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Meet Four Women Who Made History #BecauseOfHerStory

Smithsonian Institution
Celia Cruz, Angela Davis, Mia Hamm, and Kitty Cone are American women who spoke out and broke barriers. In this new video miniseries, students interviewed Smithsonian staff to learn about these remarkable women who shaped our world today. Explore the objects featured in this video: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/four-women-who-made-american-history/WgpT9RgKNPrmTYXz#r Learn more women’s history with the Smithsonian: https://womenshistory.si.edu/ Drawing on the Smithsonian’s unique and vast resources, Because of Her Story creates, disseminates, and amplifies the historical record of the accomplishments of American women.

How Did Kitty Cone Change Disability Rights? #BecauseOfHerStory

Smithsonian Institution
In 1977, 13 years before the Americans with Disabilities Act, Kitty Cone and other disability rights activists occupied a federal building in San Francisco. They demanded the government protect their rights. Ren, a student, speaks with Katherine Ott, curator at the Smithsonian’s @National Museum of American History, about why Cone’s work matters. See the “504 Unchained” t-shirt and learn more the Section 504 protests: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/how-did-kitty-cone-change-disability-rights/e6EFy7DGaMn5PCaX#r Learn more women’s history with the Smithsonian: https://womenshistory.si.edu/ Drawing on the Smithsonian’s unique and vast resources, Because of Her Story creates, disseminates, and amplifies the historical record of the accomplishments of American women. Other photo credits: Photo of Kitty Cone and reporters courtesy of the Center for Independent Living; additional photographs by HolLynn D'Lil, author of Becoming Real in 24 Days.

How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement? #BecauseOfHerStory

Smithsonian Institution
In 1970, activist Angela Davis was charged with murder. A movement arose to free her, and her time in jail inspired her to work to change the prison system. Kemi, a student, talks with Kelly Elaine Navies, oral historian at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (@NMAAHC). Explore the objects featured in this video: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/how-did-angela-davis-inspire-a-movement/xbytwehfbnrmkmlb# Learn more women’s history with the Smithsonian: https://womenshistory.si.edu/ Drawing on the Smithsonian’s unique and vast resources, Because of Her Story creates, disseminates, and amplifies the historical record of the accomplishments of American women.

How Did Mia Hamm Inspire Women to Play Sports? #BecauseOfHerStory

Smithsonian Institution
Mia Hamm helped popularize soccer in the U.S. and inspired a new generation of athletes. Kamau, a student, speaks with Eric Jentsch, curator at the Smithsonian’s@National Museum of American History, about Hamm's legacy. See Mia Hamm’s jersey and learn more: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/how-did-mia-hamm-inspire-more-women-to-play-sports/ctGUE5nmj0hns2TJ# Learn more women’s history with the Smithsonian: https://womenshistory.si.edu/ Drawing on the Smithsonian’s unique and vast resources, Because of Her Story seeks to deepen our knowledge and appreciation of women’s contributions to American society. #BecauseOfHerStory Additional photo credits: Photo by David E. Klutho /Sports Illustrated via Getty Images; Andy Lyons /Allsport.

Why Is Celia Cruz Called the Queen of Salsa? #BecauseOfHerStory

Smithsonian Institution
Celia Cruz celebrated her Cuban American identity as one of the first women salsa singers. Mincy, a student, speaks with Ariana A. Curtis, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (@NMAAHC). Explore the objects featured in this video: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/why-is-celia-cruz-called-the-queen-of-salsa/cnUm6mVfkCHFp7ox# Learn more women’s history with the Smithsonian: https://womenshistory.si.edu/ Drawing on the Smithsonian’s unique and vast resources, Because of Her Story creates, disseminates, and amplifies the historical record of the accomplishments of American women.

Leadership and Change #BecauseofHerStory: Smithsonian Affiliations National Conference 2019 Keynote

Smithsonian Education
Conference Welcome, Myriam Springuel, Director, Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and Smithsonian Affiliations Opening remarks about the Smithsonian's American Women's History Initiative from Julissa Marenco, Assistant Secretary for Communications and External Affairs, Smithsonian Institution In Conversation: Ellen Stofan, John and Adrienne Mars Director, Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum (NASM) will speak with Brenda Gaines, Smithsonian National Board Member and Advisory Board Chair at the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) about leadership, creating change, and nurturing the next generation. Dr. Stofan will provide insights on ways in which she is leading the National Air and Space Museum as it revitalizes and reimagines the museum, and its national presence. As the first woman to lead NASM, Ellen Stofan is no stranger to leading change. She served as NASA’s chief scientist, developed plans to bring humans to Mars, and worked on science policy with President Obama’s science advisor and the National Science and Technology Council. Brenda Gaines retired as President and CEO of Citicorp Diners Club, a member of Citigroup, and served as Deputy Chief of Staff to Chicago's Mayor Harold Washington and as Commissioner of the Department of Housing for the City of Chicago.

Wiki + Affiliates: Help Represent the Under-Represented!

Smithsonian Affiliates

Wikipedia is created and edited by volunteers around the world—and Affiliates can help! As one of the web’s most visited reference sites, Wikipedia serves as a starting point for many individuals looking to learn about art, history, and science. Smithsonian Affiliations and the Smithsonian’s new Open Knowledge Coordinator,* Kelly Doyle, are looking for Affiliate partners […]

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