Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(501)
(1,525)
(1,781)
(1,584)
(1,958)
(34)
(828)
(682)
(362)
(1,064)
(368)
(409)

Found 2,026 Collections

 

National History Day: Brown v. Board

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

Resources in this collection - articles, website, portraits, objects, and more - focus on Brown v. Board of Education, a landmark Supreme Court case that declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: integration; thurgood marshall; little rock nine; topeka; kansas; racism; NAACP; national national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
18
 

National History Day: NAACP & "Birth of a Nation"

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

Resources in this collection - portraits, artifacts, photographs, and an article - supplement the EDSITEment lesson plan, Birth of a Nation, the NAACP, and the Balancing of Rights, which discusses the connection between the rise of the NAACP and their protests of the 1915 propaganda film Birth of a Nation. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: kkk; national association for the advancement of colored people; moorfield storey; w. e. b. du bois; racism; national national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
24
 

National History Day: Freedom Rides

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

Resources in this collection - portraits, artifacts, photographs, and an article - are compiled to supplement the American Experience Film, Freedom Riders. The Freedom Riders were civil rights activists who, in 1961, rode interstate buses to the segregated Southern U.S. to challenge the non-enforcement of Supreme Court decisions that ruled segregated buses unconstitutional. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: sncc; student nonviolent coordinating committee; congress of racial equality; freedom ride; national national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
19
 

6 Jewish American objects for Jewish American Heritage Month

This is a collection of six objects, from the National Museum of American History, that were selected by museum staff for what they reveal about the Jewish American experience.

I've created this collection from the blog post by Tory Alrman. Tory Altman has also blogged about patriotic songs beyond the national anthem and what it means to be American.

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

National History Day: "Flygirls"

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - photographs, objects, videos, articles, and more - focus on the lives and contributions of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs), or "Flygirls" of WWII. Highlighted in this collection are also two African-American aviators, Willa Brown and Janet Bragg; discriminatory practices disallowed African-Americans from joining the WASPs during WWII. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: Women's Rights. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: woman; women; female; feminism; feminist; pilot; aviator; army; world war 2; ww2; world war II; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
29
 

National History Day: Suffrage Movement, 1848-1919

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

This collection focuses on milestones and important figures in the American Suffrage Movement, beginning at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 and leading up to the passing of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1919. Resources include lesson plans, photographs, videos, objects, articles, and more. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: Women's Rights. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tiles for summaries of section resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: women's rights; woman; female; feminism; feminist; suffrage; suffragette; protest; reform; civil rights; equal rights; susan b anthony; elizabeth cady stanton; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
51
 

Captured by Indians: Warfare and Assimilation on the 18thC Frontier.

After the Britains won the British, French and Indian War, the victors made promises to the native Americans that the former French claims would not be occupied by the English colonists. The Quebec Act forbade settlers to pass beyond the ridge of the Appalachian Mountains. Britain soon discovered that it was impossible to stop the settlers from crossing into Indian lands. The reaction of the native-Americans was swift and furious. Raiding parties killed and/or captured hundreds of these frontier farmers.

Arthur Glaser
34
 

National History Day: American Revolution and the Founders

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - including artifacts, portraits, videos, and websites - highlight six of the "Founding Fathers": Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin. Other important figures vital to the American Revolution, such as Patrick Henry and Thomas Paine, are also included. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: revolutionary war; war of independence; bill of rights; early america; dissent; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
58
 

National History Day: Women's Rights

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - portraits, objects, blog posts, websites, articles, and more - pinpoint milestones in the Women's Rights Movement in the United States. Because of the depth of resources on this topic, this collection has been split into sections: Suffrage Movement, 1848-1919; World War II "Flygirls"; Eleanor Roosevelt; and other leaders in the fight for Women's Rights. Each section is introduced with a standalone text tile that summarizes the resources held within the section. The first two section summaries are followed by a link out to a sub-collection of resources, containing additional Smithsonian resources on these topics.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: suffragists; suffragette; pilot; female; woman; feminist; feminism; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
51
 

Engineering Flight

This is a master collection designed to be copied and adapted to your individual classroom needs. Included are three scalable student activities that teach students engineering skills using methods similar to those that made the Wright brothers pioneers of aviation. Feel free to pick and choose from the activities in creating your own collections:

1. The Four Forces of Flight

In this student activity, students will briefly go over the four forces of flight (lift, drag, weight, and thrust) and put them to the test in the Paper Airplane Challenge! This activity is suitable for Primary/Intermediate grade levels.

2. Engineering the Wright Way

The second student activity is an online interactive, "Engineering the Wright Way"*, where students will develop engineering skills to design and test all the different components of an airplane based on the the Wrights' methodology. Students can write down a save code generated in the interactive to store their progress and return to finish the activity later. This activity is suitable for Intermediate/Middle grade levels.

3. Take a Wright Flight

The third student activity is an online flight simulator to learn three controls of flight: yaw, pitch, and roll. The final segment is an online interactive** to test fly the original Wright Flyer in conditions similar to that cold December morning when the Wrights first achieved flight, using direct 3D scans of the original Wright Flyer made by the Smithsonian. This activity is suitable for all grades.


*The "Engineering the Wright Way" lesson plan and activity were created by the National Air and Space Museum, courtesy of the Alcoa Foundation.

**The Wright Brothers Flyer activity was created by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
19
 

Yup'ik Parka: Object Analysis

This introductory student activity explores the Yup'ik gut parka, a type of garment created from the intestines of sea mammals to protect sea hunters from wind, rain, and stormy seas. The Yup'ik, native to Alaska and coastal Canada, used these not only for hunting but also spiritual occasions, such as religious ceremonies. Collection includes: two parkas, one for hunting and one for ceremonies; a map of the geographic boundaries of the Yup'ik before the arrival of Euro-American settlers; and a video of modern Yup'ik discussing the traditional process of creating these garments and the importance of conserving and continuing this tradition today.

