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Found 1,793 Collections

 

Decoding Lincoln: Vocabulary Coding with the Gettysburg Address

This collection provides background knowledge for students while they analyze Abraham Lincoln's word choice in his speech the Gettysburg Address. Students will then participate in a vocabulary coding activity to build comprehension of the message in the speech.
Steps in Vocabulary Coding:
1. Start with a gateway question (a question to get students into the text in a non-threatening way that requires no prior knowledge or comprehension) Which word appears most often in The Gettysburg Address? Identify the word. Is it used in the same form or part of speech throughout the text? Present the text as a puzzle to solve.
2. Read aloud the Gettysburg address while students follow along.
3. Practice Coding: Directions: Code important words with a plus sign "+" above known words, and a minus sign"-" above unknown words.
Get with a partner and compare words, then list them in a T-chart.
4. After teams have selected words, the teacher briefly provides a 5 W’s and H background for the text using the slides in the collection: Who wrote it, What was it about, When was it written, Where was it set, Why was it written, and How was the text presented. For more rigor and if time allows, give teams of students one image from the collection to research and present as background knowledge for the class.
5. Group defines words: Partners whip around to share word choices, then chart words (tally repeated words.)
Choose at least six "minus" words to chart as a class and briefly define with synonyms or short phrases.
6. Teacher assigns one section of the text per group. Group finds and selects shortest definition for that word in the context of the text and summarizes the main idea of that section of text.
7. Teams share word definitions and summary while class annotates.
8. Finally, each team picks at least three of the important vocabulary words to write a group summary of the text in 1-2 sentences (starting with 5 W’s + H). Then each individual student writes a personal response to the text (how they feel, the historical impact, the meaning of the text today, etc.) using at least three new vocabulary words from the text. Highlight vocab words, and share writing with partner.



Kathy Powers
24
 

Slave Resistance

This collection includes items representing various forms of slave resistance and rebellion. Students should determine what kind of actions are pictured in the case of each item and use them to create a robust definition of slave resistance.

Guiding Questions:
What does it mean to "resist" slavery?
How did white slave-owners respond to such actions?
Is maintaining a distinct cultural heritage a form of resistance? Why or why not?
How do religion, art, and music encourage resistance?
Kate Harris
13
 

Artful Thinking-American History

The students will examine various paintings by incorporating different thinking techniques to explore American History through art.
Jourdan Englert
15
 

Lewis and Clark: an expedition across America

Who were Lewis and Clark? Where did they go? Why did they go? Who sent them? Who did they meet along the way? What dangers did they face? Did anyone help them?
This is a Collection of resources including images, videos, text, online exhibits, and a lesson plan that support Lewis and Clark's expedition across American in the early 1800s.
mrsjoyce
38
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 3

Set 3 of 4
Jeff Holliday
32
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 4

Set 4 of 4
Jeff Holliday
38
 

Pittsburgh at the 1893 Columbian Exposition

The first world's fair exhibited the latest advancements in technology, food production, and the arts. Pittsburgh was represented by Westinghouse, Heinz, Brashear, and Ferris.
Arthur Glaser
36
 

Liquid Gold: The Discovery of Oil in Pennsylvania

Oil existed in shallow pools and was discovered both oozing from the soil and as a contaminent in salt wells.
Arthur Glaser
19
 

1812: A Nation Emerges

The War of 1812 was a military conflict that forged America's destiny to emerge as a strong nation. The war lasted less than two years but it was celebrated as the, "second war of independence" from Great Britain.
Linda Muller
23
 

The Three Vinegar Tasters and Daoism

This collection includes a brief overview of Daoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism. It focuses on the story of Laozi and his ideas about the Dao and the balance between yin and yang. It includes two short passages from the Dao de Jing, assessment questions throughout, and a final task where students create their own collection about Daoism.

Tags: Dao, Confucius, Tao, Buddha, Laozi, China, religion, philosophy

Kate Harris
8
 

Investigating: Civil War Portraits

In this student activity, students will investigate nine portraits of people involved in the Civil War, both from the Union and the Confederacy. Through these portraits, students will gain an understanding of: experiences of people on both sides of the war; why these people are seen as historically significant; and how portraiture can communicate how a person wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen. Included with each portrait is a video that explains the historical significance of the person depicted.  Activity extension ideas can be found by clicking "Read More."

