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Found 22 Collections

 

Parks and Playgrounds: Preschool

Use these pictures to help your child make careful observations of their world and use words to describe what they think and wonder about.  This collection is meant to stimulate curiosity and develop vocabulary with the youngest learners. There are conversation starters among the images, but be sure to let the child's interest and your own questions drive the discussion. 

Combine these images with real-world examples from your child's books, toys, or your own community. If you're interested in learning more about an individual image, click on the "i" icon located in the top left to view the museum description. 

This has been adapted from the Project Zero's “See Think Wonder" Visible Thinking routine, meant for exploring works of art and other interesting things.

A free printable version is included at the end of the collection. 

#visiblethinking

Cody Coltharp
17
 

Looking Closely at Surrealist Art: Cundo Bermúdez's "Cinco Figuras"

This teaching collection focuses on the surrealist artwork of Cuban artist, Cundo Bermúdez (1914-2008), entitled "Cinco Figuras" from the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum's collections. By applying the Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine, "See, Think, Wonder" to the artwork, teachers can lead students in a discussion that allows them to make observations and support interpretations with details, while noting areas for further exploration. 

Additional resources are included in this collection to help contextualize the artist, his life and other related works. 

Keywords: surrealism, Latino, painting, symbolism, ladder, mirror, clock, five figures

#LatinoHAC #VisibleThinking


Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Activity Collection: Botany Field Book

This teaching guide includes a lesson plan originally published as "Smithsonian in Your Classroom." It introduces students to the work of botanists and botanical illustrators. The students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of Smithsonian artists. Also included here is an additional optional resource: "Meet the Artist" to discover more about Smithsonian Botanical Illustrator Alice Tangerini.



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

#visiblethinking

Teresa Maddox
15
 

Digital Technology and You: Scrolling along the Electronic Superhighway

This collection will facilitate a series of activities combined into a short unit encouraging students to consider the development of digital technology  and their relationships to it through Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii by Nam June Paik. It will consist of several activities that will require class time, as well as time to compose, draft, and revise an argumentative essay. My intention is to make this series of activities fairly flexible. I could imagine completing these activities in about a week (five 50-minute class periods), or taking as much as three weeks to get all the way through with supplementation - maybe of other pieces of a similar aesthetic - and time in class to write. 

The collection has internal instructions on several of the pieces that are designed to be used either in the classroom or by students independently at home - feel free to change them or disregard them. 

For a more detailed rundown of what I have in mind for this lesson, please see the lesson concept write-up in the collection. 

#SAAMteach #visiblethinking

Mathieu Debic
22
 

Head of State – Power and Authority or Propaganda?

In this collection the theme is "Head of State". Students are to question representation of in terms of power, authority and or propaganda. Included are Houdon's bust of Washington as well as his full length statue; the statue Augustus of Primaporta; and Greenough's statue of George Washington. This collection was created for AP Art History, however it can be used in lower level art history and art appreciation classes as well.

The premise is that students should be able to analyze the differences between two or more styles in terms of composition, choice of subject matter, proportion, color, and so on. Understanding the distinction between styles is especially important in French art (Houdon), where the inheritors of these artistic traditions will become the earliest modernists. Furthermore, artists in the new United States of America tried to capture the spirit of their fledgling republic in their art, but comparing the art of the young nation (Greenough) with that of its European antecedents (Augustus of Primaporta) reveals strong influences as exemplified here.

In addition, students need to be able to answer several key questions when looking and writing about works of art: Why do the historical contexts of the images inform our view of the person depicted? How does the depiction reinforce the image? What message is conveyed in the sculptures? What is the relationship between those portrayed? Finally, how do the works of art relate to specific cultures and the time period in which they were made?

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Summer Teacher Institute. #NPGTeach #visiblethinking

Jennifer Hendricks
11
 

Visual Connections between Buddhism and Ancient Greece

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity investigates the cultural connections between Ancient Greece, Rome, and Gandhara* as seen through a sculpture of the Buddha, created in the 2nd century CE. Buddhist sculptures from Gandhara are significant, not only because they show the extent of Alexander the Great's influence on Asia, but also because they are some of the first human depictions of the Buddha in the history of Buddhist art.

Even without a deep knowledge of the art of this period, students can make visual observations and comparisons that reveal the blending of Asian and Greco-Roman culture in this particular region.

