electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear fusion, space, planetary science


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Forensic Anthropology: What Bones Reveal

Explore what human bones reveal about the past through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.


Keywords: anthropology, archeology, archaeology, carbon dating, chemistry, data, heredity, evolution, carbon 14

Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
46
 

Bees

Explore bees' behavior and their role in pollination through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: animal, insect, plant adaptation, animal communication, flowers, pollen, honey, hive, engineering, entomologist, pollinator, colony, system


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
61
 

Spark!Lab Invention Steps with Shopping Carts

Explore Spark!Lab's invention steps through the process of a real inventor, Orla Watson, who changed grocery shopping for millions of people with his telescoping shopping cart. Then make your own cart with our final invention challenge! Click through each of the items below and be sure to read the information (i) sections

Objectives:

  • Understand the invention process by examining one specific invention 
  • Discover and critically analyze objects and primary sources from the National Museum of American History's archives and collection

The Draper Spark!Lab is a hands-on invention activity center housed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. 

Marie-Louise Orsini
22
 

Climate Change and Alexis Rockman's Manifest Destiny

In preparing to paint his large-scale mural, Manifest Destiny, a commission for the Brooklyn Museum's re-opening in 2004, Alexis Rockman consulted with climate change experts to imagine what Brooklyn might look like several centuries in the future when the glaciers have melted and sea levels have risen.

Teachers can use this painting as a starting point to discussing the issue of climate change, understanding what's at risk, and exploring mitigation strategies coastal cities might take to prevent an outcome like the one Rockman predicts.

Phoebe Hillemann
5
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