Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(489)
(1,508)
(1,754)
(1,558)
(1,929)
(34)
(814)
(674)
(356)
(1,055)
(364)
(405)

Found 1,997 Collections

 

The Crisis Deepens and The Coming of the Civil War

This collections examines the final events that led to the outbreak of the American Civil War.

Thomas Gray
3
 

Easy PZ: See, Wonder, Connect (Theme: Conservation and Human Impact on the Environment)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "See Wonder Connect" with a group of museum resources from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, National Museum of American History and the National Postal Museum. #visiblethinking #earthoptimism

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

What makes someone a hero?

This playlist on individual action and character is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write a biography of someone of their choosing that demonstrates great individual action and character.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
66
 

Pandemics: a Comparison

World History supplemental unit resources for comparison of two global pandemics. Students choose two pandemics. Choose a tact of analysis through the lens of government intervention, or economic, or impact of healthcare industry. 

Ann Sperske
12
 

Easy PZ: See, Wonder, Connect (Theme: Sports Heroes)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "See Wonder Connect" with a group of museum resources from the National Museum of American History and the National Portrait Gallery. #visiblethinking

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
16
 

The Artist in the American Landscape

Built or natural, densely populated or sparsely inhabited, the landscape around us always affects us. Artists across the world and throughout all periods of human history have represented or incorporated landscape.

This collection uses artworks from the collection of The Rockwell Museum, a Smithsonian Affiliate museum located in Corning, NY. American art is particularly defined by landscapes since the lands America comprises are unique and diverse. In this collection we demonstrate how landscape permeates art by indigenous Americans, Hudson River School artists and contemporary artists. Explore this collection to learn how these varied representations of landscapes compare and contrast. There may be more similarities across different periods of history than you might have imagined. 

TheRockwellMuseum
19
 

National Parks Belong to Everyone

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our National Parks. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about the parks as well as listen to the sounds recorded at the parks. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
28
 

Planting earth day everyday

Intro to plants

debra sparrow
10
 

Mennie, Donald

#nmahphc

This is a selection of works from the Photographic History Collection by Donald Mennie.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: photogravure, China, architecture, sacred buildings, tombs, temple, palace, gates, memorials, farmers, wagons, commerce, tourism, gate, wall, sculpture, pack animals

NMAH Photographic History Collection
35
 

Subject: Farm Animals

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs depicting farm animals from the Photographic History Collection.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: farm animals, herd, flock, oxen, steer, cow, horse, pig, chicken, duck, donkey, sheep, ranch, farmyard, dairy farm, chicken coop, dovecote, plowing, farming

Keywords: real photo postcard, documentary photography, press photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
83
 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Virtual Tour

Take a virtual tour of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on-site art installations.

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
57
 

The Bikini Atoll and Operation Crossroads: Unveiling Stories

In this activity, students will analyze photographs documenting the exodus of Bikini islanders from Bikini Atoll prior to Operation Crossroads, a pair of nuclear weapons tests and the first detonations of nuclear devices since the bombing of Nagasaki. These photographs were taken by Carl Mydans and were published in the LIFE Magazine article, "Atomic Bomb Island," on March 25, 1946.

Using two Project Zero Global Thinking Routines - "Unveiling Stories" and "The 3 Ys" - students will analyze the stories these photographs communicate about the experiences of the Bikini islanders and America's perspective on military advancement after WWII. They will also consider the perspectives presented by these photographs, in multiple contexts from the personal to the global. Additional resources (primary sources and the original article) and information on using this collection in the classroom can by found by clicking Read More ».

Keywords: atomic testing, atomic bomb, operation crossroads, bikini islands, bikini atoll, rongerik, able test, baker test, nuclear bomb, photojournalism, inquiry strategy, global competence, global competency, 1940s, 40s, 1950s, 50s, 1960s, 60s


Jane Whitmore
17
 

Grade 3 Slow Look at Inventions in our world

Materials and scientific thinking
Slow look

inventions

Lisa Kay Faganbrown
5
 

Fences

This collection is based off the play "Fences" by August Wilson. The collection reflects the main themes, characters, and key moments in the play.

Alitzel Serrano
15
 

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence

Take a close look at the portraits and objects within “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. “Votes for Women” outlines the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. This Learning Module highlights figures such as Lucy Stone and Alice Paul, but also sheds light on the racial struggles of the suffrage movement and how African American women, often excluded by white women from the main suffrage organizations, organized for citizenship rights (including the right to vote).