*Gandhara is a region in what is now modern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Keywords: greek, kushan, mathura, india, inquiry strategy, classical, roman, gautama, siddhārtha, siddhartha, shakyamuni, lakshanas, signs of the buddha

#visiblethinking

Tess Porter
6
 

Key Moments in WWII: What makes you say that?

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "What makes you say that?," students will investigate two photographs, taken from different angles, of Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and General Yoshijiro Umezu aboard the USS Missouri as they signed the surrender that would officially end WWII.

Keywords: world war 2, world war ii, general macarthur, carl mydans, primary source, ww2, japanese instrument of surrender, potsdam declaration, inquiry strategy

#visiblethinking

Tess Porter
4
 

Caught in the Folds

Students will look at geometry in origami as an inspiration to art, design, and innovations in science.

Using selected Issey Miyake’s fashion designs and connections to origami this Learning Lab Collection will highlight artworks that are designed in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) forms, how to plan/engineer for complexity, and how combinations make a difference in the end product.

Description

Student Instructions

Teacher Notes

Slide 1: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Tank

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz

Encourage students to watch the video more than once.

Slide 2: 2D paper crane

Read about history of the paper crane and cultural significance.

These two slides are visualizations that can help students make connections between origami and Miyake’s work.

Slide 3: 3D paper crane

Slide 4: Origami instructions for paper crane.

Make the crane twice.

One version keep in the 3D form

Second version: Unfold and analyze the line features. If you need to you can use a ruler to accent the lines.

Identify the parallel line properties, types of angles, and any special features of the folds.

Extensions: Make connections between the folds and the aspects of the crane.

Slide 5: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Long Skirt

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz, and sketch a rough draft of the 2D plan for the skirt.

Students can watch the video of the skirt a couple of times, answer the questions in the quiz and sketch the skirt. Remind the students that it does not have to be perfect. The goal is to identify the shapes used.

Slide 6: In-Ei Mendori

Students will interview each other and make predictions of what the 2D version of the sculpture will look like.

It is important that they complete the quiz before advancing to the next slide.

Slide 7: In-Ei Mendori

Students will evaluate their prediction of the sculpture.

Possible point for class discussion.

Slide 8: Thinking routine

With your group members answer the questions for one of the Miyake designs.

Slide 9: 40 under 40: Erik Demaine

Watch the video of folding.

Read Erik Dermaine’s short biography and research interests

Students will read about Dermaine’s interests and do some research on the applications of geometry.

Slide 10: Science Innovations

Watch the video on science innovations.

Lead a discussion on the aspects of origami and the importance in problem solving in science.

EXTENSIONS

Slide 11: Fold it website

Connections between biology and origami.

Read through the website and use the folding tool.

Students could make proteins with origami paper and analyse the different line properties and relationships that are on the paper after unfolded.

Additional resources

Documentary on origami- teachers can watch for more background information or use clips during the lesson. 

Article: http://www.opb.org/artsandlife...

#visiblethinking

Amanda Riske
12
 

Environmental Stewardship through Art

This collection was designed for elementary classes to infuse global competencies into an established study of open space and environmental stewardship.  Birds are often a topic of study in primary classrooms, and this framework can help students start thinking about environmental stewardship through an initial study of birds. Guided by thinking routines, students examine birds and think about how other cultures have shown their interest in nature. They will also start thinking about why studying the needs of local birds is important to taking care of their local environment. Finally, students begin to explore why taking care of the birds and environment also might be important to the world.

This collection is meant to be used as a unit over several days. Please feel free to copy and adapt it for your own use. 

The art used in this collection comes from the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery collections. Many pieces were featured in an exhibition called "Dream Worlds: Modern Japanese Prints and Paintings from the Robert O. Muller Collection", which was on view November 2004-January 2005.

Tags: birds, environmental stewardship, open space, thinking routines, global competency, essential questions, human impact, Japan, Japanese art, Ohara Koson, woodblock printing, seasons, cherry blossoms, teacher, student, nature, crow, heron, magpie, pheasant, artful thinking

#visiblethinking

Eveleen Eaton
12
 

Do Ho Suh: Almost Home

Do Ho Suh’s immersive architectural installations—unexpectedly crafted with ethereal fabric—are spaces that are at once deeply familiar and profoundly alien. Suh is internationally renowned for his “fabric architecture” sculptures that explore the global nature of contemporary identity as well as memory, migration, and our ideas of home.

