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Found 3,325 Resources

Ascending incline, angle 1 in 4

National Museum of American History

Angling in Great Britain / by William Senior

Smithsonian Libraries
At head of title: International fisheries exhibition, London, 1883

"Handbooks issued in connection with the great International Fisheries Exhibition"--Cover.

"Issued by authority"--Cover.

Also available online.

Elecresource

Design for Hat Tree "C" with Angled Branches

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Ascending incline, angle 1 in 4

National Museum of American History

Camera, Television, Apollo 7, with Wide Angle Lens

National Air and Space Museum
This RCA camera and attached 100mm wide-angle lens were part of the first television broadcast from space. This took place during the Apollo 7 mission when astronauts Wally Schirra, Walter Cunningham, and Donn Eisle orbited the Earth hundreds of times over their ten day mission. The black and white camera had three lenses, including a wide angle lens, which was used most frequently. This type of lens and camera were used extensively for orbital and lunar television transmissions during the Apollo program.

NASA transferred this camera and lens to the Museum in 1972.

Wide Angle Lens, Camera, Television, Apollo 7

National Air and Space Museum
This RCA camera and attached 100mm wide-angle lens were part of the first television broadcast from space. This took place during the Apollo 7 mission when astronauts Wally Schirra, Walter Cunningham, and Donn Eisle orbited the Earth hundreds of times over their ten day mission. The black and white camera had three lenses, including a wide angle lens, which was used most frequently. This type of lens and camera were used extensively for orbital and lunar television transmissions during the Apollo program.

NASA transferred this camera and lens to the Museum in 1972.

Extra Wide Angle Lens, Camera, Television, Apollo 7

National Air and Space Museum
This RCA camera and attached 100mm wide-angle lens were part of the first television broadcast from space. This took place during the Apollo 7 mission when astronauts Wally Schirra, Walter Cunningham, and Donn Eisle orbited the Earth hundreds of times over their ten day mission. The black and white camera had three lenses, including a wide angle lens, which was used most frequently. This type of lens and camera were used extensively for orbital and lunar television transmissions during the Apollo program.

NASA transferred this camera and lens to the Museum in 1972.

Lens, Wide Angle, Television Camera, Apollo

National Air and Space Museum
This wide angle lens is of the same type as the one used on the Westinghouse black and white television camera. It is similar to the one used to transmit images of astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on Apollo 11. Stored in the Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) of the "Eagle" lunar module (LM), the camera was deployed by Armstrong before he climbed down the ladder of the LM and transmitted the historic "first step" back to Earth. After the astronauts were on the lunar surface, they placed the camera away from the LM to record their activities. The original camera is still on the Moon.

NASA transferred this camera to the Museum in 1972.

Lens, Wide Angle, Television Camera, Apollo

National Air and Space Museum
Wide angle lenses like this one were used during the first live television broadcasts from space made from a black-and-white RCA television camera. The first three Apollo missions used these RCA cameras and Fairchild lenses. Apollo 10 and the lunar landing missions used color cameras.

Some astronauts objected to adding photography to their busy schedules, but their broadcasts drew millions of viewers and exposed the world to life in space, live on their home TVs. The cameras had lenses for different applications, including a telephoto lens to capture images of Earth from space.

NASA transferred this lens to the Museum in 1973.

Cap, Lens, Wide Angle, Television Camera, Apollo

National Air and Space Museum
This lens cap comes from a wide angle lens used during the first live television broadcasts from space made from a black-and-white RCA television camera. The first three Apollo missions used these RCA cameras and Fairchild lenses. Apollo 10 and the lunar landing missions used color cameras.

Some astronauts objected to adding photography to their busy schedules, but their broadcasts drew millions of viewers and exposed the world to life in space, live on their home TVs. The cameras had lenses for different applications, including a telephoto lens to capture images of Earth from space.

NASA transferred this lens cap with the camera lens to the Museum in 1973.

Lens, Wide Angle, Television Camera, Apollo

National Air and Space Museum
Wide angle lenses like this one were used during the first live television broadcasts from space made from a black-and-white RCA television camera. The first three Apollo missions used these RCA cameras and Fairchild lenses. Apollo 10 and the lunar landing missions used color cameras.

Some astronauts objected to adding photography to their busy schedules, but their broadcasts drew millions of viewers and exposed the world to life in space, live on their home TVs. The cameras had lenses for different applications, including a telephoto lens to capture images of Earth from space.

NASA transferred this lens to the Museum in 1973.

Computer, Star Chart, Hour Angle, Felsenthal

National Air and Space Museum
White plastic with black and red markings.

Case, Drift Angle Meter, Navy, Pioneer (later model?)

National Air and Space Museum
31-1/2 in. l fully extended; has 2 alt. scales 500-2000 & 2000-5000f

Computer, Local Hour Angle, Navigation, Felsenthal

National Air and Space Museum
White and yellow plastic with black markings.

Construction No. 2 (Equi-Angle No. 1)

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Bombsight, Japanese, Type 10 Bombsight for Dive Angle

National Air and Space Museum
This is a rectangular sealed container with no optics, indicating that this is only a component to a complete unit. It appears to be a controlling device with input from the external pulley for cable control with cam and results transmitted to the drive shaft protrusion.

Grey box, electrical connector on one side, pully and cam mechanism on the opposite side. Data plate on top in Japanese.

Carver, Interproximal, Off Angle, #5 Handle

National Museum of American History

Angle's Regulating and Retaining Appliance, Set No. 1

National Museum of American History

Use The Right Angle Specify Standard Parts

National Air and Space Museum
Relief Halftone/Screen print: Orange, black and white illustrated print advertising Standard Parts. Graphic of a black, metal L-bracket on an orange and white background.

Drift Angle Meter, Navy, Pioneer (later model?)

National Air and Space Museum
31-1/2in.l fully extended;has 2 alt. scales 500-2000&2000-5000f

Computer, Drift Angle, Navy, Felsenthal, 1-CH-1

National Air and Space Museum
White plastic with black markings.
145-168 of 3,325 Resources