#NPGteach

#BecauseOfHerStory

Nicole Vance
47
 

Art for Social Issues

These artworks take a stance on social issues such as poverty, hunger, homelessness, freedom of speech, and political oppression. How have the artists combined imagery and text to communicate their message? 

Jean-Marie Galing
9
 

The Ontario Lakers: Teamwork in Urban Environments

Did you know that Washington, DC had their very own Lakers? No, not those Lakers.

The Ontario Lakers were a community sports team based in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of Washington, DC. This collection aims to get kids thinking about teamwork and how outdoor environments can be designed to make a place for community. Discover more about the Ontario Lakers in the sources and suggested activities below.

Included here is a photograph of the Ontario Lakers playing ground, a baseball signed by the team and interviews with Mary and Ronald Pierce (sister and brother to Walter Pierce, the leader of the Ontario Lakers). The sources are from the Anacostia Community Museum and the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

  • Study the museum sources to learn about the Ontario Lakers.
  • "What's the Story" encourages students to think about the big ideas represented in the sources by analysing a sample news article and answering comprehension questions using the Harvard Project Zero thinking routines.
    • Extension task: Write an article for the your student newspaper about a team (eg. sports team, scout troop, gardening group) in your city or neighborhood or city. Does this team make your neighborhood a better place? Why? In what ways?
  • The "5W and 1 H" activity is a guided reflection on the social and emotional benefits of being part of a team.
  • By taking a walk "In Your Community," students can discover the continued relevance of the situations faced by the Ontario Lakers: how urban communities inhabit outdoor places and how common resources can build community.
  • These ideas are put into action with the "Plan a Park" activity, as students are empowered make decistions that transform their neighborhood.


#MuseumFromHome #ChildrenAsCitizens #UrbanPlanning #Environment #Baseball

Celine Romano
12
 

Planting for Earth Day

Intro to the study of Plant Growth and Earth Day

amber karichner
12
 

Subject: Meals and Eating

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to meals and eating.

Additional photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to food can be found in Learning Lab collections Food, Eateries, Agriculture, and Kitchens. 

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: Breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, dinner table, kitchen table, taking tea, drinking coffee

NMAH Photographic History Collection
81
 

Learning through Games

Coming soon! Preview:

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
9
 

The Iñupiaq People and Their Culture

By Beverly Faye Hugo (Iñupiaq), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)

Sea, Land, Rivers

There’s ice and snow, the ocean and darkness – darkness in the winter and twenty-four hours of daylight in the summer. Barrow was originally called Utqiaġvik (meaning, “the place where ukpik, the snowy owl, nests”). That’s where my people, the Iñupiat, have survived and lived, and I am doing as they have done. On the Arctic coast you can see vast distances in all directions, out over the ocean and across the land. The country is very flat, with thousands of ponds and lakes, stretching all the way to the Brooks Range in the south. It is often windy, and there are no natural windbreaks, no trees, only shrubs. Beautiful flowers grow during the brief summer season. The ocean is our garden, where we hunt the sea mammals that sustain us. Throughout the year some seasonal activity is going on. We are whaling in the spring and fall, when the bowheads migrate past Barrow, going out for seals and walrus, fishing, or hunting on the land for caribou, geese, and ducks.

Whaling crews are made up of family members and relatives, and everyone takes part. The spring is an exciting time when the whole community is focused on the whales, hoping to catch one. The number we are permitted to take each year is set by the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission and the International Whaling Commission. Whaling is not for the faint of heart. It can be dangerous and takes an incredible amount of effort – getting ready, waiting for the whales, striking and pulling and towing them. But the men go out and do it because they want to feed the community. Everyone has to work hard throughout the whaling season. People who aren’t able to go out on the ice help in other ways, such as buying supplies and gas or preparing food. You have to make clothing for them; they need warm parkas, boots, and snow pants.

We believe that a whale gives itself to a captain and crew who are worthy people, who have integrity – that is the gift of the whale. Caring for whales, even after you’ve caught them, is important. After a whale is caught and divided up, everyone can glean meat from the bones. Each gets his share, even those who don’t belong to a crew. No one is left out.