Suh was born in Korea and moved to the United States at the age of 29 in 1991, and he currently lives between New York, London, and Seoul. He crafts his works using traditional Korean sewing techniques combined with 3-D modeling and mapping technologies. Suh sees these works as “suitcase homes,” so lightweight and portable they can be installed almost anywhere.

Essential Questions:

  • What is home?
  • How does perspective-taking help us better understand people, events, or issues?
  • How can artwork be used as a provocation for the exercise of higher order thinking and transdisciplinary application of content?

Created for a program with the National Teachers of the Year on April 30, 2018.

#NTOY18

#visiblethinking

Phoebe Hillemann
13
 

See Think Wonder: Images of Girls

How can we think about gender through cultural and social lenses? This image gallery invites students to explore gender identity. Using artful looking techniques, students can think critically about how girls are depicted around the world. This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, "See Think Wonder" for exploring works of art. This strategy encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry. 

Keywords: girl, woman, gender, identity, culture, history, advertisements, sculpture, art, anthropology

#visiblethinking

sheishistoric
24
 

See/Think/Wonder: Progressive Era Women Seek Equal Political Rights (Protest)

Objectives:

Students will use primary sources to understand the ways that women advocated for the right to vote.

Students will Explain actions taken during the Progressive era to expand the right to vote for women.

Essential Question: What do these photographs tell us about the use of protest by the Women's suffrage movement?

#visiblethinking

Scott Karavlan
6
 

Japanese Internment through Art and Documents

These resources can be used in an activity that introduces a lesson on Japanese-American Internment during World War II.

1. To begin, show students Roger Shimomura's painting entitled Diary: December 12, 1941. Without providing any background information, use the "Claim, Support, Question" routine to have students make claims about what they think is going on in the artwork, identify visual support for their claims, and share the questions they have about the painting. Document responses in three columns on large chart paper or a whiteboard.

2. Following this initial conversation, share the title, artist's name, and date of the painting. Ask students to consider the date in the title, and discuss what significance this date might have. If they don't figure out that this date was five days after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, share that information. Share with students that this painting is part of a series Roger Shimomura created based on the wartime diary entries of his grandmother, Toku, who was born in Japan and immigrated to Seattle, Washington in 1912. Along with thousands of other people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast during World War II , Toku and her family were forcibly relocated to an internment camp after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Roger was a young boy during World War II, and remembers spending his third birthday in the Puyallup Assembly Center on the Washington state fairgrounds, where his family was sent before being transferred to Minidoka Reservation in Idaho for the duration of the war.

3. Jigsaw Activity, Pt. 1. After sharing this context, tell students they will each be receiving a primary source document that relates to the painting in some way. Distribute copies of "Woman at Writing Table," the Superman comic, the Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry, and Toku Shimomura's diary entries. Divide students into four groups, one per document. Give students time to analyze their document as a group and discuss how it affects their interpretation of the painting.

4. Jigsaw Activity, Pt. 2. Next, create new groups so that each group includes students who received each of the four sources. Ask students to briefly report on their document and what their original group discussed as its possible meaning and relation to Roger Shimomura's painting.

5. Return to the painting as a large group, and discuss how the primary source documents have influenced students' reading of the artwork.

6. Optional additional resource: If time allows, have students watch excerpts from Roger Shimomura's artist talk at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

#APA2018

#visiblethinking

Phoebe Hillemann
8
 

Unlikely friendships

"Culture is often difficult to define, but it influences everything from who you are as an individual to how you relate to other people at home and around the world. " from Cultural Conversations (2014)

Cultural conversations have been important to the development of the United States since its inception. To start cultural conversations among my students, I have gathered a collection of artifacts that give a brief history of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. Douglass and Lincoln would ordinarily have not been friends,  but because of their relationship, history was changed forever! Other Friendships worth investigating: WEB DuBois and Woodrow Wilson (as well as William Monroe Trotter), Lyndon B Johnson and Martin Luther King, Jr., Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Banneker, and Eleanor Roosevelt and Mary McLeod Bethune.

