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Found 13 Collections

 

STEAM Learning: Beauty and Truth in Science and Art

Overview: Within the new realm of STEAM learning, students explore transdisciplinary themes connecting Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math in new ways, finding similarities and differences.  The overall goal of STEAM learning is to link the subjects for 21st century career paths.

Use this lesson as a provocation to a unit on planet Earth, our solar system, and/or space and the human interaction within those topics. This will get students thinking about how we translate the world around us and motivate them to dig deep when researching.

Use the thinking routine: Beauty and Truth for an engaging discussion with students. The discussions will help you assess students’ prior knowledge of space, Earth, and our solar system.

Purpose:  In this lesson students explore their knowledge of science and art. Students are asked to make connections with the two as they use a Project Zero thinking routine: Beauty and Truth. This lesson can be adapted to students Grades 5-12 to work collaboratively and enhance their communication skills within the regular classrooms or Design Thinking and Maker Space learning workshops when available.

History connections: This collection offers a historical perspective of the synergistic role of art and sciences for innovations used for human exploration both on Earth and in space. The images and artifacts have been selected to capture science and art from the early 20th century to current times.

Directions: In order to allow student led learning, model the activity (described below), then allow the students to explore the activity. The very last resource in the collection is a video entitled “Heaven and Earth”. Use this as a tool for a reflection discussion in the beginning and end of your lesson. Please feel free to modify the lesson. Note that it is imperative to discuss Science and Art before and after the lesson to show the growth of understanding from beginning to end. 

A sample discussion to get students thinking about how to describe art and science can use the following questions: "Where do you see art in these images? What, to you, makes it "art"? Where do you see science? What, to you makes it "science"? Let's look deeper, could you say that what you thought was art could have aspects of science? What could make it science? And now the opposite, could you say that what you thought was science could have aspects of art? What could make it art?" As a teacher, document the descriptions on the board for the students to see the words they are using. Create a Venn diagram of the words used, each circle being science or art with the overlap being similar descriptions. Use your personal style to dig deep in the discussion, working on the students' abilities to communicate effectively and with metaphors. Highlight when they use powerful metaphors or challenge them to make associations when speaking to best express themselves. 

Teacher will demonstrate a sample first: Choose two images (Art and Science): one that you think best demonstrates concepts in science that you are interested in and one that best demonstrates art concepts that you are interested in.  Please explore the artifact by exploring the tabs that display more information about the piece. 

The teacher demonstrates the thinking routine to analyze the images: Beauty and Truth. Document both beauty and truth evidence for each image. Compare the list and see if there are similarities. Then the students pair up to do the same: choose two images and explore Beauty and Truth for each image. Have them chart using 4 squares to get the beauty and truth observations for each of the two images. After, share out their findings and have a reflection discussion for any similarities amongst students. The main goal is to have the students realize on their own that science and art overlap in many ways, and that beauty and truth can be extracted from each. 

The purpose of first exploring science vs. art and then beauty and truth is to increase the sophistication of the discussion and students' abilities to communicate effectively and clearly. After all four words are analyzed for the two images, students will have both exercised their communicative abilities and their reasoning of the world around us created and real. This challenges their point of view of the world around them and calibrates their critical reasoning skills. 

This should lead some rich discussions as well as powerful creative expression and scientific reasoning. These are the skills that students need to analyze the world around them to further extend their STEM skills and best prepare for the 21st century workforce. Take your time to use this as a platform for discussion in your classroom and continue to have student discuss their perceptions of the world. 

Learning Integrations:

  • Literacy: Have the students write a persuasive paragraph that promotes either of the images as more beauty or truth with multiple reasons why and concrete examples to demonstrate.
  • Science: Have the students research more about the science they observed. You can even combine literacy by having them complete a technical article where they place themselves within that time period of the scientific discovery and write a “Breaking News” article telling the general public about the amazing new science discovery.
  • History: Create a timeline for 5-10 images. Discuss the progression of discovery and innovation. Discuss the impact on society and humans.

Learning Extensions:

  • Use design thinking to extend the learning. Pretend there will be a circus coming to town that gets everyone excited about STEAM. Use graphic design tools to combine both images and create a promotional poster.
  • Create a model or diorama of the scientific discovery.

Let the learning take you on an STEAM adventure.

Enjoy this lesson!

Ages: Grades 5-12, scope per ability

Learning objectives:

  • Students understand the similarities and differences of science and art.
  • Students learn historic scientific discoveries.
  • NGSS - Use these objectives after using this lesson as a provocation to learn about our Earth, the Universe, and the solar system. Sample science units can include the following learning standards:
    • MS-ESS1-2 Earth's Place in the Universe

    • Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.  Grade: Middle School (6-8)
    • HS-ESS1-1 Earth's Place in the Universe

    • Develop a model based on evidence to illustrate the life span of the sun and the role of nuclear fusion in the sun’s core to release energy that eventually reaches Earth in the form of radiation.  Grade: High School (9-12)
    • HS-ESS1-2 Earth's Place in the Universe

    • Construct an explanation of the Big Bang theory based on astronomical evidence of light spectra, motion of distant galaxies, and composition of matter in the universe.  Grade: High School (9-12)

Cultural Connections - Global Perspectives

  • Investigating the world: With prompting and support, I can ask a question about an idea that is important to my community.
  • Recognizing perspectives: With prompting and support, I can identify when someone else has an idea that is different from my own.
  • Communicate Ideas: I can speak and write to share my ideas with others. This means with help I can look at my audience, speak loudly and clearly, and share my ideas so that my audience can understand them.