Collection can be used as an introductory activity to an investigation of: Yup'ik culture, Yup'ik relationships to their environment, Arctic cultures, Native American innovations, or the importance of continuing traditions.

Keywords: american indian, sea mammals, gutskin, conservation, yupik

Tess Porter
5
 

National History Day: African American Civil Rights Movement

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - photographs, objects, films, lesson plans, articles and more - pinpoint milestones in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Section topics include: NAACP & Birth of a Nation; the Scottsboro Boys; Brown vs. Board; Freedom Rides; the Selma to Montgomery March; and additional figures and events in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Each section is introduced with a standalone text tile that summarizes the resources held within the section. The first, third, and fourth section summaries are followed by a link out to a sub-collection of resources containing additional Smithsonian resources on these topics.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: segregation; racism; national association for the advancement of colored people; equality; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
73
 

National History Day: Abolitionists

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - including portraits, articles, primary source documents, videos, and websites - highlight four abolitionists profiled in American Experience film The Abolitionists and the National Youth Summit on Abolition: William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Brown. Additional resources related to abolitionism and other important abolitionists are located at the end. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tiles for summaries of section resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: civil war; slavery; underground railroad; african-american; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
76
 

Voting in America: The Early Years

The evolution of the voting ballot.
Candice Troutman
5
 

Letters from the Japanese American Internment

The lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom are based on letters from young people in an Arizona internment camp to a children's librarian in their hometown of San Diego. Students piece together a story by comparing the primary-source documents. The exercise might help to show that history is never a single story.

Click on the PDF icon to download. Please also see lesson plans on the site "A More Perfect Union" from the National Museum of American History.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
3
 

Equality, Inclusion, Democracy: What Do They Look Like to You?

Activity to spur a Montgomery College-wide conversation about these topics.

#MCteach

Sara Ducey
90
 

The Art of West Virginia

Art and photography of the Mountain State
Pamela Curtin
45
 

A Golden Destiny: Manifest Destiny and Westward Expansion

This collection explores Leutze's Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way in connection to westward expansion, Lundeberg's Pioneers of the West, and Whitman's poem "Pioneers! O Pioneers!".

#SAAMteach
Lauren Chavey
5
 

Sputnik: Scientific Advances, Public Perception, and Political Priorities in the Cold War

The Soviet launch of Sputnik did much more than simply send a satellite into space. The announcement that the USSR had successfully launched a satellite that orbited the Earth was used to dramatize Soviet scientific superiority and set into motion a series of actions and statements by U.S. politicians designed to manage the public's fears and prevent the United States from falling behind.

Guiding questions:
-When it comes to military strength, which is more important: reality or perception?
-How do the sciences impact national defense?
-Why was a space program considered important and necessary for both the Soviet Union and the United States?
-How and why do foreign events impact domestic politics and culture?

Tags: Wilson Center, Cold War, Space Race, Sputnik, Technology, Soviet Union, USSR, Communism
Kate Harris
21
 

Art and Technology Projects for Museums and Classrooms: From "Today I Am Here" to "Discovering US/Descubriéndonos"

This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, ESOL, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate their own "Today I Am Here" project, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

"Today I Am Here" is a project in which students make a handmade book from one piece of paper, that tells the story of how they got to where they are today. This project is wonderful in a classroom to show the breadth and diversity of the class, and to encourage cross-cultural understanding. 

Inside you will find instructions and images for the various components of the project, as well as samples of student work. 

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Bloody Sunday: Selma and A March for Freedom

Sunday morning, March 7, 1965, several hundred protesters gathered in Selma Alabama planning to march to Montgomery in the hopes of obtaining federal protection for a voting rights statute. As the group, led by John Lewis and members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, approached the Edmund Pettus Bridge they were blocked by Alabama State Troopers and local police. The confrontation turned violent after law enforcement ordered the protesters to turn around and when they didn't comply they were assaulted with tear gas and beaten with billy clubs resulting in more than 50 people being hospitalized.

Key terms:
Civil Rights
Civil Rights Movement

Maureen Minard
20
 

Did the Industrial Revolution Make Life Better for Everyone?

A collection focused on teaching the Industrial Revolution. The artifacts found in this collection are intended to be used as part of an Inquiry Design Model (IDM). Within the IDM, images could not only be used within staging the question, but also to help students build contextual knowledge under the supporting questions of (1) what changes were made in manufacturing, (2) how did society benefit from industrialization, and (3) what were the challenges society faced during industrialization? #C3Framework #TeachingInquiry
Jennifer Fraker
17
 

The Face of Feminism

Who gets to be the face of a movement?

Created for the National Portrait Gallery Learning to Look Summer Institute, 2016 #NPGteach #BecauseOfHerStory

Rachel Slezak
4
 

Migration at the U.S.-Mexico Border

This activity helps students consider the human experience of migration by analyzing a portrait using "jumping in" strategies to describe the sensory experience; answering a series of guided questions to interpret the portrait before and after reading the informational text about the artist and portrait; and finally, reading relevant articles about migration at the US-Mexican border and using academic vocabulary to describe the push and pull factors at play and other characteristics of this example of migration.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery’s 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.
TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery

The collection was originally intended for use in Human Geography, specifically the unit on Population Demographics and Migration.

As this collection description is directed toward teachers, the collection itself is written and structured for student use and could be completed independently, in a group classroom setting and/or online.
Kristin Kowalew
4
1753-1776 of 2,026 Collections