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Found 139 Collections

 

Exploring Identity through Portraiture

Exploring Identity through Portraiture explores the ways in which artists and sitters use portraiture as a means to convey individual, community/cultural, and national identity. By analyzing portraits, including self-portraits, students will consider how the artists tell the sitters’ stories, paying attention to how the artists’ choices reveal some—but perhaps not all—aspects of the sitters’ identity. Students will explore how portraiture can be an avenue that they can use to represent their own identities and make meaning of what is important to them.


Curriculum Connections: This lesson plan is suitable for students in grades 4-12 Civics and Visual Arts classes. 


Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to: 

• Examine how modern and contemporary artists use portraiture to reveal aspects of a sitter’s individual, community/cultural, and national identity. 

• Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what one can learn about the sitter through these components. 

• Discuss the artistic choices that portrait artists make and consider how such decisions can reveal the artists’ viewpoints and also influence the viewers’ understanding of the sitters’ identity. 

• Use the museum’s collection as a gateway to investigating and exploring one’s own individual, community/cultural, and national identity.

#NPGteach

Nicole Vance
68
 

We the People: Who are We as an American People?

We the People: Who are We as an American People? explores the ways in which artists and sitters use portraiture as a means to convey American history and identity. Students will learn about American geography, culture, civilization, symbols, and the Civil War through the faces of the people who have shaped the United States of America.

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Nicole Vance
96
 

Color Our Collections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Caitlin Blake
23
 

Visualizing Democracy

This Learning Lab complements the National Portrait Gallery's student program, Visualizing Democracy. 

Students will visualize democracy from the colonial era to the 21st century by analyzing portraits of major figures who played a critical role—as government officials, engaged citizens, or both—in creating a democratic society for the United States. Students will investigate how portraiture can convey democratic ideals and how, as a cultural institution housed in a historic building, the National Portrait Gallery has been and continues to be relevant to American democracy.

#NPGteach


Kita McCord
19
 

Exploring Ava DuVernay's "Selma": History as Visual Culture

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

#NPGTeach


Special thanks to National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), the National Museum of American History (NMAH), Smithsonian Folkways, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) for inspiring this learning lab and for their resources.

Keywords: Portraiture, African American, American, Selma, Alabama, visual art, Civil Rights Movement, United States, visual literacy

Ashleigh Coren
46
 

Art, Creative Writing, and Public Speaking: A Portraiture Workshop for the ELL Classroom

Art, Creative Writing, and Public Speaking: A Portraiture Workshop for the ELL Classroom

This collection includes instructions and documentation of a replicable art-based program for English Language Learners (ELLs). The information included can be adapted for high school students and speakers of any language, including native English speakers. Activities were designed to foster in participants important skills such as visual literacy, public speaking, creative writing, art appreciation, collaborative learning, and advocacy, and also to develop empathy, confidence, and self-esteem. 

Keywords: ESL, ESOL, portraits, migration, immigration, stories, identity, monologues

#NPGteach

Philippa Rappoport
51
 

In Mid-Sentence at the National Portrait Gallery

Photographs are often replete with words that remain unheard. “In Mid-Sentence” presents a selection of photographs from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery’s collection that depict moments of communication: intimate confessions, public speeches, exchanged jokes, political confrontations, lectures and more. Photographs featured in this exhibition encapsulate pivotal moments, such as John F. Kennedy’s televised speech for the 1960 Democratic National Convention or Walter Cronkite’s clandestine 1971 meeting with Daniel Ellsberg at the time of the publication of the “Pentagon Papers.” The exhibition provides the missing script for these otherwise silent voices, granting another means for understanding these interactions by placing them within their socio-historical contexts. The exhibition is curated by Leslie Ureña, associate curator of photographs, National Portrait Gallery.

#NPGTeach

Briana White
25
 

#BecauseOfHerStory: Exploring Untold Stories through Portraiture and American Art

Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

RELATED WEBINAR SERIES (recordings available): https://americanart.si.edu/education/k-12/professional-development/webinars

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Phoebe Hillemann
19
 

NPG Women's History Workshop

Practice using portraiture to explore the importance of American women in the history of art and design, science, politics, and beyond. Take a deep dive into this collection which addresses the relationship between history, art, and biography and their connections to the theme of extraordinary women in history.

