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Found 2,016 Collections

 

Digital Museum Resources for the High School Ethnic Studies Classroom (City of Austin Parks & Recreation)

This collection includes digital museum resources and replicable activities that will serve as a springboard for discussion during the Exploration of Ethnic Studies workshop at the  City of Austin Parks & Recreation Department on October 29-30, 2019. The collection models how digital museum resources can be leveraged to support critical thinking and deeper learning for high school Ethnic Studies curricula. The collection can be copied and adapted for use in your own classroom. 

This collection was co-created with Ashley Naranjo.  This program received Federal support from the Latino and Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pools, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

#EthnicStudies


Philippa Rappoport
52
 

Digital Collections Project

Masculinity in African Cultures

Joseph Washington
5
 

Different Types of Ceramics During the Consumer Revolution

This collection contains ceramics that typical people would have in their household to either use or place for decoration during the late 17th century and early 18th century. This time period was known as the Consumer Revolution. During the Consumer Revolution, many people obtained more money, which caused many people to have left over money after spending it on their basic necessities. Therefore, the only way to differentiate social status was by the types and amount of goods you had. This made people to start purchasing things such as fancy china sets, nice looking furniture, beautiful portraits, and expensive clothing. However, the main focus of this collection is looking at fancy china sets that people had during the Consumer Revolution because China glasses was mass produced and common during this time. Producer of the ceramics would make anything from pots, cups, bowls, and plates. 

Austin Kim
10
 

Did the Industrial Revolution Make Life Better for Everyone?

A collection focused on teaching the Industrial Revolution. The artifacts found in this collection are intended to be used as part of an Inquiry Design Model (IDM). Within the IDM, images could not only be used within staging the question, but also to help students build contextual knowledge under the supporting questions of (1) what changes were made in manufacturing, (2) how did society benefit from industrialization, and (3) what were the challenges society faced during industrialization? #C3Framework #TeachingInquiry
Jennifer Fraker
17
 

Did the Black Panther Party Help or Hurt the Civil Rights Movement?

#TeachingInquiry

1. What did members of the Black Panther Party look like?
2. How did the Black Panther Party help their communities?
3. How was the Black Panther Party viewed by those outside the group?

Richard Duffy
30
 

Did American women [or the women of your state] deserve the right to vote in the early 20th century?

Who had the right to vote in the US [or your state] by the early 20th century?; What roles did women play in society at this time?; Who supported and opposed women's suffrage and why?

Though the answer to this compelling question might feel obvious to 21st century Americans, the issue was far from settled at the time. This dichotomy adds to its intellectual heft and engages students' inherent interest in fairness, discrimination, and rights. (It also connects to ongoing debates about the franchise and who is entitled to it.) The supporting questions invite students to learn more about voting in the time period, the changing roles played by women, and the people who might have supported or opposed women's political equality, all of which help scaffold students' investigations into the ideas and issues behind this compelling question.

#TeachingInquiry

Kristen Levithan
6
 

Developing Historical Thinkers with American Art

Resources supporting the February 2016 Google Hangout facilitated by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

#historicalthinking


Elizabeth Dale-Deines
11
 

Destination Moon: Origins of the Space Race

This topical collection introduces events that shaped the origin of the Space Race; its connections to World War II, rocketry, nuclear development, and the Cold War. 

After exploring the collection, students will have a better understanding of how the Space Race evolved from a specific group of geopolitical events. This collection introduces figures from American politics and outlines international events that pushed the United States to  mobilize around the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs. 

Students begin by watching the overview video. The resources that follow include metadata summaries, quiz questions, and hotspots to draw attention to details in each resource, and provide an overview of the complex geopolitical situation. This collection is best used as a primer to the space race and could be enhanced by further discussion. 

Christina Ferwerda
14
 

Destination Moon: EO 10925, Civil Rights, and the Space Program

This collection of resources uses oral histories as well as photographs and articles to explore race relations and the impact of Executive Order 10925 at NASA. Signed by President John F. Kennedy on March 6, 1961, EO 10925 required government contractors to "take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed and that employees are treated during employment without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin."

Resources in this collection -  photographs and articles as well as oral histories - are compiled to supplement the SITES traveling exhibit Destination Moon. This collection is not comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection is closely associated with the "Destination Moon" traveling exhibit. For more information see https://airandspace.si.edu/exh...



Christina Ferwerda
10
 

Destination Moon: Apollo Around the Country

This collection explores regional contractors that contributed to the Apollo Program. Union Carbide, North American Aviation, and RCA are just three of the many private firms that contributed goods and services to NASA during the race to put a man on the Moon. 

Have students examine the map of NASA contractors. Ask: 

  • What companies do you know? 
  • Which are closest? Farthest away?
  • What do you wonder about these companies? Their locations? 

Have students investigate the images in the collection. Discuss: 

  • What do you see? What do you think about that? 
  • What types of products or materials were needed on the Apollo mission? 
  • How did companies take advantage of their association with Manned Spaceflight? 

Using the map, encourage students to find items produced by other manufacturers on this database by searching the manufacturer name. Compare the products associated with different companies - what types of products do they see, and what types of products are missing? Are there advantages to having certain things produced closer to the launch site? What types of items could be produced farther away? 

Invite students to find other Apollo-related advertisements from the period using the Internet. What can be said about these advertisements? 

Invite students to create their own advertisement based on the items they find here, as well as research about the NASA-contracted company. 

Christina Ferwerda
12
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin

This topical collection explores the life of Lunar Module Pilot  Buzz Aldrin; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Aldrin's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut



Christina Ferwerda
6
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong

This topical collection explores the life of Mission Commander Neil A. Armstrong; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn influential aspects of Armstrong's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Armstrong, space, space race, astronaut


Christina Ferwerda
11
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins

This topical collection explores the life of Command Module Pilot Michael Collins; it includes images, artifact images, and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Collins' life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included. 

