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Found 2,812 Resources

The Curse of the Hope Diamond

Smithsonian Institution

The Hope Diamond is one of the most iconic items in the Smithsonian's collections, but this glittering gem is rumored to have a dark side. French monarchs, an heiress, and at least one unlucky postman have met misfortune after possessing it—though does that really constitute a curse? This time on Sidedoor, we track the lore of this notorious gem through the centuries, from southern India, through the French Revolution, and across the Atlantic Ocean to its current home at the National Museum of Natural History, to find out for ourselves.

The Art of War

Smithsonian Institution

In this episode, we look at artists whose work has helped reveal the human side of war. You’ll hear about a famous artist who got his start sketching Civil War soldiers and landscapes, and how he was never the same again. Also featured are two contemporary artists: a painter whose work depicts war's psychological impact on his best friend, and a female combat photographer who repeatedly risked her own life to document her fellow soldiers’ experiences on the battlefield.

That Brunch in the Forest

Smithsonian Institution

In 1621, a group of Pilgrims and Native Americans came together for a meal that many Americans call "The First Thanksgiving." But get this—it wasn't the first, and the meal itself wasn't so special either. The event was actually all but forgotten for hundreds of years…until it was dusted off to bolster the significance of a national holiday. This time on Sidedoor, we talk to Paul Chaat Smith, a curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, to explore how much of what you think you know about Native Americans may be more fiction than fact.

Tech Yourself

Smithsonian Institution

Technology's grip on us: The 4-1-1 on what's behind your selfie; an artist's computer simulation shows humans aren't as unique as we think; and how the invention of standardized time made America tick.

Tchavikwa Vocabulary, June 22, 1971 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Also available as copy on 5 inch sound tape reel, 3 3/4 ips (71-R-17)

71-R-5 recorded at Kahilona

Tchavikwa Tribal History and Songs at Kahilona, Chitado area, June 21, 1971 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Also available as copy on 5 inch sound tape reel, 3 3/4 ips (71-R-17)

Talking About the Blues (Program #14)

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
This show is called “talking about and singing the blues.” The idea comes from the Folkways album “This is the Blues.” It features Big Bill Broonzy, Sonny Terry, and Brownie McGhee. The album was built around a radio show produced by the great Studs Turkel of Chicago’s WFMT and was recorded on May 7th, 1957. Smithsonian Folkways: Sounds to Grow On is a 26-part series hosted by Michael Asch that features the original recordings of Folkways Records.

Tairora Taidora, 1954 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives

Tairora Syd Stocken, 1954 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives

Tairora Snake Bite, 1954 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives

Tairora Bano, 1954-1955 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives

Tairora Akorie [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives

Symposium on still life painting : sound recording, 1982 May 21-22

Archives of American Art
4 sound cassettes. A symposium on still life painting sponsored by the Archives of American Art and the National Academy of Design.
Participants include: Lennart Anderson, William Bailey, Doreen B. Burke, Janet I. Fish, William H. Gerdts, Perry Townsend Rathbone, John Wilmerding, and Jane Wilson.

Susan Miller-Havens, artist interview

National Portrait Gallery
Interview with artist Susan Miller-Havens, creator of the portrait of Carlton Fisk on view at the National Portrait Gallery, in the "Champions" exhibition. Interview by NPG senior historian Sid Hart

Survivor

National Air and Space Museum

They say that extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, particularly when you’re looking for signs of extraterrestrial life. Is that a Martian bacterium you just found, or is it an Earth bug accidentally along for the ride? An Israeli spacecraft recently crashed on the Moon, unintentionally spilling a payload of adorable, microscopic extremophiles called tardigrades (aka water bears or moss piglets). Tardigrades can survive a lot of harsh environments, including the hard vacuum of space, and may now be alive on the lunar surface. In the final episode of season 2, Emily, Nick, and Matt discuss the implications of tardigrades on the Moon, and why scientists are working hard to ensure that microbes from Earth aren’t contaminating our search for life in the solar system. Water Bears on the Moon! Planetary Defense! Outer Space Law!

Stuart Davis, Self-portrait

National Portrait Gallery

Struggle and Protest (Program #24)

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Moses Asch was a steadfast and passionate advocate for underdogs who spoke up for themselves. He cared deeply about unions, civil rights, fights for freedom, and fights against oppression. On this show, his son Michael Asch explores the catalogue looking for songs that exemplify this commitment. Smithsonian Folkways: Sounds to Grow On is a 26-part series hosted by Michael Asch that features the original recordings of Folkways Records.

Stonewall Jackson portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
David Ward, historian at NPG, discusses Stonewall Jackson

Steven Weisman, author talk

National Portrait Gallery
"Daniel Patrick Moynihan: A Portrait in Letters of an American Visionary" by Steven Weisman, discussion at NPG.

Steve Pyke, artist talk

National Portrait Gallery
Photographer Steve Pyke discusses his work on display in "Portraiture Now: Feature Photography"

Stanton L. Catlin interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Stanton L. Catlin (1915-1997) was assistant director of Yale University Art Gallery and later the gallery director and professor at Syracuse University. Before the World War II, Catlin was introduced to Rose Valland, who was the assistant to the director of the Jeu de Paume Museum. During World War II, Valland spied on the Nazis who used the Jeu de Paume Museum as a storage location for looted art before transporting the artwork by train to various German repositories scattered throughout Germany and Austria. In this audio excerpt, Catlin talks about Valland's contributions to the recovery of artwork plundered by the Nazis.

Stacilee Ford, author talk

National Portrait Gallery
"Troubling American Women: Narratives of Gender and Nation in Hong Kong" -- author Stacilee Ford discusses her book.

Sports: Breaking Records, Breaking Barriers

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
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