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Found 5,235 Collections

 

Photographs of the Great Depression: Unveiling Stories

This activity analyzes the stories told by photographs of the Resettlement Administration (RA) and Farm Security Administration (FSA) programs, which ran from 1935 to 1937 and 1937 to 1942 respectively. These photographs were taken to document the conditions and hardships experienced by Americans across the country during the Great Depression, as well as the success of relief services implemented by these two programs. Published widely in newspapers, magazines, books, and exhibitions, these photographs helped shape the public's perception and memory of this difficult time period.

Using two Project Zero Global Thinking Routines - "Unveiling Stories" and "The 3 Ys" - students will uncover the stories and perspectives portrayed by these photographs in multiple contexts, from the personal to the global. Additional resources (photographer interviews and an article) and information on how to use these routines in the classroom can by found by clicking Read More ».

RA & FSA photographers included in this collection: Carl Mydans, Dorothea Lange, Arthur Rothstein, and Marion Post Wolcott.

Keywords: poverty, rural, urban, roy stryker, new deal, inquiry strategy, global competence, global competency, 1930s, 30s, dust bowl, photojournalism

#historicalthinking

Tess Porter
20
 

Defining Moments

There are defining moments that forever change who we are in history.  This collection shares a few  events  that significantly impacted the nation and beyond.  

Nancy Butler
21
 

Virginia History Told Through Stamps

Significant persons and events from Virginia History are told through U.S. Stamps.  Discover the history of the Old Dominion.

Nancy Butler
24
 

Faces of the Civil Rights movement

Images and symbols of the individuals who pioneered the art of organization in the face of injustice. This collection depicts those who engaged in the struggle for racial equality throughout the Civil Rights movement and the 20th Century 


Danny Rivas
20
 

Moon

This collection is about the moon, a little brother of the earth, reflecting the light from the sun and lighting up the night.

Mark Wang
4
 

Sustainable by Design

Students identify needs in their community and design a building to fit that need using Agency by Design framework and protocols. Designed for a collaborative unit with Environmental Science and Sculpture High School students.

Ashley Beck
32
 

Cotton Boll Lesson

A set of resources to implement the cotton boll activity presented in the Smithsonian's Let's Do History Tour along with related Alabama primary sources.

fifthgradeteacher
20
 

1905

how's world in 1905 looks like
jackie li
12
 

impressionism

impressionism paintings

jackie li
8
 

War of 1812/Creek Wars

fifthgradeteacher
3
 

Black Panther Movie Collection

The Visual arts can be  an entry point to literacy in the classroom.   Use these objects in the collection of the National Museum of African Art to aid  students to explore authentic African art works that inspired the Academy Award winning costume design of Ruth Carter in the blockbuster movie Black Panther.    Students can develop visual vocabulary through close looking to describe mood, tone, atmosphere, and inference and explore cross-curricular and cross cultural connections.  It allows them to really be creative and  critical thinkers! 

Alice Bonilha
99
 

Transitional Justice around the World

Images and symbols of countries that can be considered subjects for the study of transitional justice. Transitional justice relates to justice methods used to approach societies scarred by major human rights violations.

Danny Rivas
6
 

Virginia History Tour

From Jamestown to the present, explore some of the people, places and events that tell the story of the history of Virginia. 

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Nancy Butler
56
 

Paths to Perspective: How the Past Connects to Our Present

This lesson is inspired by Out of Eden Learn, the journey of Paul Salopek, and the idea that each person is an amalgamation of the people and events that came before them. These people and events include the nature of their birth, the lives of their parents, the experiences of their grandparents, the creation of the printing press, etc. The idea behind this lesson is, in its inception, to expose students to milestones in black history, and to use that rich history to challenge them to look into their past to see how they connect to larger events that came before them last week or even a century or millennia ago.

This lesson is especially crafted for Black History Month (though of course it can be used at other times) to have students from multiple ethnic backgrounds try to find a connection to the African American Experience in the United States. It removes students from an ethnic vacuum and asks them to see how the journey of others not like them has an impact on their, their family's and their country's history.

To begin your use of this collection please read the lesson plan at the beginning labeled Lesson Plan: Paths To Perspective. It is the full lesson for using this Learning Lab collection. You may use it in full or alter as you see fit for the needs of your class. It is by no means exhaustive, especially in terms of Project Zero ideas that can be used with the collection, but it is a good starting point for how to use this material in class.

#GoGlobal

Sean Felix
23
 

Basque Music and Dance

Explore the sounds and movements of the Basque Culture.
BasqueMuseumBoise
4
 

Basque Sports

From pala to Bola-Jokoa, have a look at these unique Basque Sports!
BasqueMuseumBoise
3
 

Exploring Food in Basque Culture

Get hungry while you explore the unique and delicious traditions of the Basque people through food. 

BasqueMuseumBoise
3
 

Library of Congress artworks

I have given numerous presentations on countless artworks in the Library of Congress's Thomas Jefferson Building.  These images show some of the artworks I have discussed. 

Lynda Cooper
40
 

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos shares the compelling story of legendary activist and leader Dolores Huerta (b. 1930) and the farm workers movement of the 1960s and 70s. It is a quintessentially American tale of struggle and sacrifice, of courage and victory.

As a complement to the exhibition, these educational resources explore Huerta's public life as an activist and co-founder of the United Farm Workers  (UFW) and what led her to become a Latina civil rights icon. In her life as a communicator, organizer, lobbyist, contract negotiator, teacher and mother,  Huerta's unparalleled leadership skills helped dramatically improve the lives of farm workers.

Users will broaden their understanding of the farm workers movement through a careful look at Dolores Huerta's significant - but often under-acknowledged - contributions. The exhibition and educational resources also explore how workers of different ethnic and racial backgrounds came together to empower the movement and how the arts played an essential role. In addition, users will come to understand Huerta's far-reaching impact and important legacy.


Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
39
 

Acting to Overcome Systems of Oppression

This collection is designed to extend students' thinking about acting to overcome systems of oppression after they read a memoir that focuses on social justice and activism. In our English program, students in 6th grade read I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World by Malala Yousazai; in 7th grade, students read March: Book One by John Lewis; and in 8th grade, students read Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi. All use the Project Zero thinking routine "Think, Feel, Care" to explore Malala's, John Lewis's, or Marjane's reaction to the system of oppression they face in their story. To engage with the thinking routine, we ask the following questions:

Think: How does the character understand the system and her/his role within it?

Feel: What is the character's emotional response to this system and her/his position within it?

Care: What are her/his values, priorities, and motivations with regard to this system? What is important to her/him?

From there, students analyze the question: How does the character act on what is important to her/him in response to this system?

We use this collection and the "Think, Feel, Care" routine to look at how others have responded to and acted against different systems of oppression. After spending time with this collection, we end with the "Circle of Action" thinking routine to help us think about the potential for our own action against systems of oppression.

This collection could be used in conjunction with any unit that focuses on social justice or activism. 

#GoGlobal

Marissa McCauley
14
 

8th Grade Spanish Literacy: Mi Comunidad

This collection is for an 8th grade Spanish Literacy unit on community, but it can be used for any secondary ed unit on a topic related to community. The essential questions that guide student learning are: What is a community? How am I shaped by my community? There are 5 instructional activities attached to this collection that can be used to explore the concept of community and help students generate understandings in response to the essential questions. These lessons include activities related to project-based learning, oral presentation, experiential learning through field trips, viewing artworks using thinking routines, and writing poetry.  The images included in the collection serve as options that pair well with the thinking routines or any other activities that teachers might like to use to explore this topic with their students. #GoGlobal


Maria Fernanda Garcia
50
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