#NPGTeach

Ashleigh Coren
41
 

When Marian Sang: Using Portraiture for Pre-reading and Post-reading Activities

In this collection, portraits are used for both pre-reading and post-reading activities in connection with reading a biography of Marian Anderson. The pre-reading activity uses Betsy Graves Reyneau's oil on canvas portrait, Marian Anderson, to begin to reveal Anderson to students. Post-reading activities include the use of photographs, video and William H. Johnson's oil on paperboard Marian Anderson to enhance understanding of Anderson's 1939 concert and to informally access student learning.  

When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson: The Voice of a Century is a picture book written by Pam Munoz Ryan and illustrated by Brian Selznick. This biography shares the story of opera star Marian Anderson's historic concert of 1939 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to an integrated crowd of over 75,000 people. The book recounts Marian's life as a she trains to become an opera singer and as she struggles with the obstacles she faces in pre-Civil Rights America. This picture book is an excellent choice to use in the upper elementary classroom in the context of a unit that focuses on "challenges and obstacles."

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGteach

Katie Oxnard
8
 

REMAKING THE RULES: EXPLORING WOMEN WHO BROKE BARRIERS

How have women created space for themselves in the arts and culture?

This collection features resources related to the December 5, 2019, professional development webinar, "Remaking the Rules:  Exploring Women Who Broke Barriers," hosted by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  This joint webinar is one of three in the series A Woman’s Place Is in the Curriculum: Women’s History through American Art and Portraiture. Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory

Anne Showalter
13
 

PERSISTING AND RESISTING: EXPLORING WOMEN AS ACTIVISTS

How have women led the way in activism and social justice movements? 

This collection features resources related to the October 8, 2019, professional development webinar, "Persisting and Resisting: Exploring Women as Activists," hosted by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  This joint webinar is one of three in the series A Woman’s Place Is in the Curriculum: Women’s History through American Art and Portraiture. Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website.
#BecauseOfHerStory


Anne Showalter
14
 

WHO TELLS YOUR STORY? EXPLORING WOMEN AND IDENTITY

Women’s identities are complex, intersecting with race, class, sexuality, etc., and have often been overlooked or erased from history. What is the importance of being able to express yourself and voice your story? 

This collection features resources related to the November 7, 2019, professional development webinar, "Who Tells Your Story? Exploring Women and Identity," hosted by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  This joint webinar is one of three in the series A Woman’s Place Is in the Curriculum: Women’s History through American Art and Portraiture. Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Anne Showalter
25
 

Curation...The Latest (and Equally Important!) C for Education

This collection is a curated collection of images that can be used with a lesson plan on curation. Each of the images has some possible connection to a social justice theme and the question asked by the creator of the collection is, "How might we approach conversations about curation and social justice?" Each of these images adds a unique and interesting dimension to a conversation about curation, the people whose stories are selected for view, and how those stories are empowered and/or disempowered by the stories that they are surrounded by. How do we make decisions about these topics? What do we do when we are asked to include in a curated collection pieces that change the story we might want to tell? How do we deal with the multi-faceted stories and sometimes contradictory stories of the people we select for our collections? 

It is important to ask these questions and have dialogues with students about how we come to our conclusions, make our decisions, and wrestle with these concepts. In a world of tweets and ever expanding stories/information it is important sometimes to talk about how we work with the realities of physical spaces where there isn't always enough wall real estate to highlight everyone all of the time. In those situations, how decisions are made, who is brought to the forefront (and who is not), and how our own beliefs/biases/views of the world play into those decisions all matter. 

How might you curate this collection in many ways? Who is still missing and why does it matter that we ask the questions at all? 

While this is intended to be a companion collection to a lesson on curation, the questions above may stand on their own. This collection is intended to be the beginning of a conversation, and not a stand alone collection; however, the lesson is also available in the collection as a downloadable PDF. 

