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Found 1,739 Collections

 

American Revolution

Library/Social Studies Curriculum Crosswalk Resources
Erin Kizziar
5
 

American Landscape

Images of landscapes can tell you about how the artist views his or her nation in the moment. What does it value? What does it aspire to be? What are its strengths and limitations? 

Evaluate to what extent views of American Identity changed from 1800-1980.

Sarah Wiseman
8
 

American Indians

Paintings and photographs that represent the Lakota, Inuit, Kwakiutl, Pueblo, and Iroquois tribes. This aligns with Virginia SOL USI.3b. Teachers may have students look critically at each image. Students can then create a claim or hypothesis of what tribe they think it represents, along with supporting details. Teachers should use the "what makes you say that" strategy (described on the first image). This is a great check for understanding or formative assessment of student learning.

Michelle Moses
6
 

American Indian Women

This collection will present, in tangible form, the position of the American Indian woman as equals to her husband, but simply possessing a different skillset.  

Sydney Lundeberg
10
 

American Indian Movement and the Traditional Way of Life

These resources provide examples of the role of traditions in the American Indian Movement and how American Indians have attempted to keep their traditional way of life viable. #ethnicstudies

Kip Harmon
8
 

American Indian Heritage Month Resources

These classroom resources from different Smithsonian museums focus on American Indian history and culture. 


Philippa Rappoport
11
 

American Indian Culture and Rights

#ethnicstudies

Meridith Manis
9
 

American Indian and Black Civil Rights: A Shared Legacy

This is a topical collection concerning Civil Rights activism led by the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the Black Panther Party. It includes photographs, videos, and documentation from both movements. The imagery in this collection addresses the shared legacy of American Indian and Black resistance efforts in the 20th century. It also shows the continued impact of these efforts and their modern reflections, like ongoing Indigenous led efforts against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and Black Lives Matter.

This collection includes remarkable figures in both AIM and the BPP, like Russell Means (Oglala Lakota) and Angela Davis. The daily lives of those whom AIM and BPP stood up for is also addressed.

This collected was created and organized by Kenlontae' Turner, a visual artist and gallery coordinator, during his time as an intern at NMAI. Some additional context and editing was provided by Maria Ferraguto to support his work during her time time as an intern at NMAI. 

Maria Ferraguto
60
 

American Flag/Washington DC Flag Lesson, One or Two Part

With this collection, students will use a version of the Zoom In thinking routine to analyze several flags with an eye toward creating their own flag at the end of the lesson.

The Guiding Questions used in this lesson are:

-How did the United States flag change over time?

-Why do countries feel that it's important to have a single flag?

The Big Idea for this lesson is:

Simple symbols, like the those presented on flags, can represent a lot about a country's past and what makes that country unique.  

In this lesson, students will begin by exploring the collection and answering, using the quiz tool,  the questions embedded about the two early versions of the American flag.  The questions push students to analyze each flag, consider how versions of the American flag changed, and think critically about how symbolism can be used in a flag to represent unique and/or historical aspects of a country. 

Once students have completed the quiz questions, the teacher will call them together to discuss  the evolution of the American flag and what the elements of the flag's current and former designs represent.  The teacher will then turn the class's attention to the Washington DC flag and reiterate that its design was taken from George Washington's English ancestry.  Using this as another example of a flag drawing upon elements of history, the teacher will  make the point that the DC flag hasn't changed in appearance in over 80 years.  

The class will brainstorm what they feel are the most important and/or interesting aspects of DC history based on what they have studied.  They will then brainstorm symbols that could be used to abstractly represent elements of DC's unique past, status, and culture.  

Once a number of good ideas have been generated, each student will have the chance to create their own version of the DC flag, either modifying the exiting version of creating a completely new design.  On the draft sheets will be a checklist that focus's students attention on the  most important aspects of any flag, namely its symbolism and its connection to the history of the place it represents.  

If the teacher wishes to make this a longer activity featuring multiple drafts, he or she can consider looping in the art teacher to discuss concepts of sketching and design.  

#LearnwithTR



Peter Gamber
5
 

American Enterprise: Corporate Era (Great Depression, New Deal)

During the Corporate Era, the United States experienced its most serious economic crisis; in response, political leaders intervened in the economy in innovative ways. In this collection, you’ll explore life during the Great Depression and evaluate New Deal policies by participating in a learning activity the teacher specifies.
Zach Etsch
5
 

American Democracy

In conjunction with the Smithsonian Institutions Traveling Exhibition Services - American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith exhibition

More than just waging a war of independence, American revolutionaries took a great leap of faith and established a new government based on the sovereignty of the people. It was truly a radical idea that entrusted the power of the nation not in a monarchy but in its citizens. Each generation since continues to question how to form "a more perfect union" around this radical idea.

Emma Garten
66
 

American Children's Relics of 1700-1800s

This collection showcases furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. that represent the American children of the 1700-1800s. This period exhibits the transition time between being considered a 2nd class citizen living in a British colony to learning what it means to be an American. The American Revolution lasted from 1775 to 1783 ultimately ending in a victory for the patriots. With the war won and independence gained, America took her first steps into a journey of discovery. 

The first object in this collection starts from the beginning (or a little before) the Revolution and the last items is documented around 1859, well into American culture growing and forming into it's own. Specifically, the items here focus on the lives of the children of this historic moment that may not even understand the revolution going on around them. The objects reflect British influence and American pioneering. These relic grasp the material culture of the first generation of children that were born "Americans."

