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Found 600 Collections

 

Marine Science Concepts Review

You can use this site to review for the common final exam that you will take at the end of the year. 

Ellen Doyle
1
 

Tung Yee Peng Mangrove Forrest

Ani Flandreau i3
4
 
 

Marine ecosystems

cameron harris
5
 

Apothecaries in Colonial Times

       This is a collection of apothecaries in Colonial America. Apothecaries in Colonial America had far more abilities other than selling drugs, medicine, and medical advice. Doctors in apothecaries performed surgeries, trained apprentices to become surgeons, midwifing, and concocted medications. Death rates were high during the beginning of Colonial America; however, as the years progress, people begin to discover new ways to help with illnesses. So, this collection of artifacts are meant to represent the medical history and advancements in Colonial times.

       Throughout this collection, you will see many various things such as: medical tools, the apothecaries themselves, medicine containers, medical techniques, and the medicine itself.

1st Picture: This glass bottle was used to store medicine in.

2nd Picture: Workers in apothecaries knew they had to store and preserve medicine and special medicinal liquids, so to prevent anything from getting stolen they kept it in a safe-keeping box.

3rd Picture: This was a special yet common medicinal herb called, Yarrow. It was used to help aid in the female menstrual cycle, wounds, and childbirth.

4th Picture: This picture is an example of a technique a doctor in an apothecary would use to diagnose illnesses.

5th Picture: This bottle was used to distill plant oils (i.e. such as yarrow) for their medicinal use.

6th Picture: This picture shows a common thing used by people that works in the apothecaries. Mortar and pestles were used to grinding up herbs.

7th Picture: This picture depicts how apprentices made medicine. Apprentices had to use recipe books to make all the medicines and herbal potions.

8th Picture: This jar represents a common practice in apothecaries. This leech jar contained leeches for doctors to use, because they believed if they drained the blood of an ill person, it could drain their illness with it.

9th Picture: This document shows how an apothecary could actually be established. This gave permission for the apothecary to make and sell medicines, and help people be cured against all types of human illnesses.

10th Picture: This is a picture of what the interior of what an apothecary looked like.

11th Picture: This is a special type of pottery used for apothecaries, because it has a glassy outer coating to prevent liquids from soaking through.



Esther Pak
11
 

Lagoon. Etang De Tau

Ani Flandreau i3
3
 

The Universe: An Introduction

Explore the observable universe. Think about the size of space and where we fit in.

This lesson features an issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, Minecraft: Education Edition extensions, and is part of the 2017 Museum Day Live! STEM Challenge.

DOWNLOAD THE PDF TO COMPLETE THIS LESSON.

Museum Day Live!
12
 

Medince

         Medicine has be changing lives for centuries.In the early 1700's to the late 1800's  they were not as advance as we are now. They has lots of problems when it came to medicine and surgical procedures.For example they were not as sanitary as we are now.In fact in the 1800's they used herbs such as calomel which they thought  we make their patients feel better but actually caused them to get worst. Around the 1700 they came up with vaccination that will protect them from small pox.In the beginning of the 1800's they invented blood transfusion. Around 1846 they made anesthetic for patients so they will be unconscious during the operation and make it easier for the surgeons to do their operation on the patient with out them being in pain.

             As we go further into the the 1800's you see them become more advance in the technology of medicine and see them make more medical tools to help surgeons and doctors.In 1828, their was an Act that prevented unskilled doctors from being able to practice surgery or other health-related practices. This act left many communities without a doctor, making it hard for people to receive fast medical care. During the 1800's Surgery killed as many as it cured, mostly due to a disease or an infection.Also another thing during this time was that male doctors were not allowed to look at a naked women due to modesty  which  is where we got our midwives from. Their jobs were to help the women during birth or help them with abortions. Midwives were used as medicine because they did a lot more than just deliver babies, they gave support to the soon to be mothers and acted or distracted them from their pain. In the 1800's they haired black women slaves because they were immune to many diseases 

Jocelyn Romero
10
 

Lake Michigan

Ani Flandreau i3
5
 

Hurricanes

Students will use the See/Think/Wonder strategy to make inferences about Hurricanes. 

Danielle Friend
5
 

Animals in Nature

Look at each scene of animals in nature and think about what they could be doing. What do you see? What do you think is happening or is going to happen? What does it make you wonder?

Katie Grywczynski
4
 

Destination Moon: NASA Art

Established in 1962, the NASA Artists Cooperation Program gave several artists unrestricted access to several NASA facilities. The goal was to communicate the emotional tone and the cultural significance of space exploration.

This collection uses the "Connect Extend Challenge" visible thinking strategy developed by Project Zero at Harvard University. This strategy encourages students to make connections between new ideas and prior knowledge. It also encourages them to make a personal connection to an artwork or topic.

This lesson helps teachers create connections between works of art and the study of space exploration, and to help teachers use art as a force for developing students’ critical thinking.  

Observe and discuss the first image as a class. Use the "Connect Extend Challenge" to discuss the image as a class. Ask the following: 

  • How is the artwork or object connected to something you know about?
  • What new ideas or impressions do you have that extended your thinking in new directions?
  • What is challenging or confusing? What do you wonder about?

Provide any background knowledge that enhances the conversation, using the metadata information about the NASA Artists Cooperation Program. 

Next, divide the students into 4 groups. Have them use the same questions to discuss one of the 4 images that deals the Apollo 11 launch. Wrap-up the discussion by having each group share out key thoughts and responses. Repeat the same process with the 4 images that represent Mission Control (note, Mission Control Images are from a selection of Apollo missions). 

Finally, students should choose one of the final 4 images to investigate, using the "Connect Extend Challenge" to guide their exploration. Their work could be shared verbally in a paired group, or written as a personal essay. 