We are really noticing the effects of global warming. The shorefast ice is much thinner in spring than it used to be, and in a strong wind it will sometimes break away. If you are out on the ice, you have to be extremely conscious of changes in the wind and current so that you will not be carried off on a broken floe. We are concerned as well about the effects of offshore drilling and seismic testing by the oil companies. They try to work with the community to avoid problems, but those activities could frighten the whales and be detrimental to hunting.

 

Community and Family

Iñupiaq residents of Barrow, Wales, Point Hope, Wainwright, and other coastal communities, are the Taġiuqmiut, “people of the salt.” People who live in the interior are the Nunamiut, “people of the land.” The Nunamiut used to be nomadic, moving from camp to camp with their dog teams, hunting and fishing to take care of their families. They packed light and lived in skin tents, tracking the caribou and mountain sheep. My husband, Patrick Hugo, was one of them. For the first six years of his life his family traveled like that, but when the government built a school at Anaktuvuk Pass in 1959 they settled there.

My parents, Charlie and Mary Edwardson, were my foremost educators. They taught me my life skills and language. When I came to awareness as a young child, all the people who took care of me spoke Iñupiaq, so that was my first language. Our father would trap and hunt. We never went hungry and had the best furs for our parkas. Our mother was a fine seamstress, and we learned to sew by helping her. My mother and grandmother taught us to how to care for a family and to do things in a spirit of cooperation and harmony.

I was a child during the Bureau of Indian Affairs era, when we were punished for speaking Iñupiaq in school. My first day in class was the saddest one of my young life. I had to learn English, and that was important, but my own language is something that I value dearly and have always guarded. It is a gift from my parents and ancestors, and I want to pass it on to my children and grandchildren and anyone who wants to learn.

 

Ceremony and Celebration

Nalukataq (blanket toss) is a time of celebration when spring whaling has been successful. It is a kind of all-day picnic. People visit with friends and family at the windbreaks that the crews set up by tipping the whale boats onto their sides. At noon they serve niġliq (goose) soup, dinner rolls, and tea. At around 3:00 P.M. we have mikigaq, made of fermented whale meat, tongue, and skin. At 5:00 they serve frozen maktak (whale skin and blubber) and quaq (raw frozen fish). It’s wonderful to enjoy these foods, to talk, and catch up with everyone at the end of the busy whaling season.

Kivgik, the Messenger Feast, was held in the qargi (ceremonial house). The umialgich (whaling captains) in one community sent messengers to the leaders of another, inviting them and their families to come for days of feasting, dances, and gift giving. They exchanged great quantities of valuable things – piles of furs, sealskins filled with oil, weapons, boats, and sleds. That took place until the early years of the twentieth century, when Presbyterian missionaries suppressed our traditional ceremonies, and many of the communal qargich in the villages were closed down.

In 1988, Mayor George Ahmaogak Sr. thought it was important to revitalize some of the traditions from before the Christian era, and Kivgik was started again. Today it is held in the high school gymnasium. People come to Barrow from many different communities to take part in the dancing and maġgalak, the exchange of gifts. You give presents to people who may have helped you or to those whom you want to honor.  Kivgiq brings us together as one people, just as it did in the time of our ancestors.

Tags: Iñupiaq, Inupiaq, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska, whale, whaling, human geography

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

Local Materials: Yup'ik Ingenuity

Coming soon! Preview:

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

The Yup'ik People and Their Culture

By Alice Aluskak Rearden (Yup'ik), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)

Sea, Land, Rivers

The Yup’ik homeland in southwest Alaska extends from Bristol Bay to Norton Sound and centers on the great delta where the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers reach the sea. It is a country of treeless tundra, countless lakes and low mountain ranges. Almost seventy Yup’ik communities are situated along the Bering Sea coast and lower courses of the two rivers, including the Kuskokwim village of Napakiak, where I grew up.

Whenever I ask elders about the traditional way of life on this land, they always say, “Caperrnarqellruuq – how difficult, how daunting it was back then.” Previous generations had to master a wide range of specific knowledge that was critical to their survival. You can see the meticulous care they took in making their tools: with a harpoon, you had to know the right wood to use, where to attach the lines, and how to balance it perfectly so that it would be effective. The values they lived by—cooperation, generosity, diligence, humility and respect for others—were just as important as skill and knowledge in sustaining their communities.