Big Ideas: 

  • Why are these people, and the developments they shaped, seen as historically significant? 
  • How does portraiture communicate how a person wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen?

Keywords: thomas stonewall jackson, william tecumseh sherman, john pelham, elmer e ellsworth, george armstrong custer, jefferson davis, abraham lincoln, clara barton

Tess Porter
10
 

Context for Weikers Family Collection: Life in Nazi Germany and Resettling in the United States

This collection was created to align with with the Weikers Family collection and provides general context about life in Germany for a Jewish family in the 1930s and their eventual resettlement to the United States. The artifacts in the collection are not necessarily specific to the Weikers family, but give some idea of how others might have shared similar experiences.

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources, Pittsburgh

Kate Harris
19
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.

Also included in this collection is an accompanying activity sheet on building archival narratives. This prompt is meant to guide students through the process of building the Weikers family story based on the records that they created and kept during a harrowing chapter in their history.



For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

#historicalthinking


Sierra Green
11
 

Slavery to Freedom

This collection contains a variety of resources that can be used by teachers and students to understand the origins of slavery and slavery in America.
Linda Muller
23
 

Branches of Government

This Collection contains resource to help students understand the three branches of government in the United States.
Linda Muller
12
 

Atomic City in the Appalachian Mountains

The Manhattan Project didn't begin in a lab in Los Alamos Nevada - it began in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee. President Roosevelt wanted to put an end to WWII, so in December of 1942 he authorized the Manhattan Project. Work on procuring and clearing land for the Oak Ridge Tennessee site was already underway.
By the end of WWII, Oak Ridge was the fifth largest town in Tennessee and the Clinton Engineer Works consumed 1/7th of all the power produced in the nation.
Linda Muller
19
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Zora Neale Hurston: Author, Anthropologist and Folklore Researcher

This teaching collection includes introductory resources to begin a study of Zora Neale Hurston, as an author, anthropologist and folklore researcher during the Harlem Renaissance.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Prohibition

Did the 18th Amendment effectively keep America dry during the 1920s-1930s? What about Prohibition locally in Pittsburgh - was it effective?

This collection of resources includes images, artifacts, texts, newspaper articles, and videos that are assembled to depict a macro-view of how the Prohibition Era started in America. This collection also parallels a local, micro-view examination of Prohibition here in Pittsburgh including a brief history of political corruption, bootlegging, and murder spanning a five year period from 1927 - 1932.
Linda Muller
16
 

From Silk Worms to the Silk Road

This is a collection of resources that could be used to support a lesson on the discovery of silk and the impact of the silk road(s). Artifacts include images of silkworms and the silk-making process, websites with information about the luxuries traded on the Silk Road, and video summary.

Possible guiding questions include:
-Why did silk become such an important commodity in China?
-How did the development of the silk trade routes impact both Europe and Asia?
-In what ways do artifacts from Europe and Asia reveal the cultural connections created by the Silk Road?
Kate Harris
19
 

Civil War Deaths, Pictured and Remembered

Inspired by a reading of The Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, by Drew Gilpin Faust, this is a collection that shows some of the shocking images the public saw of battlefield death, memorials to the dead, and a lesson plan on the art of memorials.
Michelle Smith
11
 

Middle Ages: Heraldry and Guild Symbols

Resources in this Collection depict images of heraldry and guild symbols from the Middle Ages.
Linda Muller
18
 

The Dred Scott Case


The Dred Scott case was one of America's most controversial Supreme Court decisions. Who was Dred Scott and did he have a right to his freedom?
The goal of this Collection is to engage students to read and research people and texts that comprised this historical event then write a persuasive essay based on opinion gathered from details and facts procured from their readings and research.

Keywords:
Dred Scott
Dred Scott vs Sanford
Dred Scott vs Sandford
U.S. Supreme Court
Supreme Court
Chief Justice Taney
Declaration of Independence
Missouri Compromise
Emancipation
Freedom
Slavery
Abolition
Pre Civil War Era
Linda Muller
9
 

American Bald Eagle

How did the bald eagle become the symbol of America? What symbolism did Native Americans find in the bald eagle?
This Collection of resources on the American bald eagle includes images, videos, sculptures, and stamps that depict the American bald eagle.
Linda Muller
17
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