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Taking the Pulse of Our Planet’s Forests: ForestGEO Ngel Nyaki

Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian is joining with local communities and the Nigerian Montane Forest Project to better understand and conserve montane forests in Nigeria. To learn more, go to /https://global.si.edu/success-stories/taking-pulse-our-planet’s-forests-forestgeo-ngel-nyaki

Innovative Lives: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History
February 8, 2018 Innovative Lives: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Presented at the National Museum of American History by the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.

Explore Smithsonian: How do Orchids Attract Pollinators?

Smithsonian Science Education Center
The Smithsonian Gardens Orchid Collection has over 8,000 living specimens and is a valuable source of research and species diversity. Discover why orchids are unique and how researchers are maintaining the collection. ---- If you enjoyed our Explore Smithsonian videos, share them with a friend, colleague, or a teacher in your life. And be sure to connect with us online! Our Website: http://s.si.edu/1RtrHsO STEMVisions Blog: http://s.si.edu/1de3GIH Facebook: http://s.si.edu/1Hc9Rt0 Twitter: http://s.si.edu/1GmsSVR Pinterest: http://s.si.edu/IJtdLq Google+: http://s.si.edu/1SGMzzj

Measuring Fish with Sonar

Smithsonian TMON
MarineGEO scientists track the secret lives of hidden fish.

Sewing Salmon 6 (of 10): Learning from Native Artists

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

National Design Awards 2009 - Winners' Panel

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
2009 National Design Award winners participate in a panel discussion about their inspiration and drive as designers and the state of contemporary design in America. Moderator: Walter Hood, HOOD Design, Landscape Design Winner Panelists include: Amory Lovins, Rocky Mountain Institute, Design Mind Winner Andrew Blauvelt, Walker Arts Center, Corporate / Institutional Winner Christopher Sharples, SHoP Architects, Architecture Winner Laurene Boym, Boym Partners, Product Design Winner Calvin Tsao, TsAO & McKOWN Architects, Interior Design Winner Jeff Han, Perceptive Pixel, Interaction Design Winner Steve Duenes, New York Times Graphics Department, Communications Design Winner

Bringing It Home 04: Anita Paillamil Antiqueo

National Museum of the American Indian
Bringing It Home: Artists Reconnecting Cultural Heritage with Community is a public program for the 2014 participants in the museum's Artist Leadership Program. In this segment, Anita Paillamil Antiqueo (Mapuche) gives an overview of her work. Antia is a textile weaver who is excited about coming to the Smithsonian to research Mapuche photographs, textiles and iconography and then share this information with approximately 180 Mapuche women who belong to the Indigenous Association Wallontu Witral cooperative, near Temuco, Chile. This program was webcast from fourth floor of the National Museum of the American Indian on December 10, 2014.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 2

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original metal film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the second in a collection of nine films.

There is an inscription on the metal canister in red ink that is partially obscured by two whtie labels, visible is [ance # 2]. The '2' has been written over again in black ink, and below it is [SEE LIST] also in black ink. Written on the adhesive labels in black ink is [Oklahoma - Jones / This is on video 2].

The film opens with people dressed in semi-formal attire leaving the front door of a building. The next scene shows a woman shaking hands of people leaving the front door. Then same woman is then shown feeding chickens. The next scene shows the Mount Olive Baptist Church where S. S. Jones was the pastor. The next series of footage shows sheep in a field, two women and a girl on a front porch, and one of the women driving a car and exiting it to return to the porch. There is footage of the Langston, Oklahoma, post office, and cars pulling up to a gas station. The next scene shows a parade with soldiers in uniform followed by a group of men and then a group of women, perhaps students from the Colored Agricultural and Normal University (now Langston University). A man feeds chickens in the next scene that also shows a farmhouse and poultry houses. Several well-dressed men walk around outside. The next footage shows a group of several buildings, perhaps the university that the students paraded in front of earlier in the film. The following scene shows a man and a woman in front of a store with ducks. That is followed by footage of men and women picking cotton in a field. The next scene shows picked cotton in wagons pulled by horses. The cotton is removed from the wagons using a long tube attached to a building. The next footage shows cotton coming out of a door wrapped up in bales. The men roll the cotton out of the door. The next scene shows a large house with a car pulling up in front of it, then there is footage of a steam locomotive pulling passenger rail cars. The next scene shows men walking out of a store with a "Meat-Market" sign hanging over the front door. There is also some footage of the store interior. The next scene shows men and women dressed in semi-formal attire leaving the front door of what appears to be a school. A different school building that people exit in the next scene is identified as Vernon High School.

Hands of Inge

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The 16mm black and white film serves as a short introduction to the work and methodology of acclaimed African American sculptor Inge Hardison. The film, made relatively early in her career, details her working processes with clay, bronze, and wire. The camera largely focuses on her hands, although there are also some shots that include her full body and the model, a young girl, Hardison's daughter, Yolande. The jazz music soundtrack features Mal Waldron, Eric Dolphy, Ron Carter, and Toni Ross. Hortense Beveridge edited the film. There is some voiceover narration by Ossie Davis.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a), Original 400 foot Film Reel (b), and Original 400 foot Can (c).

