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Found 5,446,340 Resources

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase (2)

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase, Bronze

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vases (2)

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vases, A Pair

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flowerpot

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Stoneware

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hanging Betty" Miner's Tunnel Lamp

National Museum of American History
This miner’s tunnel lamp was known as a hanging Betty. The hanging Betty was used in the early 19th century, and was an improvement on the hanging open lamp. A wick holder was added to channel the wick drippings back into the bowl, and an oil cover was added to confine heat, decrease smoke, and make the oil burn more efficiently. German immigrants living in Pennsylvania called this kind of lamp “besser” meaning better, which produced the nickname Betty.

"Hanging Betty" Miner's Tunnel Lamp

National Museum of American History
This miner’s tunnel lamp was known as a hanging Betty. The hanging Betty was used in the early 19th century, and was an improvement on the hanging open lamp. A wick holder was added to channel the wick drippings back into the bowl, and an oil cover was added to confine heat, decrease smoke, and make the oil burn more efficiently. German immigrants living in Pennsylvania called this kind of lamp “besser” meaning better, which produced the nickname Betty.

"Hanging Betty" Miner's Tunnel Lamp

National Museum of American History
This miner’s tunnel lamp was known as a hanging Betty. The hanging Betty was used in the early 19th century, and was an improvement on the hanging open lamp. A wick holder was added to channel the wick drippings back into the bowl, and an oil cover was added to confine heat, decrease smoke, and make the oil burn more efficiently. German immigrants living in Pennsylvania called this kind of lamp “besser” meaning better, which produced the nickname Betty.

"Hanri" Cooking-Pot

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hansel & Gretel" Cookie Cutter Set

National Museum of American History

"Happi" - Coat

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Happiness Is"

National Museum of American History

"Happy Birthday to You" Could Soon Have Its Day in the Public Domain

Smithsonian Magazine

It’s a staple of birthday parties around the world, but for the past two years a battle has been raging over who owns the song “Happy Birthday to You.” Now, some recently uncovered documents might just free the Birthday Song from copyright and put it in the public domain.

Originally composed by Patty and Mildred Hill in the late 19th century, the copyright has been owned by Warner/Chappell Music for almost 30 years, writes Michael E. Miller for the Washington Post. Since purchasing the song in 1988, Warner/Chappell has aggressively defended their copyright, going so far as to sue the Girl Scouts for publicly singing the song in 1996. While it’s become something of a joke in the film and television world, there’s big money in the Birthday Song, to the tune of $2 million a year in licensing fees.

For most of that time the copyright went unchallenged, with most choosing to either pay for the rights or to compose their own birthday song. Documentarian Jennifer Nelson did the same in 2013, when she paid $1,500 for the rights to use footage of people singing “Happy Birthday to You” in a film she was making about the song’s history. But as she did more research, she became more and more skeptical of Warner/Chappell’s claim to the song, Miller writes. So she sued them.

“I felt that there was legitimate reason to take action and not just let this be an industry joke,” Nelson said in a 2014 video about the lawsuit. “So here I am...I just saw something that was inherently wrong and we all joked about it and laughed about it and didn’t do anything about. But then I realized we could do something about it and I did.”

For the last two years, Nelson has been fighting Warner/Chappell in California district court. A judge was set to deliver a ruling this summer, but on July 13 Warner/Chappell submitted more than 500 pages of new documents — including an “illegibly blurred” copy of “Happy Birthday to You” from a 1927 songbook Nelson and her team had never seen before. After a flurry of digging, Nelson uncovered a 1922 version of the book with a crucial difference – there was no copyright listed.

Nelson says this proves that the Birthday Song has been in the public domain for almost a century, calling it “a proverbial smoking gun,” Miller writes. Lawyers representing Warner/Chappell denied hiding any documents in court and argued that the “special permission” granted in 1922 doesn’t nullify the original copyright.

Judge George H. King considered the new evidence in during a hearing on July 29. Soon enough, people around the world may be able to sing “Happy Birthday to You” without fear of being sued.

"Happy Days Are Here Again"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Happy Days Are Here Again,” with music by Milton Ager and words by Jack Yellen. It was published by Ager, Yellen and Brownstein, Inc. in New York, New York in 1929. The song was featured in the 1930 Metro-Goldwyn Pre-Code romantic musical film Chasing Rainbows, directed by Charles Reisner and starred Bessie Love and Charles King, Jack Benny, Marie Dressler, and Eddie Phillips.

"Happy Days Are Here Again"

National Museum of American History
This player roll was made by PlaRola Corporation in Easton, Maryland, undetermined date. It is for a PlayRola player harmonica, roll P-228 “Happy Days Are Here Again.” The roll is made of perforated paper wound on a plastic spool with original paper box. This roll sold for 15¢.

"Happy Disgust" Is a Newly Recognized Human Facial Expression

Smithsonian Magazine

There are 43 muscles in the human face, so it's no wonder that the range of emotions expressed by those muscles extends well beyond the six reseachers tend to focus on—"happy sad, fearful, angry, surprised and disgusted," according to the Guardian. And now researchers have identified 21 "emotional states" and their corresponding human facial expressions.

Researchers used a computer program to analyze the faces of 230 volunteers. These 21 expressions, the researchers found, were more or less universal among the group, NPR reports. Some were hybrids of basic emotional states, like happily disgusted (i.e., when you watch The Aristrocrats) or sadly angry (i.e., when you discover your signficant other is cheating on you). 

The volunteers were all American, NPR points out, so at this point the team doesn't know whether or not happily disgusted is a distinctly North American expression or a universal human experience. 

"Happy Father" with twins

National Museum of American History

"Happy" Mardi Gras cup

Anacostia Community Museum

"Hara-Pin" Eel-Catcher

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hard Cider" Cane, 1840

National Museum of American History
A critical remark made by a Democratic newspaperman gave birth to the log cabin and the hard cider barrel as Whig symbols to promote the candidacy of William Henry Harrison. The newspaperman wrote that Harrison’s rivals could easily “get rid of” the old general with “a barrel of hard cider, and settle a pension of two thousand a year on him, and my word for it, he will sit the remainder of his days in his log cabin by the side of a ‘sea coal’ fire and study moral philosophy.” Though the Democratic press reprinted the suggestion as a cutting remark, Harrison’s Whig friends embraced the everyday attributes of log cabins and hard cider and the symbols soon appeared on various campaign objects including this cane from 1840.

"Harp" Spooner

National Museum of American History

"Harvest" kachina

National Museum of the American Indian

"Hata" Ladle

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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