The contemporary Yup’ik lifestyle is easier than the traditional one, although people still work incredibly hard to provide for their families. We have Western schooling and such amenities as store-bought goods and clothing, although the cost of those things is high in rural Alaska. The environment around us remains the primary source of what we need, but it takes less effort to subsist by hunting and fishing with the guns, snow machines and other equipment that we depend on today than it took with the equipment of the past.

My grandparents helped care for me during childhood, and they were hard-working people who taught us how to honor Yup’ik values and utilize the resources of the land. I remember my grandmother preparing and preserving the food that my grandfather brought home from the wilderness in different seasons—blackfish, whitefish, migratory birds, caribou and moose. He had a full-time job, but was an active subsistence hunter as well. My grandmother was very concerned that we never waste food. Although she did not explain it directly, I came to understand that she was concerned that such negligence would show disrespect to the animals and diminish my grandfather’s success as a hunter.

Community and Family

At a certain time a child becomes aware of life. A baby will be sitting and looking around when an expression of surprise and delight comes to her face. My mom will say “Ellangartuq – she has just become aware.” Ella is the word for awareness, but it also means weather, the world, the universe; as human beings we gradually wake up to a consciousness of all that exists. Different stages of awareness occur during a child’s growth. For that reason it is important to be extremely careful around babies; their early perceptions will shape the rest of their lives. They will be stronger people later on if they have a quiet environment where they are never startled, or scared, or exposed to inappropriate behavior.

I grew up speaking Yup’ik as my first language and was also one of the first children to benefit from the bilingual education program that was started in the Napakiak schools. From kindergarten through elementary school I took classes that were taught in Yup’ik, and during those years I learned to read and write the language. Later on I took a Yup’ik course at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and after graduation used my training to work as a Yup’ik transcriber and translator. The work was extremely difficult at first! I was not an expert in the subtleties of grammar and structure, and the speakers used terminology that was new to me. I had to ask many people about some of the words and to check that I fully understood their meanings. I was excited by what I was doing and found it rewarding to learn new aspects of Yup’ik culture and history.

In listening to elders’ words, I have been impressed by the passion they feel about young people learning to appreciate the traditional values so that they can lead better lives and contribute to the health of their communities. Elders see how much has been lost as a result of cultural and material change and the shift away from Yup’ik ways of learning, being and speaking. Alcoholism, loss of respect for others, broken families and hopelessness come from losing that vital connection to cultural knowledge and identity.

Ceremony and Celebration

Our traditional spiritual life was based on the recognition that all things have ella, awareness. Elders were taught that if you are out walking and see a piece of driftwood sticking out of the mud, you should pull it out and turn it over so that the muddy part can dry. That piece of wood is alive and aware, and it will feel gratitude for your kindness.

Elders have told us about the masked dance ceremonies of the past. The winter celebrations honored the yuit, or inner persons, of the animals, and the dances were a kind of prayer that asked for these spirits to give their physical bodies to meet the needs of the community. Shamans made carvings or masks representing animals – walrus, caribou, seals and others. When the masks were danced in the qasgiq (community house), it was a petition for those animals to return in the spring. During Nakaciuryaraq, the Bladder Festival, the bladders of seals that had been taken by hunters during the year were returned to the sea through a hole in the ice, allowing those seals to be reborn in new bodies.

Kevgiq, the Messenger Feast, was a spring festival for sharing and bringing communities together. People worked hard throughout the year, gathering plants, hunting furs and harvesting food, and Kevgiq was a time to distribute some of what they had earned to others. Parents were especially proud if one of their children had contributed to the family’s effort for the first time – a son who brought home his first game or a daughter who caught a pike through the ice. Those events were recognized as rites of passage that meant the child was beginning a lifetime of providing for kin and community. By giving away at Kevgiq, a family ensured the future success of its children and the prosperity of the whole group. Villages still carry out the Messenger Feast tradition of inviting guests from other places and distributing presents to them. The dancing and gift-giving represent the same values as in the past, even if some of the items are store-bought goods. It is about giving generously to others and celebrating the success of the subsistence harvest.

Tags: Yup'ik, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

World War I

This collection highlights artifacts and secondary sources to help students explore the history of World War I. Specific topics referenced in this collection include trench warfare, women's contributions to the war effort and aid efforts.

Time Period: July 28, 1914 - November 11, 1918

National Museum of American History
31
169-192 of 1,997 Collections