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Found 6,100 Collections

 

Women's History Month Resources

In this collection you'll find a variety of resources for Women's History Month.

Philippa Rappoport
23
 

Women's History Month Family Festival

Here is a collection of videos from a Women's History Month family festival, that includes interviews and performance footage with Kathak dancer Prachi Dalal, Native American singing group Ulali, mother-daughter storyteller and artist Yona Zeldis McDonough and Malcah Zeldis, and the Georgia Tech Glee Club paying tribute to the women in the audience for Women's History Month.

Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Women's History Month

Women's History Month 

Christina Ratatori
27
 

Women's History in Indiana

This Women's History collection contains photographs, documents, and other materials from Indiana Historical Society archival collections that pertain to the history of women's rights and interests in Indiana. Some of the materials represented in this digital collection include Indianapolis Woman's Club Records, League of Women Voters of Indiana Records, Propylaeum Records, as well as other organizational records and personal papers such as those of May Wright Sewall. Materials date from the late 1800s through the present day.

Kathy Mulder
4
 

Women's History in America: Highlights Collections

In celebration of Women's History Month, this collections highlights some of the many accomplished and influential women in science, art, women's rights, and athletics throughout history. This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement Tween Tribune features for Women's History Month 2018:

 Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
64
 

Women's History in America

This is a work-in-progress Smithsonian Learning Lab collection that includes images, text, and videos intended to inspire learning about different events, accomplishments, and themes in women's history in the United States. These resources provide some examples of and context on the movement for women's suffrage, feminists and activists for women's rights, and the first women to work in male-dominated fields. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Some other collections on themes in women’s history include “National History Day: Women's Rights,” “Can you name #5WomenArtists?,“ and “Suffrage Pin: Object Analysis.”

Colleen Murdock
64
 

Women's Birth Control Issues

Having birth control on hand is a privilege women have only had recently. Birth control is insanely a controversial topic. Women should have the rights to their own bodies. But this is not the first time men have tried to control what women do. Throughout history, men have had total control over women. Control is the root issue in this instance of birth control. Humans like to exert their control over others as a display of power. Almost all of the disputes throughout history occur because one group wants to exemplify another as a lesser group. This has happened with men and women since the beginning of the history that we know. Men making sure their power is exerted onto women, who are taught to believe they are lesser, is a tale as old as time. Recently, though, modern day culture respects, even celebrates, women. Birth control is a right women have over their bodies, and it is now being researched by scientists everywhere. The major change is that women now have the freedom and the access to something that has been previously scorned. What has not changed, however, is the fact that men still want some control over what women do with themselves. In politics, birth control is controversial, and many politicians make decisions pertaining to it. Legislation passes laws either promoting or demoting birth control methods. In society, the public generally accepts that women now have rights over their bodies. So as a society, we have made exemplary paces forward, but the prospect of control is still in the back of our mind.

Maddy Reed
3
 

Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance: Asserting their own identity

Dorothy West, Zora Neale Hurston, and their contemporaries will be profiled in this unit. Lingering themes and a lasting legacy will be discussed, prompted by a contemporary work of art. #SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
3
 

Women Sports

How did the involvement of women being in sports change?

Taylor Grimes
5
 

Women Paving the Way to Mars

"One small step for man." "Boldly go where no man has gone before." These iconic gender-specific phrases don't tell the entire story. Women have been and continue to be an important part of the aerospace industry, from the first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, to human computer Katherine Johnson who helped send humans to the Moon, to Christina Koch, one of NASA's newest astronauts. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will explore the women who are helping pave the way to Mars. We will be joined by "Astronaut Abby," a 20-year-old college student who has set her sights on becoming an astronaut and the first person to step on the planet Mars. She's also the founder of the Mars Generation, a nonprofit dedicated to exciting young people about STEM education and space.

April 12, 2017

Jessica Rosenberry
12
 

Women Paving the Way to Mars

"One small step for man." "Boldly go where no man has gone before." These iconic gender-specific phrases don't tell the entire story. Women have been and continue to be an important part of the aerospace industry, from the first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, to human computer Katherine Johnson who helped send humans to the Moon, to Christina Koch, one of NASA's newest astronauts. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will explore the women who are helping pave the way to Mars. We will be joined by "Astronaut Abby," a 20-year-old college student who has set her sights on becoming an astronaut and the first person to step on the planet Mars. She's also the founder of the Mars Generation, a nonprofit dedicated to exciting young people about STEM education and space.

April 12, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Women Olympics

How did women involve themselves with the Olympics?

Danielle Kostelac
5
 

Women of Japan

Time- 2 class periods

Description:

Using the Project Zero Design Thinking routines  "Parts, People, Interaction", this activity provides an understanding of the system of gender power at stake in the representation of Chapter 34 of Tales of Genji - Kashiwagi catches sight of the third Princess.  It then looks at a modernization of the illustrations and offers a reflection on what the new feminine contemporary perspective brings to the interpretation of the Third princess story. 

In exploring the representations of the tales of Genji, students have the opportunity to discover tales that have become a standard for Japanese culture. They look at the first known literature piece written by a woman, who shares a rare and intimate perspective of a woman on a world governed by men.  Students compare the representation of the tales from the XVIth century with one from the XXth century to identify in what ways they have been interpreted.

Day 1:

Step 1: Have students sketch The tale of Genji, chapter 34; Kashiwagi catches sight of the third Princess

Step 2: Debrief as a whole group

Discuss what the students have noticed.  Do not show the caption to the students yet. The observational drawing is good to help students pay attention to details and unveil the artist's choices. It also encourages them to initiate a first interpretation.