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut

Christina Ferwerda
8
 

Designing For Accessibility–Tova Kleiner

This Learning Lab showcases different examples of accessible design in order to provide a fuller understanding of what designing for accessibility can look like. The collection shown here includes designs that address physical, cognitive, and emotional barriers that impact the lives of people with disabilities. This Learning Lab explores design for the blind, for wheelchair accessibility, for the elderly, and for people with autism. Through the DesignPrep Scholars program, I have learned about various design disciplines and focuses. DesignPrep Scholars gave me the opportunity to meet several inspirational designers and do many design projects. Throughout this experience, I have been especially drawn to design that is inclusive and accessible. This Learning Lab is the culmination of my work at DesignPrep Scholars and displays what I have learned about accessible design.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
22
 

Designing a Better Voting Machine: 1880s to Today

Objects are time capsules; they embody values, aspirations, or problems of a particular time and place and mark a stage of technological evolution. This student activity examines voting machines used in U.S. elections over more than a century. Looking closely and understanding the historical objects’ design evolution will inform students’ design of new machine intended to overcome barriers to voting in today's elections. 

The first five images are voting machines from the late 1800s to the early 2000s. Students will explore their parts, purposes, and complexities, then read the Washington Post article "Broken machines, rejected ballots and long lines: voting problems emerge as Americans go to the polls." Finally, students will design (and may prototype) a voting machine.

This collection incorporates two Project Zero Agency by Design routines: Parts, Purposes, Complexities, a routine for looking closely; and Imagine If..., a routine for finding opportunity. Questions in each routine are open-ended and should be used to spark peer discussion in small groups or as a class. For more information on how to use and facilitate each routine, see their resource tiles at the end of the collection, as well as the Agency by Design website.

Keywords: vote, voter, maker, making 

Tess Porter
13
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 6-8 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 9-10 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Derek Pyatt - 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This collection is to give examples of items which portray what life is like during the 1920's and 1930's.

Derek Pyatt
10
 

Depictions of Children

Viewers will consider how images of children have changed over the past 300 years. Artwork selections include a large variety of individual and group portraits of both male and female sitters/subjects in a variety of styles for the purpose of analyzing the elements of portraiture (expression, pose, clothing, hairstyle, setting, objects, etc...) in order to help students gain a better understanding of social norms in the context of place and time. This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018Learning to look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Michelle Zimmerman
60
 

Demanding the Vote: The Woman Suffrage Movement

This collection brings together objects and resources from the Smithsonian Institution that examine the woman suffrage movement and its enduring impacts. Using these artifacts and primary resources, engage students in a thoughtful discussion to analyze the guiding question: How did women use their first amendment rights to demand the vote? 

For a full lesson plan and videos on this topic, check out the National Museum of American History's "The Suffragist" classroom resources.

Additional information and resources can be found in the museum's online exhibition American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith

National Museum of American History
35
 

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

This playlist on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write an argumentative essay answering one of three questions.

National Museum of American History
59
 

Decoding Lincoln: Vocabulary Coding with the Gettysburg Address

This collection provides background knowledge for students while they analyze Abraham Lincoln's word choice in his speech the Gettysburg Address. Students will then participate in a vocabulary coding activity to build comprehension of the message in the speech.
Steps in Vocabulary Coding:
1. Start with a gateway question (a question to get students into the text in a non-threatening way that requires no prior knowledge or comprehension) Which word appears most often in The Gettysburg Address? Identify the word. Is it used in the same form or part of speech throughout the text? Present the text as a puzzle to solve.
2. Read aloud the Gettysburg address while students follow along.
3. Practice Coding: Directions: Code important words with a plus sign "+" above known words, and a minus sign"-" above unknown words.
Get with a partner and compare words, then list them in a T-chart.
4. After teams have selected words, the teacher briefly provides a 5 W’s and H background for the text using the slides in the collection: Who wrote it, What was it about, When was it written, Where was it set, Why was it written, and How was the text presented. For more rigor and if time allows, give teams of students one image from the collection to research and present as background knowledge for the class.
5. Group defines words: Partners whip around to share word choices, then chart words (tally repeated words.)
Choose at least six "minus" words to chart as a class and briefly define with synonyms or short phrases.
6. Teacher assigns one section of the text per group. Group finds and selects shortest definition for that word in the context of the text and summarizes the main idea of that section of text.
7. Teams share word definitions and summary while class annotates.
8. Finally, each team picks at least three of the important vocabulary words to write a group summary of the text in 1-2 sentences (starting with 5 W’s + H). Then each individual student writes a personal response to the text (how they feel, the historical impact, the meaning of the text today, etc.) using at least three new vocabulary words from the text. Highlight vocab words, and share writing with partner.



Kathy Powers
24
 

Declaration of Independence Resources

A collection of resources related to Thomas Jefferson and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. It can be edited or analyzed from a number of POVs.

Amy Kerr
5
 

Declaration of Independence Resources

A topical collection of resources related to the Declaration of Independence that provides context. (1) Jefferson's mobile desk, on which the Declaration was drafted, (2) the scene of its drafting, (3) the audio and text of the document, (4) a lesson plan focuses on how it came about, how it was designed and the compromises that were necessary, (5) an online exhibition featuring Thomas Paine and his pamphlet 'Common Sense', another resource on what led to the Declaration, and (6) a commemorative bandanna of the original document suggests how the Declaration was valued.
Ashley Naranjo
9
1465-1488 of 2,016 Collections