#NPGteach

#visiblethinking


Jeryl Payne
25
 

Activity Collection: Botany Field Book

This teaching guide includes a lesson plan originally published as "Smithsonian in Your Classroom." It introduces students to the work of botanists and botanical illustrators. The students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of Smithsonian artists. Also included here is an additional optional resource: "Meet the Artist" to discover more about Smithsonian Botanical Illustrator Alice Tangerini.



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

#visiblethinking

Cody Coltharp
15
 

What makes you say that?: Marian Anderson in Concert at the Lincoln Memorial

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine for interpretation with justification. This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. The strategy is paired with photographs from the National Museum of American History, an artwork from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and a video from the Smithsonian Music initiative, featuring a curator from the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Using guided questions, students will look at a single event through multiple media formats.

Tags: William H. Johnson, Robert Scurlock, Marian Anderson, Easter 1939 concert, Lincoln Memorial

#visiblethinking

Ashley Naranjo
5
 

What Makes You Say That?: Interpretation with Justification Routine with an Artwork

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, highlighting interpretation with justification. The strategy is paired with an artwork from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Once you have examined the artwork and answered the questions, view an archived webinar with a museum educator to compare your interpretation. How does viewing the artwork with the museum label change your interpretation? How did what you noticed in the artwork compare with what the educators shared?

Suggestions for teachers regarding visual clues for this image are in the "Notes to Other Users" section.

#visiblethinking

Ashley Naranjo
3
 

Cultural Series: Five Pillars of Islam

What can we learn about people from their cultural artifacts? The Five Pillars of Islam are unifying principles of the faith by which all Muslims abide. They are: Profession of Faith (Shahada), Prayer (Salat), Alms (Zakat), Fasting (Sawm), and Pilgrimage to Mecca (The Hajj). Look through the collection. What's going on? Identify an artifact that represents a pillar. What do you see that makes you say that? Explain what pillar you think it represents, and explain why. Bonus activity: Complete the sorting activity. What did you know about the Five Pillars before you began the activity? Did you learn anything new? What do you think now about observing the Five Pillars?

Tags: Islam, Muslim, religion, Muhammad, object analysis, practice, pilgrimage, hajj, fasting, Ramadan, Shahada, zakat, tithe, salat, prayer, cultural literacy

The original collection and idea was created by Kate Harris, SCLDA.

#visiblethinking

Tracie Spinale
26
 

Portrait Analysis: Duke Kahanamoku

In this activity, students will analyze a stamp depicting Duke Kahanamoku to explore his significance in American history and culture. Duke Kahanamoku (1890-1968) transformed the Polynesian pastime of surfing into a worldwide competitive sport.  He also won five Olympic medals in swimming, was an accomplished actor and businessman, and was re-elected sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu for thirteen consecutive terms.  Opportunities to learn more include a photograph of him with Amelia Earhart and her husband, a surfboard he carved, and a Google Doodle created for his 125th birthday.

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying Duke Kahanamoku's life and achievements, Hawaiian history and culture, and more.  This activity opens with questions from the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators and ends with a Project Zero Think / Puzzle / Explore routine; the full portraiture guide and routine instructions are located at the end of the collection.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: surfer, pacific islander, athlete, hawaii, hawai'i

#APA2018

#visiblethinking

Tess Porter
11
 

Photography and Image Manipulation

Guiding Questions:

What should a photograph look like?

Why might someone want to alter, change, or edit a photograph? What is the goal?

What are the ethical considerations regarding image manipulation?

Time- 1-2 class periods with optional extension activities

This collection includes images related to the topic of image manipulation and artistic photography, and includes a lesson plan for teachers as well as images and students activities related to media literacy across the curriculum. The collection of images and articles is designed to facilitate conversations around how and why images might be manipulated and for what purpose. Discussion questions and thinking routines allow for students to critically analyze the images as whole group and in small groups to consider why and how a photographer or artist might alter an image. Extension activities and resources are also included.

Day 1:

Warm Up/ Engagement:

What should a photograph look like?

Have students do a think-pair-share together addressing the question. Alternatively, this could be done as a silent chalk talk.

Debrief as a group.

Background:

Discuss:

Why might someone want to alter, change, or edit a photograph? What is the goal?

Have you ever altered or changed a photograph? How? Why? (Think Shapchat, Instagram, Photoshop, etc.)