2012.79.1.9.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with close-ups of Hardison's hands as she displays some tools, cuts a piece of metal, and begins the process of making clay for sculpture. The next scene shows her hands working with metal wire and wood and using wire cutters as she twists the metal around another object. At this point in the film, the narration by Ossie Davis begins. He introduces Hardison and then the camera shot pulls back to show her working on a sculpture on a waist-high table. All of the materials from the previous scene appear to have been used in the sculpture she is working on. The camera shot returns to a close-up of her hands as she molds the clay around the wire. As she continues to work, the clay is molded into the shape of a human head, and Davis reveals that she is creating a bust of Martin Luther King, Jr. The next scenes show some of her other sculpture, including one of Father John Coleman of Brooklyn, Nellie Carrington from the book Smokey Town Road written by Hardison, Elaine Atwell, and her niece Minnie Hardison. The montage of her works ends with a small full nude sculpture. The next scene shows a close-up of hands working on a sculpture of her daughter. Then the footage shows her daughter and compares her to the sculpture with sporadic narration by Davis. He then explains how she is preparing the sculpture to be made into bronze. The next scene shows her hands using pliers to work with wire. The final design shown is a man made of wire in a running position. The film ends with a montage of her hands with and without tools.

2012.79.1.9.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

2012.79.1.9.1c: Original 400 foot film can. The metal can has a sticker label from a film company on one side and a hand written note taped on to the other side.

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #5

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond, Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.5.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with various exterior shots of a church. This is followed by a long shot of buildings through a wooded area. Brief interior shots of a home show a kitchen and living room area with a silhouetted woman sitting off to the side. More exterior long shots of the church follow. The films ends with footage of homes and a town shot from inside of a moving car.

2016.16.5.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #11

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (c), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.11.1a: 8mm film. The film begins with a series of shots of a group of people in Paris filling a car to capacity with luggage. This is followed by a shot of a group of people posed in front of the Eiffel Tower. Next, the film depicts people gathering and greeting one another outside Royal Albert Hall in London for the Baha'i World Faith Congress. Linda Holman stands in the center of a group of people wearing a headscarf tied around her chin and a jacket with a fur collar. Linda Holman then appears in another shot wearing a white jacket and a light colored headband. Among those in the crowd are people clothed in Mexican charro suits and South Asian saris. The film concludes with a wide shot of the proceedings of the congress within the concert hall.

2016.31.3.11.1b: Original film reel.

2016.31.3.11.1c: Original film box. Standard yellow Kodachrome 8mm film box with handwritten mailing addresses for processing film. Includes a brief handwritten content note.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #28

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (c), and Original Film Can (c).

2016.31.3.28.1a: 8mm film. This film consists of series of shots depicting the Holman family, primarily the children, playing and mugging for the camera in the front yard and driveway of a home in San Francisco. The film begins with Linda Holman wearing a white dress with her hair in pigtails. She plays with Michael Holman who wears a white shirt and gray shorts. The film then shows Linda wearing a Catholic school uniform with a white shirt, navy sweater and plaid skirt. Keith Holman appears as a newborn, wrapped in a blanket. There are also shots of the children in a the school yard of E.R. Taylor Elementary School, where Michael attended first grade. Linda Holman wears a white dress and carries flowers around on the playground after her first Holy Communion. Michael Holman wears a red shirt under a beige overcoat and follows her around. The next shot shows Keith Holman sitting in a stroller wearing a yellow sweater and bonnet. Other children and neighbors appear in some of the shots. Near the end of the film, the motherAlice Holman, wearing a pink top and black skirt, holds Keith Holman and joins her children in posing for the camera.

2016.31.3.28.1b: Original film reel. Gray plastic with brief content notes

2016.31.3.28.1c: Original film can. Metal with tape content labels.

Our Solar-Powered Evolution

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
Did natural selection favor darker skin tones? Professor Nina Jablonski never believed that cancer could have an effect on the evolution of skin color, and new research may prove her right.
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Chief Veterinarian Suzan Murray

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
Suzan Murray, Chief Veterinarian at the National Zoo, describes her childhood dream of becoming a veterinarian and makes a special trip to visit her favorite elephant, Shanthi.
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Janet Kavandi: No Place Like Space

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
Yearning to be among the stars led Janet Kavandi to a fulfilling career with NASA.
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Researching the Frozen Abyss

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
Scientist Julie Hall braves the icy waters and freezing temperatures of Antarctica to collect valuable scientific data.
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Interview with the Expert: Sharon Wilson Purdy

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
For planetary geologist Sharon Wilson Purdy, life on Earth sparked an interest in life on Mars. Her ongoing research could one day answer the question: Is there life on Mars?
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Interview with the Expert: Eva Pell

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
For Smithsonian's Under Secretary for Science Eva Pell, science has been a lifelong journey of discovery.
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Interview with the Expert: Katie Moore

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
Astronomy educator Katie Moore is teaching Smithsonian visitors to see the skies in a whole new light.
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Interview with the Expert: Carla Dove

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
The last name gives it away; Carla Dove's area of expertise is ornithology. As a forensic ornithologist she aims to make the skies a safer place for birds and planes.
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Interview with the Expert: Valerie Neal

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
Space History Curator, Valerie Neal is living her dream as the guardian of some of America's most valued spacecraft treasures.
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Interview with the Expert: Maria Banks

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
From Antarctic ice sheets to Hawaiian volcanoes, Maria Banks' scientific research on Earth is shedding light on the geology of distant planets.
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The Elusive Clouded Leopard

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
A team of Thai researchers has been tracking the clouded leopard for three years - without even a glimpse.
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Seymour the Shark

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service Podcasts
This is one laid-back zebra shark. Seymour the shark will flip over on his back to allow veterinarians to take an ultrasound.
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15361-15384 of 15,389 Resources