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Found 799 Collections

 

Telling the Tale of the “Other”: The Effect of Artist Identity on Storytelling

This set of activities is designed to encourage students to think critically about how an artist’s race, background, and experiences might impact their ability to fairly and accurately tell the story of a different person or group - an "other." 

Specifically, students will look at the creations of two white men - the painting Wi-jún-jon, Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going To and Returning From Washington by George Catlin and the novella The Pearl by John Steinbeck - to analyze how the whiteness of these two artists might have affected their ability to fairly portray the indigenous people they sought to memorialize. Using primary source texts written by the artists themselves, students will conduct an inquiry into the possible motives and biases of these men in order to assess whether they, as white outsiders to the groups on which they focused, did or even could tell their stories accurately. The question students will be tasked with answering in writing as a culminating exercise is whether a white man can fairly and accurately tell the story of an indigenous people? 

In terms of purpose, the study of the painting is intended to supplant a traditional anticipation guide to help students prepare to read The Pearl and also to provide a lens through which to analyze the text.

#SAAMteach

Sarah Parham-Giannitti
15
 

Telling Myth with art

An in-class activity for a college level Intro to Mythology course that has students consider how mythology is not only passed on through oral or written word, but also through art.  #MCteach

Megan Howard
7
 

Tell Me a Story: The Human Imperative for Narrative

In this collection, I am exploring the connections between storytelling and art.  I will also look at the connection of storytelling to neuroscience and the effects of storytelling on the human brain. I will be referencing the work of Will Storr (The Science of Storytelling), neuroscientists, psychologists and resources from institutions such as the Smithsonian, The National Gallery of Art, The British Museum, National Geographic, and the J. Paul Getty Museum.  I will look at how artists use content, meaning, and context to create narrative within their particular medium.

Research suggest that language developed as a way to convey "social information", gossip. Furthermore, it is documented that curiosity kicks the dopamine reward signal in the human brain.  Will Storr in his 2019 book, gorgeously researched and perfectly titled The Science of Storytelling tells us that psychologist Jonathon Haidt says the brain is a 'story processor' not a 'logic processor'.  All of this tells us that humans are hardwired to tell and receive stories.  

How do artists tell stories?  Both Storr and Kidd tell us that psychologist Dr. George Lowenstein asserts there are four ways to induce curiosity in the human brain: questions or puzzles; a sequence of events without revelation of the "end"; "violation of expectations that triggers a search for an explanation"; or knowing that someone else knows something and you want to know it too.  One could almost use these as headings to categorize art and and artistic movements.  Artist capture a moment in time that prods human curiosity, in some cases for thousands of years, to create the rest of the story of that suspended juncture.

The audience for this collection might be students of psychology or English.  It could be of interest to creators of story including novelists, playwrights, actors, screenwriters, musicians, and visual artists.  And anyone interested in what Storr termed as "the science of the human condition".

Will Storr writes, "One benefit of understanding the science of storytelling is that it illuminates the 'whys' behind the 'rules' we're commonly given...Knowing why the rules are the rules means we know how to break them..."

Sources:

Dunbar, Robin et al. Evolutionary Psychology. One World Publications, 2005.

Kidd, Celeste, and Benjamin Y Hayden. “The Psychology and Neuroscience of Curiosity.” Neuron vol. 88,3 (2015): 449-60. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2015.09.010

Storr, Will. The Science of Storytelling. London: William Collins, 2019.


#AHMCFall2019

krambow
33
 

Technology: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Teaching with the Smithsonian Learning Lab: A Workshop for George Washington University Faculty and Graduate Students

For the workshop, Teaching with the Smithsonian’s Learning Lab – Millions of Resources at Your Fingertips! (January 8, 2020), this is a collection of digital museum resources and instructional strategies.  It includes a warm-up activity, a close-looking exercise, and supporting materials for participants to create their own teaching collections. 

