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October Breezes

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Time and the Fates of Man Sundial and the Moods of Time [sculpture] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Historic photo depicting sculptures in Paul Manship's Massachusetts studio garden.

Title supplied by cataloger.

Murtha, Edwin, "Paul Manship," New York: MacMillan Co., 1957, no. 375-390.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Time and the Fates of Man Sundial and the Moods of Time [sculpture] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Historic photograph depicting sculptures in Paul Manship's Massachusetts studio garden.

Murtha, Edwin, "Paul Manship," New York: MacMillan Co., 1957, no. 375-390.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Lava Eruptions of Paricutin Volcano at Night

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Image was taken by William F. Foshag, a curator of minerals at the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, while researching the development of the Paricutin volcano.

The Paricutin volcano erupted from 1943 to 1952 with several eruptive phases. In early 1943, residents near Paricutin, Mexico, about 200 miles west of Mexico City, experienced hundreds of earthquakes. On February 20, 1943, a large fissure opened in the cornfield of Dionisio and Paula Pulido, Tarascan Indians. A crater soon formed, and over the next ten years, hundreds of scientists from around the world witnessed the birth and growth of a volcano. Foshag, from the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum, and Dr. Jenaro Gonzalez Reyna from the Mexican government, spent several years at the site, observing and documenting it through field notebooks, photographs and films. This was the first time that volcanologists were able to fully document the entire life cycle of a volcano, and the numerous studies published increased understanding of volcanism in general and especially scoria cone formation.

Image of the Paricutin volcano erupting at night. A note on the back of the image states that the image was taken about 8:30 pm. Another note by the photographer explains that night "activity increased to tremendous explosions with ejections of large masses of vicious lava."

Lava Eruptions of Paricutin Volcano at Night

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Image was taken by William F. Foshag, a curator of minerals at the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, while researching the development of the Paricutin volcano.

The Paricutin volcano erupted from 1943 to 1952 with several eruptive phases. In early 1943, residents near Paricutin, Mexico, about 200 miles west of Mexico City, experienced hundreds of earthquakes. On February 20, 1943, a large fissure opened in the cornfield of Dionisio and Paula Pulido, Tarascan Indians. A crater soon formed, and over the next ten years, hundreds of scientists from around the world witnessed the birth and growth of a volcano. Foshag, from the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum, and Dr. Jenaro Gonzalez Reyna from the Mexican government, spent several years at the site, observing and documenting it through field notebooks, photographs and films. This was the first time that volcanologists were able to fully document the entire life cycle of a volcano, and the numerous studies published increased understanding of volcanism in general and especially scoria cone formation.

Image of Paricutin volcano erupting at night.

Taos--Singing in the Moonlight

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Firelight Dance, Christmas, Taos Pueblo

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Approaching Night [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Quick, Michael, "George Inness: a catalogue raisonne; volume one," Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2007, no. 240.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Glass, BW.

(Untitled) (Nightscene of Park in a City)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Enter Here

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Times Square (Budweiser)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Pueblo Moonlight

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Harbor Under the Midnight Sun

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Village in the Swamps [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Scene of Gowanda, New York.

"Charles Burchfield: Catalogue of Paintings in Public and Private Collections," Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Museum of Art," (NY: Utica, 1970), pg. 140, entry no. 765; illustrated pg. 144.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Midnight Sun, Lofoten, Norway

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Midnight Sun, Lofoten, Norway

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Lofoten, Norway--Midnight Sun

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Midnight Sun, Lofoten

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Black on Black, Pittsburgh

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Helicopter from the series History

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Levinthal began creating photographic references to the Vietnam War in 2010, spurred by the availability of a higher quality and number of toy replicas related to the conflict. Helicopter references the opening sequence from Francis Ford Coppola's iconic 1979 film Apocalypse Now, in which Huey helicopters fly in front of a massive napalm explosion. With just a few visual elements, Levinthal conjures a vivid and instantly recognizable picture of the Vietnam War.
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