#NPGTeach

Sean Wybrant
40
 

Found Poems and Social Justice: Using Rosa Parks and other sources to create found poems about social justice

This collection includes portraits from the National Portrait Gallery, websites, links to Smithsonian Magazine articles, and other news articles all relating to issues of social justice. #NPGteach

Jan Rubenstein
26
 

Crafting Newspaper Headlines for Civil War Art

This lesson will be completed halfway through a choice historical fiction unit highlighting books from the eras of naturalism and realism during the Civil War.  With background knowledge of the historical eras and content knowledge of one of the four possible books they will now jump into the picture and write a newspaper article.  The must be able to imagine where in their text they would place this article.  They are ultimately creating a group primary source for their choice book in completing this task.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
16
 

Exploring Fear with the Dark Romantics

This lesson would be taught at the end of the dark romantic literature unit.  After exploring the traits of the era, students will be tasked with writing their own haunting story to mimic the authors we've read.  They will use Fritz Eichenberg's"Dream of Reason" and a see-think-wonder activity as their starting point and inspiration.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
12
 

Dismissing the Dead White Guy

This collection explores the necessity, logic, and fairness of the inclusion and/or exclusion of people of history based on gender and/or race. 

Lessons include

Looking Using the Puzzle Strategy

Looking using several various strategies. 

Easily customization by simply using as an individual or group lesson or by requiring all, some, or one of the additional group portraits.

Researching People and Inventions

Recognizing Bias and Objective Analysis

Understanding the Difference Between Bias and Prejudice

Argumentative Essay Writing (Designed as a timed writing for AP Lang, but the prompt could easily be turned into a formal writing assignment. 


#NPGteach

Deborah Eades
15
 

Portraiture and the Rhetorical Triangle

Subject: AP Language, Rhetorical Analysis

This collection features portraits (some that can be used for comparing and contrasting) for studying and practicing usage of the rhetorical triangle.  Students may also SOAPSTone the images.  

Objectives:

  • Students will observe different portraits.
  • Students will analyze different portraits using the rhetorical triangle.  
  • Students will recall lessons from history to apply background knowledge to the analysis.  

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.  

#NPGTeach



Mai Khanh Nguyen
16
 

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence

Take a close look at the portraits and objects within “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. “Votes for Women” outlines the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. This Learning Module highlights figures such as Lucy Stone and Alice Paul, but also sheds light on the racial struggles of the suffrage movement and how African American women, often excluded by white women from the main suffrage organizations, organized for citizenship rights (including the right to vote).

#NPGteach

#BecauseOfHerStory

Nicole Vance
46
 

Edward O. Wilson: Ant Biologist

What is an entomologist? Through the study of the Edward O. Wilson portrait, our students will explore the career of an ant biologist, study the plants and insects in our community, and create a self-portrait demonstrating their understanding.

Objectives: 

  • Students will be able to define the role of an entomologist.
  • Students will understand the concept of biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to classify a living creature as "insect" or "not an insect."
  • Students will observe and be able to describe local insects.
  • Students will understand the concept of habitat.
  • Students will observe and be able to describe  native plants.

Assessment: Students will create a self-portrait with a variety of native insects and plants similar to the E. O. Wilson portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019

#NPGteach

Jill Johnson
8
 

Practicing Transcendentalism by Drawing with Words

This activity will be completed at the end of a transcendentalism unit in American literature.  Students will be tasked with studying a landscape, drawing the landscape, and filling it in with words.  After the initial activity students will be given a template where they can choose how to show their transcendentalist pastiche through words, colors, quotations, etc.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
9
 

Modernizing Revolutionary Literature with the Founding Fathers

This lesson would be completed at the end of our revolutionary literature unit.  This will ask the students to physically pose as the founding fathers, view the descendants' commercial, study the descendants' portrait, view an interview about the commercial, and then finally draft a letter to the founding fathers updating them on their work.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
8
 

Analyzing Character and Motivation in the Crucible

This activity will be completed at the end of The Crucible before watching the documentary Central Park Five about a modern day witch hunt.  By completing the puzzle activity with an image from the Salem Witch Trials, the McCarthy Hearings, and the Central Park Five Court Case, students will find the common characters and motivations for which to focus in on the film.  Their culminating task will be to jump into the portrait and write a letter home to their parents, sibling, or best friend.  They will then be tasked with doing the same task each of the three days of the documentary.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
7
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