This collection was co-created with Tess Porter

#GWTeach

Philippa Rappoport
45
 

Teaching with Haitian Art and Heritage with Frost Collection

Understanding Haitian Culture though Art

This lesson will support teaching Haitian traditions and culture through the Frost Art Museum collections. It will also provide a look into cultural identity, Haitianite supported by research conducted by two FIU faculty members .  The PowerPoint will expand on Haitian history and the notes will add talking points. The  Miami Dade County Public School lessons support various investigations from the past to the present.

Connections to the Polish Black Virgin demonstrate the spread of culture and religious beliefs that traveled as countries were conquered.

Mirmac16
24
 

Teaching The Great Gatsby with Informational Texts

#SAAMteach

This collection complements teaching The Great Gatsby using the lens of economics. Informational texts provide foundation for questions like: why should we care about economic inequality?



Cristi Marchetti
28
 

Teaching Literary Devices through Art

A good visual can often be the key to understanding (and remembering) a seemingly abstract concept. This collection demonstrates how artworks in the Smithsonian American Art Museum may be used to teach common literary devices in the English/language arts classroom such as metaphor, irony, symbolism, and more.

Key words: allegory, allusion, anthropomorphism, foreshadowing, irony, juxtaposition, metaphor, mood, motif, satire, suspense, symbol

Phoebe Hillemann
29
 

Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement

This collection brings together photographs, objects, films, articles and more - pinpoint milestones in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Section topics include: Brown vs. Board; Freedom Rides; the Selma to Montgomery March; and additional figures and events in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Each section is introduced with a standalone text tile that summarizes the resources held within the section.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.


Carolyn Hilyard
22
 

Symbols

darkness

Rachael Lim
8
 

Symbols

Christina Ratatori
9
 

Symbolism and Self-Portraiture Like Kehinde Wiley

After using the "Seven Ways to Look at a Portrait" strategy, students create self-portraits in the style of Kehinde Wiley that incorporates study symbolism, self-identity narrative, and reflection on the poses of traditional American portraiture. This lesson requires access to computer technology, a camera (mobile phone is fine), a green screen background, a green screen phone app or program, and ideally a printer.

Amy Leserman
16
 

Surrender at Appomattox

This is a lesson designed around the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox Court House, in which General Lee Surrendered to General Grant," and is intended to be used when teaching about General Lee's surrender. #npgteach
Jamie Grace
7
 

Subject: Hotels and Motels

#nmahphc

This is a sampling of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to hotels and motels, and other established places one might stay while away from home. 

These images are snapshots, real photo postcards,albumen and Kromscope stereoviews, fine art and documentary photographs, scans from glass plate negatives.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: hotels, motels, inns, spas, resorts, road trip, vacation, haciendas, roadside lodging

NMAH Photographic History Collection
44
 

Subject: Eateries

#nmahphc

This is a sampling of photographs related to dining out from the Photographic History Collection.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: restaurant, cafe, bar, dining room, diner, waiter, waitress, serving staff, hostess, ice cream shop, burger joint, pizza joint, pizzeria, food court, cafeteria, food hall, drive-through, fast food, coffee shop, saloon, canteen, chop house, grill, lunch room, watering hole, inn, dive, drive in, donut house, greasy spoon, hamburger stand, luncheonette, night club, soda fountain, deli, bistro, automat, tea house

NMAH Photographic History Collection
36
 

Student Poetry Presentation- Sylvia Plath

Students in an introduction to literature course used the Learning Lab as a platform to give presentations.

#MCteach

Jamie Gillan
14
 

Student Podcasting: Exploring the "Nature of Science" through Podcast Development [TEACHER TEMPLATE-- MAKE A COPY]

[DESCRIBE YOUR STUDENTS' PODCAST TOPIC HERE; INCLUDE ANY IMAGES, NOTES OR DOCUMENTATION ABOUT THEIR PROCESS. 