Is it ever a problem to manipulate a photography? Why?

As critical viewers of media and images, students should always consider the audience and purpose of photographs. For example, an artistic photograph doesn’t have the same audience or purpose as a journalistic photograph.

Explain to students:

We’re going to look closely at the work of two photographers (Jerry Uelsmann and Robert Weingarten) to see how photographers might manipulate their images (digitally or otherwise), why they might do this, and the effect it has on the viewer.

Close Looking:

Lead students through a discussion of one of Uelsmann’s images by looking closely at one image as a group using the Visible Thinking routine, “See Think Wonder.”

Discuss the photographer’s likely message, audience and purpose of the image. Then have students consider how Uelsmann might have created the image.

Then, read an article about Jerry Uelsmann in Smithsonian Magazine, “Before Photoshop.”

Debrief the article and have students journal on their reactions to Uelsmann’s quote, “The camera is a license to explore.”

Alternatively, students can read and discuss the article,"Photography Changes What We Think 'Reality' Looks Like."

Have students share responses with the group as a closing activity.

Day 2

Warm-Up: Recap learning/connections from last class.

Explain that in today’s class we’ll consider the work of another artist and photographer, Robert Weingarten. Weingarten’s work is a “non-traditional” form of portraiture. Before looking at his images, have students brainstorm their ideas on what is a portrait. Students could engage in the 3-2-1 Bridge Routine on this topic.

Close Looking:

Lead students through a discussion of one of Weingarten’s  images by looking closely at one image as a group using the Visible Thinking routine, “Zoom-In.” After looking at the image as a whole, have students consider the image as as whole using the “Connect-Extend-Challenge” routine.

Weingarten’s portraits of Colin Powell and Celia Cruz are linked in the collection.

Discuss the photographer’s likely message, audience and purpose of the image. Then have students consider how Weingarten might have created the image.

After discussing the image, watch the video about Weingarten’s process.  

If time allows, group students into small groups to visually compare/contrast the works of Uelsmann and Weingarten on chart paper.

Exit Ticket:

How do these photographs change your understanding of photography and what can be done with images?

I used to think…

Now I think….

Possible Extension Activities:

Have students create a composite image (surreal landscapes or portraits)  inspired by Robert Weingarten or Jerry Uelsmann with their own photographs and Photoshop.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmwrWCMdYqI

Have students explore other historical images that have been manipulated (intentionally or unintentionally) that are included in the collection.

Article on historical image manipulation from the ClickIt Exhibit

Have students look at the ethical issues in digitally manipulating photographs

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/retouching-reality-9-12

Have students consider other ways in which the evolution of technology has influenced the images we create.

Using Agency By Design, a design thinking framework, have students complete the following activities:

Parts-Purposes- Complexities Routine-- Digital Camera

Take-Apart Activity w/ digital cameras/analog camera

Have students research different topics in the history of photography including camera obscura, daguerreotype process, Muybridge and moving images, and Kodak.

Readings/Videos:

Additional reading on Uelsmann:

https://www.digitalphotopro.com/profiles/jerry-uelsmann-the-alchemist/

#visiblethinking

Allie Wilding
29
 

Photography and News

Guiding Questions:

  • How much of a story can a photo tell? What are the limits?
  • Why do journalists take photos?
  • How is news photography different than other types of photography? What is photojournalism?

Time- 1-2 class periods with optional extension activities

This collection provides an opportunity for students to consider a first impression of news photos through careful image analysis. The initial viewing of the image is followed by reading historical newspaper articles or other primary sources about the event in question to compare their thinking with some context to their initial impressions. Images can be powerful and can greatly influence our impression of events, but without context, we can form inaccurate impressions based on our own biases. Students need to be careful and critical viewers of media as well as media creators. Images include events covered in history/social studies courses such as the Civil Rights Movement, Little Rock Nine, World War II, Japanese internment,  9/11, the Detroit Riots, the Scopes trial, women’s suffrage, Dolores Huerta and United Farm Workers, and the Vietnam War.

Day 1:

Warm Up/ Engagement:

Have students journal or a mind-map about the following questions:

  • How much of a story can a photo tell? What are the limits?
  • Why do journalists take photos?
  • What is photojournalism?
  • How is news photography different than other types of photography?

