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"Hall of News Reporting" Exhibit at NMHT

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by National Museum of History and Technology, Office of the Director.

"Hall of News Reporting" exhibit at the National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT), now known as the National Museum of American History, featuring documentation of news gathering, reporting, printing, and distribution processes.

"Hallelujah, I'm a Bum"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Hallelujah, I’m A Bum,” version by Jack Waite. It was published by Bibo, Bloedon and Lang in New York, New York in 1928. This version of this American folk song contains 15 verses.

"Hallelujah, I'm a Bum"

Smithsonian Magazine

In a journey back to the world of the hobo, James R. Chiles describes life in the hobo jungles, the struggle to escape from angry "bulls" (railroad police), the difference between "bums" and "yeggs" and "tramps," and what it was like to hop a freight. "I grab it as tight as I can," a young hobo recalls. "I think my arms will be jerked out of their sockets." Hoboes had their own do's and don'ts, Chiles reports. Stealing from the general public was kept to a minimum. It might be OK to filch a piece of pie or a clean shirt from a laundry line, but breaking into someone's house was an extremely serious offense--it might lead friendly householders to stop giving back porch meals in return for splitting wood or carrying water.

Restless and displaced veterans began riding the rails soon after the Civil War, as more and more railroads were extended west, but Chiles' account concentrates on the Depression era when hoboes became something of a national preoccupation. In the 1870s there were only 53,000 miles of railroad track. By 1930 there were 230,000. In the 1890s stories generally described men on the bum as "demented vagrants" or "depraved savages" or "symbols of primitive evil." But in the 1930s Americans sympathized; one in five of the able-bodied population was out of work. Besides, the public had fallen in love with Charlie Chaplin as the touching Little Tramp; and in 1941 a celebrated film, Sullivan's Travels, with Joel McCrea and Veronica Lake, made people understand what it was like to ride the rails, and to face the world as down-and-outers.

Hoboes are often thought of as losers, but Chiles notes that included among them at various times were such future notables as novelist Louis L'Amour, oil billionaire H. L. Hunt, journalist Eric Sevareid and Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas. Included also was Chiles himself, who, some years back, rode the rails briefly to get a taste of hobo life.

"Ham" the Chimpanzee; Dr. Theodore H. Reed; "Princess" the Lioness; "Mohini Rewa" the White Tiger

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Frame selections featured in "The Torch," March 1966.

"Ham" the chimpanzee; Portrait of Dr. Theodore H. Reed, director of National Zoological Park; "Princess" the lioness; "Mohini Rewa" the white tiger and her cub.

"Hamatsa" Headring

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
From card: "Front represents "Milky Way, side, the fabulous? A "hamatsa" head ring (see Boas, USNM AR 1895, p. 437ff) Illustrated in Boas p. 442, fig. 63 also in USNM AR, 1888, Pl. 18, fig. 70, p. 272."

"Hamilton" Pocket watch

National Museum of American History

"Hamons Court" Neon Sign

National Museum of American History
The Hamons family business exemplifies the culture of roadside communities that sprang up as long-distance automobile travel increased. Carl and Lucille Hamons lived on Carl's mother's farm until the late 1930s, when they moved to the town of Hydro, Oklahoma. In 1941 they used Carl's inheritance to purchase a gasoline station with seven tourist cabins at Provine, a sparsely settled crossroads on Route 66 one mile southwest of Hydro. Neighboring businesses included a Texaco station and the Hill Top Café. Carl drove a truck for a living, and Lucille operated the gas station and cabins. They lived in the second story of the gas station; Lucille prepared breakfast and sandwiches for travelers on a hotplate in the first story. Lucille lived in the gas station until her death in 2000.

Social interaction in communities like Provine differed greatly from traditional villages. Strangers on the move were brought together briefly in a remote, ephemeral setting. This was a culture of mobility; motor travel was the only reason for Provine's existence. In her autobiography, Lucille describes the isolation of her gas station home, her frequent interaction with travelers on Route 66, and her travel-oriented duties and services in addition to running the gas station and cabins. She helped travelers in financial straits by accepting objects for payment or by purchasing their cars and putting the travelers on a bus. During World War II, when rubber and metal were in short supply, she sold tires and parts stripped from the used cars that she had bought.

Lucille witnessed the second wave of migration on Route 66 in the early 1940s, when midwesterners sought defense jobs in California, as well as postwar vacation trips and household moves. In recent years, as interest in the historical and cultural aspects of Route 66 has grown, Mrs. Hamons has been celebrated as the "Mother of the Mother Road." Her gas station was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. Cheryl Hamons Nowka, who was born in the second story of the gas station, created a Lucille Hamons web site in the mid-1990s.

"Hana-ike" Flower-Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
From Card: "Kutani stone ware of fine grey clay covered with a white glaze. Form: the body is a double cylinder; the inside one tight and the outside one openwork in two bands. The upper one is of intersecting lines ovals and the lower one of stretched netting. The shoulder is almost at a right angle, the neck large and short with a very flaringlip. Decorated with butterfly and fruit in relief on the shoulder, and flowers, foliage, and conventional designs in red, green, and brown over the glaze. Old and rare (see Audsley and Bowes "Keramic [sic] art of Japan"). No mark"

"Hand Ax"

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hand Of Fatma" Amulet

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Handeh-pahchu, a young Mandan Indian" Mar 1834

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogate produced from reference copy print

Original water color from life, March, 1834 at Fort Clark.

Copy (1954) from Bodmer in Maximilian, 1843. Vig. 24.

Black and white copy negative

"Handling" ZIP Code Video

National Postal Museum
"Handling" ZIP Code Campaign Public Service Announcement Video produced by the Post Office Department, mid-1960s. Transcript: http://npm.si.edu/zipcodecampaign/video/handling_zip_code_video.pdf

"Handwerk," Wallpaper Design

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
All motifs relating to handwork. From upper left: compass, open book, footed bowl, tea pot; middle left: quill pen and ink, pot with initials TP on front (presumably for Tommi Parzinger), bell on chain dated 1930, recorder and guitar, horn with tassel; lower left: plate decorated with leaf design, stylized horse painting and a large flower with leaves; right margin: orange and mauve samples with inscription (graphite) of how colors are mixed.

"Hane Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane Ike" Flower Vase, Bronze

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Pot

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
Object was labeled in blue ink (ball point pen?) with number 92589, which is obviously an incorrect number (that number is supposed to be a tent pin, and was deacessioned in 1901). However, the vase exactly matches the very detailed description of a vase on the card for 93629, and no other vase was inventoried with that number.

One of two identical vases. From Card: "Satusma stoneware, made of fine grey glay covered with a creamy white crackle. Form: a circular convex base, a short large stem with a globular body in the lower section and above that an inverted baloon shaped body. Decorated with birds, flowers, foliage, etc. in gold and red, green and brown enamel. No mark."

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Hane-Ike" Flower Vase

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
This vase had a barcode tag with the number 92589, which is obviously an incorrect number (that number is supposed to be a tent pin, and was deacessioned in 1901). However, the vase exactly matches the very detailed description of a vase on the card for 93629, and no other vase was inventoried with that number.

One of two vases, identical except that the base of this one has been broken and repaired. From Card: "Satusma stoneware, made of fine grey glay covered with a creamy white crackle. Form: a circular convex base, a short large stem with a globular body in the lower section and above that an inverted baloon shaped body. Decorated with birds, flowers, foliage, etc. in gold and red, green and brown enamel. No mark."
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