Christina Ferwerda
13
 

Photograph Analysis: "Moon Man" Image of Buzz Aldrin

This topical collection includes the iconic "Moon Man" image of astronaut Buzz Aldrin, a National Air and Space Museum “expert annotation” video featuring a curator highlighting specific details, and other resources about the space suit and the Apollo 11 mission. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about the mission to the moon, for analysis of photographic details, or in biography projects about the astronauts.  

Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Destination Moon: Suiting Up for Space

How did the space suit come to look the way it does? From the United States Navy's Mark IV pressure suit to the Apollo AL7 model, this collection explores its evolution. Investigate the hotspots in each image, and watch the videos included. Try to put yourself in the place of an astronaut - what are their needs, and wants? 

Next, investigate the roadmap for the developing Mars One mission. How will a Mars mission differ from the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs?

After exploring the collection, see if you can redefine the "space suit" problem for the next generation of space explorers - specifically those going to Mars.  Will astronauts need more mobility? More protection? What insights did you gain from looking at this collection? Write down the problem and any critical information gained. 

Additional Activities: 

1. Come up with as many solutions as you can to the defined problem. Don't worry about testing them all - let your imagination run wild - and challenge yourself to come up with lots of different solutions. 

2. Talk with a partner to see which solution has the most merit between you both. Refine your idea based on this conversation. 

Finally, prototype! Use simple, inexpensive materials to model your design. 

Christina Ferwerda
7
 

A Plane's Purpose

This learning lab will help aid the unit plan based on engineering and design. The learning lab "A Plane's Purpose" will be used during the first of three lessons in the unit plan. 

The first lesson is where the students will learn all about the functions and purposes of certain planes. This lab can be used during and after the lesson. When used during the lesson, the instructor can use it to provide information about the planes. After the lesson, students can refer back to it on their own to help them with research, details, or ideas. 

When using the learning lab during the lesson, make sure to go over each plane and what is was used for. The last plane in the learning lab should specifically be the Douglas C-47 because it is a plane that had a variety of uses. Emphasize that the way that the C-47 was designed, allowed it to be versatile, which is why design is important when the students begin their own. With the different images of the C-47, you can show how it is used differently in each mission. At the end of the lesson, go back and review the different aircrafts and what they were used for. You can also introduce other aircrafts that have other uses that were not mentioned in the lab.

 The purpose of the lab is to help students identify details that they might want to incorporate when designing their plane. 

Samantha Tufaga
6
 

How Planes Fly

This is an introduction to the lesson series to Canvas vs. Aluminum planes. In this collection, students will be looking at different types of planes and how planes fly. The first resource is a video with Peter Jackson and learning how to fly a WWI airplane. The next four slides are different types of planes. The first two are planes from WWI and the second two are planes from WWII. The last resource is an external link to NASA's resource on the importance of the Forces of Flight meaning drag, lift, thrust, and weight. It also talks about the different dynamics of flight.  

Kaitlin Kim
6
 

Lions and Tigers Oh My

This Collection Introduces The Children to Lions and Tigers and how they are in the wild to children and encourages them to start collections of their own based on the Book "Have You Seen My Cat" by Eric Carle

Mary Alexander
18
 

Space race

This collection is supporting my research paper on the History of the Space Race and how it lead to the US successfully putting a man on the moon, a feat they have not repeated in over 40 years.

Raymond Turner
13
 

Strange and Curious Smithsonian Jobs I

This collection features articles and images on two Smithsonian experts, Carla Dove and Chris Crowe, who will be speaking at the Smithsonian Associates' Ripley Center on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. For more information and to buy tickets online, go to: http://bit.ly/2AMP8Ae.


Carla Dove is a forensic ornithologist at the Natural History Museum who focuses on snarge, which is the remains of dead birds. She will be speaking about her unusual job, and describing some of her more uncommon discoveries and the difficulties in identifying them.


While working as a bird keeper at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Chris Crowe met Walnut, an aggressive white-naped female crane who responded violently to potential mates. Walnut took an instant liking to Crowe, and the two have been great friends ever since.

Katie Lee
10
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
15
 

Strange and Curious Smithsonian Jobs I

This collection features articles and images on two Smithsonian experts, Carla Dove and Chris Crowe, who will be speaking at the Smithsonian Associates' Ripley Center on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. For more information and to buy tickets online, go to: http://bit.ly/2AMP8Ae.


Carla Dove is a forensic ornithologist at the Natural History Museum who focuses on snarge, which is the remains of dead birds. She will be speaking about her unusual job, and describing some of her more uncommon discoveries and the difficulties in identifying them.


While working as a bird keeper at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Chris Crowe met Walnut, an aggressive white-naped female crane who responded violently to potential mates. Walnut took an instant liking to Crowe, and the two have been great friends ever since.

Ryan Camire
10
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Gayle Kraus
15
 

Movement of Life Initiative: Discover What Makes Sharks Move

Our knowledge about animal movement and the processes that regulate it only begins to scratch the surface! Join the Smithsonian's Movement of Life (MoL) Initiative in their mission to advance the understanding of how all living things, big and small, move across land and seascapes to better sustain a biodiverse planet. This is the first of the MoL collections focused on discovering shark movement along the Atlantic Coast of the United States. What makes sharks move? Dive in to find out!

**Lesson plan included (with teacher strategies) that follows NGSS for 4th graders where students are the scientists, they map and analyze shark movement!

Contact Smithsonian scientist Dr. Matt Ogburn at ogburnm@si.edu for inquiries about the shark tagging project or visit his lab's website for more information! 

Cosette Larash
51
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