Have them do a Think-Pair-Share

Debrief as a whole group

As a whole group, discuss the photo of the female students who integrated Central High School in Little Rock. Do not show the caption to students. The global competency thinking routine, “Unveiling Stories,” is good to use for news or other current event photos because it allows students the opportunity to explore multiple layers of meaning.

Once students have discussed the image, show them the caption. Then give additional background on the Little Rock Nine. To review/background on the Little Rock Nine, consider exploring resources from Facing History and Ourselves. There is a New York Times article listed below as well.

Next, go back and look at photo with the caption and see how the initial understanding has shifted with the Connect-Extend-Challenge routine. This is a thinking routine that is great for connecting new ideas to prior knowledge.

Day 2

Have students read the article from the Click! Exhibit, “Photography Changes How We Read the World.”

After reading, lead students through the What Makes You Say That? Routine which encourages interpretation with justification and evidence.

Small Group Jigsaw activity

In pairs or small groups, assign one image in the collection to each group. Make sure they know they will present their findings to the whole class. Have them go through the “Unveiling Stories” routine with their new image. Give students 10 mins to record their thoughts and ideas on chart paper or sticky notes. Next, give each group the related primary source news article (listed below through ProQuest) or your choice of a primary source. Have students read the article together. Then, have them go back to the image and do the Connect-Extend-Challenge routine while visualizing their thinking on the same chart paper or with additional sticky notes.

Have each group share out and summarize their findings from their initial reaction to how their thinking changed after reading an additional primary source.

As a final debrief, make sure that students reflect on their learning from their image analysis.

A great reflection routine is “I used to think… Now I think…”. Have students complete this routine with the topic of photojournalism/news photography.

Extensions

Readings:

Audio:

Exhibit:

Project:

  • Report on an event with images and in writing  

Companion Article Sources on ProQuest Historical Newspapers:

For 9/11 Photos-

A CREEPING HORROR

KLEINFIELD N R

New York Times (1923-Current file); Sep 12, 2001;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. A1

For D-Day Photo:

Allies Seize Beachheads on French Coast, Invasion Forces Drive Toward Interior

By the War Editor of The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor (1908-Current file); Jun 6, 1944; ProQuest Historical Newspapers Christian Science Monitor (1908 - 2001) pg. 1

For Detroit Riot Photo:

Detroit Is Swept by Rioting and Fires; Romney Calls In Guard; 700 Arrested

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jul 24, 1967;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Vietnam Withdrawal Photo:

A Farewell to Vietnam: 2 Flown Out Tell Story

New York Times (1923-Current file); Apr 28, 1975;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Dolores Huerta Photo:

Farm Labor Law Chances Improve

By Susan Jacoby Washington Post Staff Writer

The Washington Post, Times Herald (1959-1973); May 2, 1969; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Washington Post (1877 - 1998) pg. A24

For Little Rock Photo:

STUDENTS ACCEPT NEGROES CALMLY

By BENJAMIN FINE Special to The New York Times.

New York Times (1923-Current file); Sep 26, 1957;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011)

For WWII/D-Day Photos:

PARADE OF PLANES CARRIES INVADERS

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jun 6, 1944;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Scopes Trial Photo:

DEFENSE CASE IS OUTLINED

Special to The New York Times.

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jul 16, 1925;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Women’s Suffrage March Photo: WOMEN PARADE FOR SUFFRAGE AT CAPITAL

The Christian Science Monitor (1908-Current file); Mar 3, 1913; ProQuest Historical Newspapers Christian Science Monitor (1908 - 2001) pg. 1

#visiblethinking


Allie Wilding
21
 

China's Terracotta Army: Exploring Artistic Practices

In this activity, students will analyze figures from the Terracotta Army, made for China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE), in order to explore the artistic practices of a newly unified China during the Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE). Students will explore the elements of art and principles of design used in the terracotta warrior figures before designing their own papercraft terracotta warrior.

The Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta warriors and horses, was created for Emperor Qin Shihuang to form a small part of his elaborate tomb complex. These figures are significant not only because of their artistic realism, detail, and diversity, but also because of their rarity – the majority of surviving objects from this time period have been found in Emperor Qin Shihuang's tomb complex.

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; see wonder connect; project zero; visible thinking routine; strategy; maker; art making; papercraft; terra cotta; shihuangdi; shi huangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

#visiblethinking

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
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