EXAMPLE (3-4 sentences): Sixth grade students conducted research about our community's access to clean drinking water, electricity, and roads over the past fifty years. Students identified subject matter experts, refined interview questions, conducted interviews and produced the episode included here. This collection includes the completed podcast episode, alongside text and images documenting the students' research and production process.]


This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection includes examples of student-created podcast epsidoes, in response to prompts from the Sidedoor for Educators collections. After listening to Sidedoor podcasts to set context, gain background knowledge from Smithsonian experts, and initiate a local dialogue on the topic, students engaged in community-based scientific research to explore and collect evidence about how this topic and the content within the episode is defined locally.

To find additional student podcast collections, search the Smithsonian Learning Lab for #YAGSidedoor2019.

Ashley Naranjo
4
 

Student Activity: Music as an Environmental Advocacy Approach

In this student activity, explore five musical artists and their connections to environmental advocacy as shared by a Smithsonian Folkways archivist. Inspired by these songs about water issues, you will write lyrics for a song on an environmental theme, incorporating relevant words and imagery.

#SmithsonianMusic

Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Student Activity: Looking at the Holocaust through Art

This student activity explores the Holocaust through art - three sculptures and one photograph of an artwork, with additional references to give historical context . Using two of Harvard's Project Zero Thinking Routines, students take a deeper dive into the material through guided looking and by considering the significance of the Holocaust personally, to the country and to the world.

Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Student Activity: An Exploration of Immigration/Migration Experiences

With this collection, students can explore people's stories of moving to a new country or culture (both forced and voluntarily), and then walk, fly, or sail "a mile in their shoes" to imagine some of the challenges they encountered in moving to their new home.

Then, they can write up their own family stories, using a variety of resources including a "Today I Am Here" homemade book, or PBS Learning Media's resources, "Digging at the Roots of Your Family Tree."

#EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 1: Precious Knowledge - Exploring notions of identity and community, Personal history / identit / membership / agency, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

Strange and Curious Smithsonian Jobs I

This collection features articles and images on two Smithsonian experts, Carla Dove and Chris Crowe, who will be speaking at the Smithsonian Associates' Ripley Center on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. For more information and to buy tickets online, go to: http://bit.ly/2AMP8Ae.


Carla Dove is a forensic ornithologist at the Natural History Museum who focuses on snarge, which is the remains of dead birds. She will be speaking about her unusual job, and describing some of her more uncommon discoveries and the difficulties in identifying them.


While working as a bird keeper at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Chris Crowe met Walnut, an aggressive white-naped female crane who responded violently to potential mates. Walnut took an instant liking to Crowe, and the two have been great friends ever since.

Ryan Camire
10
 

Strange and Curious Smithsonian Jobs I

This collection features articles and images on two Smithsonian experts, Carla Dove and Chris Crowe, who will be speaking at the Smithsonian Associates' Ripley Center on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. For more information and to buy tickets online, go to: http://bit.ly/2AMP8Ae.


Carla Dove is a forensic ornithologist at the Natural History Museum who focuses on snarge, which is the remains of dead birds. She will be speaking about her unusual job, and describing some of her more uncommon discoveries and the difficulties in identifying them.


While working as a bird keeper at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Chris Crowe met Walnut, an aggressive white-naped female crane who responded violently to potential mates. Walnut took an instant liking to Crowe, and the two have been great friends ever since.

Katie Lee
10
 

Storytelling Training: What Makes a Great Story?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this course, you'll  learn about the parts that make stories compelling, especially non-fiction narratives which are unique stories grounded in real-life perspectives and history. Explore how your story can be both personal and research-based at the same time. Even documentaries start with a script!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

SITES Museum on Main Street
22
 

Storytelling Training: What Makes a Great Story?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this course, you'll  learn about the parts that make stories compelling, especially non-fiction narratives which are unique stories grounded in real-life perspectives and history. Explore how your story can be both personal and research-based at the same time. Even documentaries start with a script!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

Heather Sanders
22
169-192 of 799 Collections