Heidi Chong
11
 

American Bald Eagle

How did the bald eagle become the symbol of America? What symbolism did Native Americans find in the bald eagle?
This Collection of resources on the American bald eagle includes images, videos, sculptures, and stamps that depict the American bald eagle.
Linda Muller
17
 

American Art

In American history, art was an important aspect of everyday life for the colonists. Their expressions of art came in many forms such as sculptures, paintings, dishes, quilts and metalwork. As showcased on some the collections, they used this artwork to express their views on certain problems they were faced with such as the Stamp Act teapot. For other pieces of artwork it was a way to show off wealth. The dishes and portraits in the collection displayed a form of wealth to colonists in this period of time. Today, arts displayed in homes are still shown as a form of wealth. Although modern art is much different than those shown in this collection, these various forms of art have influenced the art we create today.

Maci Sims
10
 

American Art

In American history, art was an important aspect of everyday life for the colonists. Their expressions of art came in many forms such as sculptures, paintings, dishes, quilts and metalwork. As showcased on some the collections, they used this artwork to express their views on certain problems they were faced with such as the Stamp Act teapot. For other pieces of artwork it was a way to show off wealth. The dishes and portraits in the collection displayed a form of wealth to colonists in this period of time. Today, arts displayed in homes are still shown as a form of wealth. Although modern art is much different than those shown in this collection, these various forms of art have influenced the art we create today.

Maci Sims
10
 

American Abolitionists

This collection is adapted from a collection created by Tess Porter - National History Day: Abolitionists.

In support of research related to American abolitionists, resources - including portraits, articles, primary source documents, videos, and websites - highlight four abolitionists profiled in American Experience film The Abolitionists and the National Youth Summit on Abolition: William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Brown. Additional resources related to abolitionism and other important abolitionists are located at the end. Refer to each collection tile for summaries of individual resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

Justine Thain
58
 

America support for the French in World War 2 #TeachingInquiry

This collection focuses on the time when America joined with the Allies to defeat Germany in World War 2. 

My compelling question is: What impact did the arrival of the Americans have in the occupied villages in France in World War 2?

Ros Mattner
8
 

America in the 1960's

To be used to delve into setting for S.E. Hinton's "The Outsiders."

Sarah Parham-Giannitti
15
 

America and the Holocaust

This collection serves as an exploration of America’s direct involvement in the Holocaust. Through the use of American propaganda, stories of the rescue and liberation of Jewish people in Europe, and images of remembrance and memorial, this exhibit intends to shed light on the bleak but often romanticized narrative that is the United States’ response to the Holocaust. The exhibit focuses on America’s role in helping to stop the Holocaust, or at certain points their lack thereof, though the nation’s contributions to the situation through their belief systems, actions, and policies. The exhibit seeks to explore the contrast of anti-Semitism in American citizens and those who fought to free the victims of anti-Semitism in Europe, in addition to However, what is drawn from this idea is what we remember in our collective memory. While remembering those who suffered, as well as those who rescued the suffering, the United States must not dismiss the prevalence of anti-Semitism in America at the time of the mass genocide, whether it was in the form of anti-Jewish rallies or in the form of legislation.

sarah afromsky
16
 

America and the Holocaust

This collection will take a deeper look into anti semitism in America juxtaposed to the upstanders who fought back.  By looking at the Holocaust in American society through this dual lense, it illustrates the two extremes in the society.  Bitter and severe hatred was seen on one side as anti semitsm was fueled by racist and elitist attitudes.  But this does not tell the whole story; many efforts were taken by Americans, specifically the Jewish American community, to raise awareness for the cause and in many instances take active steps to help those suffering in Europe.

Allie Doyle
17
 

America and the Holocaust

This collection addresses the issue of antisemitism in the United States leading up to and during the Holocaust.  Anti semitism was displayed in America through cartoons, preferences of American citizens, discriminatory policies, as well as support for the Nazi party. There was anti semitism present throughout America, and such anti semitism became obvious through a lack of action during the Holocaust.  Juxtaposed against this striking anti semitism are the American people and groups that worked to help Jews and fought for their equality.  Despite the inaction promoted through anti semitism, many groups did work against discrimination and the Nazi goal.

Fiona Mulla
17
 

America & the Holocaust Museum Curation Project


The Holocaust was a horrific genocide that killed 6 million Jewish people. It is one of the best documented genocides, but many people do not understand the small role that America played in aiding the Jews during the Holocaust. Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was the president during World War II took minimal efforts to help the Jews in concentration camps throughout Europe. The American government passed Immigration Policies that prevented Jews from immigrating to the United States and covered up the severity of the atrocities that were being committed in Europe during the Holocaust. Anti Semitism was prevalent in the United States and many americans fought against aiding Jews in the Holocaust because they did not accept them. Finally, the American Media made efforts during the Holocaust to help the people of the United States become aware of the horrendous treatment of Jews that was occurring in Europe during the Holocaust. However, the media’s efforts like those of some Americans, who tried to sway public opinion to support American intervention in the Holocaust, were unsuccessful in bringing the United States to help Jews during the Holocaust.

Meaghan Rossignol
16
 

America & Athletics

Christina Ratatori
13
 

Amelia Earhart: America's Aviatrix

Students will use the elements of portrayal to analyze portraits of Amelia Earhart and listen to a speech to learn biographic details.

#NPGteach

Christy Ting
10
1585-1608 of 1,739 Collections