#GoGlobal #STEAM #STEM #designthinking #makeractivity

Sandra Vilevac
47
 

Design Case Study: Eone Bradley Timepiece

Explore the design story behind the Bradley Timepiece in Cooper Hewitt's collection and learn about empathy, creative problem solving, inclusive design, and the design process used to bring it to life.

Objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with the design process
  • Understand what the steps of the design process might look like in application 
  • Connect design objects to the design process

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
12
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

2018 National High School Design Competition

This Learning Lab was created as a resource for students and teachers participating in the 2018 National High School Design Competition.

This year's competition challenges students to make the everyday accessible by considering a place, process, or object they regularly use, identifying a challenge that a user with a disability might have with it, and designing a solution that addresses that challenge and makes the place, process, or object more accessible for all.

For more details on the competition go to https://www.cooperhewitt.org/2...

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
44
 

Ideas to Solutions with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

How do you help students test their ideas in your classroom? A critical step in the design process, prototyping and testing ideas helps problem-solvers learn from failures, experiment with materials, and visualize their solutions. Educators will dive into a case study from Michael Graves Architecture and Design and explore various techniques to experiment with ideas in the classroom with resources from professional designers and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

#NTOY18 #CHEDUCATION #CHDESIGNTHINKING

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
43
 

Brainstorming

Use this collection to help jumpstart your brainstorming process.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
13
 

Designers are Problem Solvers-Teacher Resource Collection

Designers are inspired by problems! With a defined problem as a starting point, designers find solutions through a design process that includes empathizing with the user, brainstorming ideas and prototyping solutions. At Cooper Hewitt, your class will see the design process in action during a deep exploration of various objects featured in our permanent and temporary exhibitions. Students will also experience the design process in a hands-on, interactive workshop where they will work collaboratively to solve problems through design thinking.

Program objectives:

  • Students will be able to define key design process terminology including define, empathize, brainstorm, prototype, test, and launch.
  • Students will understand the user’s role in the designer’s process
  • Students will understand that a designer’s choice of materials inform the form and function of a design.

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
21
 

WHAT IS DESIGN THINKING?

 This Learning Lab explores the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum's design thinking process. Design Thinking is a methodology used to solve complex problems and fosters creative confidence. It allows the problem-solver to pursue multiple ideas, research solutions, make connections, empathize with the end-user, test ideas and improve concepts.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
20
 

Defining Problems

The Cooper Hewitt Process Lab gives Museum visitors first hand experiences with the design process. Pivotal to this process is the identification and defining of a challenge or opportunity in relation to a user. The resources in this learning lab explore socially responsible design to engage, empathize, and help envision a better America.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
21
 

Empathy

This Learning Lab explores Empathy through Tova Kleiner's winning entry to the 2017 National High School Design Competition. Students were challenged to design a solution that improves a community's access to healthy, fresh foods.  Tova's design delivers fresh produce to seniors and homebound people. Produce is sourced from local farmers and markets, packaged into a special divided container based on longevity, and delivered weekly by students.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
17
 

Designing For Accessibility–Tova Kleiner

This Learning Lab showcases different examples of accessible design in order to provide a fuller understanding of what designing for accessibility can look like. The collection shown here includes designs that address physical, cognitive, and emotional barriers that impact the lives of people with disabilities. This Learning Lab explores design for the blind, for wheelchair accessibility, for the elderly, and for people with autism. Through the DesignPrep Scholars program, I have learned about various design disciplines and focuses. DesignPrep Scholars gave me the opportunity to meet several inspirational designers and do many design projects. Throughout this experience, I have been especially drawn to design that is inclusive and accessible. This Learning Lab is the culmination of my work at DesignPrep Scholars and displays what I have learned about accessible design.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
22
 

Emotions: Expression

Ability to comprehend and express emotions via color -- journeys from the initial discovery and acceptance of multiple emotions to a various selection of emotions itself. People make conscious choices in the creation of art; colors can correlate to emotions and designers make these choices purposely. 

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
18
 

Fonts and Feelings - Ai Hashimoto

There's a lot you can get out of font design, one of those is feelings. As a reflection on the various design concepts I have explored at Cooper Hewitt with the Design Scholars, I created a Learning Lab on how the fonts in our everyday lives are connected to the feelings that we portray in our writing. I have pulled resources from designers I have met throughout the DesignPrep Program, including designs from Cooper Hewitt, the Smithsonian, and myself. Below you will see a collection of 10 images (each with a description on the connection to feelings) including a video "Wicked Problems in Type Design" that you can explore.

 ***The descriptions written by me may not depict what the actual designer intended their audience to feel, but they are my interpretation (except for my 2 pieces), so please feel free to build off of or have your own interpretation 

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
11