Step 3: Parts, People, Interaction

Once students have discussed the painting, guide them through the routine "Parts, People, Interaction". 

"This thinking routine helps students slow down and look closely at a system ( here the system of gender power.) In doing so, young people are able to situate objects within systems and recognize the various people who participate—either directly or indirectly—within a particular system. 

Students also notice that a change in one aspect of the system may have both intended and unintended effects on another aspect of the system. When considering the parts, people, and interactions within a system, young people begin to notice the multitude of subsystems within systems. 

This thinking routine helps stimulate curiosity, raises questions, surfaces areas for further inquiry, and introduces systems thinking." (PZ)

Step 4: Read the PDF "More about Chapter 34" and go back to the questions 

Have students read the caption, go back and look at the painting and ask them to take notes on how their understanding has shifted from their initial interpretation.

Step 5: Debrief the "Parts, People and Interaction" routine as a whole group:

During the discussion, here are some specific question students may want to address:  

  • What does the illustration of Chapter 34, Kashiwagi catches sight of the third Princess says about the system of power gender in place at the Japanese court in the XIth century? 
  • To what extent the architecture in the painting play a role in facilitating the superiority of men? 
  • How does the system in place impact relationship between men and women?

Day 2:

Step 1: "See, Think, Wonder" - The third princess with her pet cat, Yamato Maki, 1987

Have them do a quick "See, Think, Wonder" to encourages them to reactivate prior knowledge, pay attention to details and reflect on the effects of the modernization of the illustration of The tales of Genji though manga. Identify the audience and the context of the illustration.

Step 2: Read the caption as a group - notice what is important.

Step 3: "Layers"

This routine will encourage students to refine their first analysis of the illustration by looking at it through different angles (Aesthetic, Mechanical, Connections, Narrative, Dynamic). It will allow them to draw upon their prior knowledge and consider the impact of modernization of art on the public. 

Students can work in small group and cover between 3 and 5 of the categories.

Step 4: Each group of students present their learning to the class 


Anne Leflot
7
 

Women in World War II

This collection teaches students about the changing role of women during World War II: their role in the workplace, increasing presence in the military, and participation in voluntary organizations that supported the war. Students should think about how these activities reinforced traditional notions of gender divisions while they also allowed women to experience new activities.
Jessica Rosenberry
24
 

Women in World War II

This collection teaches students about the changing role of women during World War II: their role in the workplace, increasing presence in the military, and participation in voluntary organizations that supported the war. Students should think about how these activities reinforced traditional notions of gender divisions while they also allowed women to experience new activities.
Kate Harris
23
 

Women in World War II

This collection teaches students about the changing role of women during World War II: their role in the workplace, increasing presence in the military, and participation in voluntary organizations that supported the war. Students should think about how these activities reinforced traditional notions of gender divisions while they also allowed women to experience new activities.
Maeve Nolan
24
 

Women in the White House

What roles did the First Lady's throughout the 1900s possess during the period of their husband's presidency?

Joshua Narehood
5
 

Women in the Supreme Court

Portraits and interviews
M FUGA
17
 

Women in the Great War

This collection brings together objects and resources from the National Museum of American History that consider some of the critical ways that women supported and participated in World War I. Using these artifacts and resources, engage students in a thoughtful discussion to analyze the guiding question: How did women shape the outcomes of World War I?

Additional information and resources can be found in the museum's online exhibitions The Price of Freedom: Americans at War, Advertising War: Women and the War, Modern Medicine: Women in the War, and Uniformed Women in the Great War.

#BecauseOfHerStory

National Museum of American History
20
 

Women in the Fight for Women's Rights- Nathan, Braden, and Dana

How did women fight for women's rights?

Nathan Delsanto
5
 

Women in the Civil War

The Civil War was a war in the United States from April 12, 1861 until May 13, 1865. It was between North and South over issues on slavery. Women played significant roles throughout the war as nurses, as spies, as clothes washers and menders, and as encouragers to the soldiers. Many women from the North and South disguised themselves as men and fought. Other women took on roles at home to run their households as their husbands were off at war. Often times women are overlooked when analyzing the Civil War, however without woman's help the soldiers would not have been able to make it through the war. 

 

Kaylyn Beverly
10
 

Women in Sports: Cindy Whitehead’s GN4LW Skateboard Conversation Kit Resources

A skateboarding pioneer, Cindy Whitehead turned pro at seventeen, skating both pool and half-pipe and becoming one of the top-ranked vert skaters while competing against the boys—something girls were not doing in the mid-1970s. But Whitehead had no choice but to wear boys’ shorts when competing; there were no skate products for girls in the 1970s.

She changed that in 2013 with her girl-empowered brand Girl is NOT a 4 Letter Word (GN4LW). Whitehead is especially supportive of young female skaters through the GN4LW skate team and products which are geared towards women and girls.  

Whitehead’s signature phrase printed in gold on many of the GN4LW products personifies her independent spirit, "Live life balls to the wall. Do epic sh*t. Take every dare that comes your way. You can sleep when you’re dead." 


This Learning Lab collection contains artifacts and resources that support the Conversation Kit on Cindy Whitehead's GN4LW Skateboard as part of the Smithsonian's American Women's History Initiative. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
32
 

Women in Sports

In what ways did women impact sports over time?

Madilyn Rimbey
5
169-192 of 6,100 Collections