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Where to Sell Your Soul for the Delta Blues

Smithsonian Channel
Where Robert Johnson sold his soul to the Devil and where the first juke joints started playing a new kind of American music, Clarksdale is the birthplace of Delta Blues. From the Show: Aerial America: Mississippi http://bit.ly/2hDUaTR

Whetstone Punch Cocktail Recipe: Raise a Glass to History

Smithsonian Channel
Mix up a new classic American cocktail at home with this step-by-step guide to the Whetstone Punch, Phoebe Esmon & Christian Gaal's original cocktail creation for Smithsonian's Raise a Glass to History. From: A STAR-SPANGLED STORY: BATTLE FOR AMERICA http://bit.ly/1rPAygi

Which Dress Would You Wear on the Red Carpet?

Smithsonian Channel
A red carpet dilemma for up-and-coming artist Rai Alexandra: dress in 1950s glamor or go the femme fatale route? For once, Doris is stumped. From: L.A. FROCK STARS: The Golden Age of Hollywood http://bit.ly/1KTb0Yf

Which Famous Music Icons Lived in These Chicago Homes?

Smithsonian Channel
Chicago has always been a hotbed of musical talent: whether it be Muddy Waters who moved there in 1943, or Kanye West who spent his childhood years in the Windy City. From the Series: Aerial Cities: Chicago 24 http://bit.ly/2GQzYOb

Which National Park Draws 25 Million Visitors a Year?

Smithsonian Channel
The National Mall attracts an unbelievable amount of visitors each year. Here's what they come to see. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Washington, DC http://bit.ly/1NjL9Gr

Whisker Coral Polyps Closing

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Watch as these whisker coral polyps close, then later reopen.

Whistler and Art of the Americas

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Whistler and Art of the Americas Erica Hirshler Croll Senior Curator of American Paintings, Art of the Americas Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Palaces of Art: Whistler and the Art Worlds of Aestheticism Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art October 27--28, 2011

Whistler in Watercolor at the Freer|Sackler

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
The story behind the exhibition, Whistler in Watercolor, featuring curator Lee Glazer, director of the Lunder Institute for American Art at Colby College.

Whistler in Watercolor at the Freer|Sackler Promo

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
May 18, 2019–October 6, 2019 Freer, gallery 10–11 For renowned artist James McNeill Whistler (1834–1903), watercolor was the medium through which he reinvented himself in the 1880s and painted his way into posterity. No one was more smitten with Whistler and his works than museum founder Charles Lang Freer, who amassed the world’s largest collection of watercolors by the artist and included them in his bequest to the Smithsonian in 1906. Freer’s collection comprises more than fifty examples—figures, landscapes, nocturnes, and interiors—of Whistler’s watercolors, yet these works have never left the confines of the Freer Gallery of Art. Whistler in Watercolor introduces museum visitors to the artist’s vast creative output and provides wide access to a rarely seen segment of his work.

Whistler, Aestheticism, and the Networked World

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Whistler, Aestheticism, and the Networked World Melody Barnett Deusner Terra Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in American Art Northwestern University, Evanston Palaces of Art: Whistler and the Art Worlds of Aestheticism Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art October 27--28, 2011

White House Chef Makes a "Willy Wonka" Holiday Treat

Smithsonian Channel
A former White House chef learns about Willy Wonka and creates a delicious holiday masterpiece. From: WHITE HOUSE REVEALED http://bit.ly/1n5jUq0

White House Maker Faire & ARTLAB+

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
President Obama gives ARTLAB+ and Akilah a shout out when he mentions the "papercraft dinosaur head in the hallway" at the first White House Maker Faire! Go Akilah!

White House Revealed (Full Episode)

Smithsonian Channel
The president isn't the only one who works in the White House. From devoted doormen to enthusiastic chefs, the country's most famous home depends on a staff of dedicated individuals who serve president after president. From: WHITE HOUSE REVEALED http://bit.ly/21VXcmE

White Mountain National Forest

Smithsonian Channel
Whether on foot, by raft or from a car, no experience of the White Mountain National Forest beats the view from above. From: AERIAL AMERICA: New Hampshire http://bit.ly/1o6BcTP

White dwarf stars orbiting and merging animation

Office of Public Affairs
Astronomers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have found a pair of white dwarf stars orbiting each other once every 39 minutes. In a few million years, they will merge and reignite as a helium-burning star. This animation shows the merger process. Credit: Clay Ellis (CfA)

White-throated Sparrow

Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
White-throated sparrow feeding on ground. Recorded by Gregory Gough.

White-throated Sparrow

Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
White-throated sparrow foraging on the ground near Rock Creek at the National Zoo in Washington, DC. Recorded by Gregory Gough.

White-throated Sparrow

Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
A parent comes in to feed the youngsters and then waits for them to defecate and removes the fecal sac. By Brent Horton .

Who Built the Great Sphinx?

Smithsonian Channel
Until recently, experts thought that King Djedefre was a murderer and outcast who couldn't possibly have had the power to create the Great Sphinx. But new evidence makes him a more likely candidate. From: SECRETS: The Sphinx http://bit.ly/1pl7F5o

Who Decided to Put 60 Seconds in a Minute?

Smithsonian Channel
One highly influential ancient Middle Eastern civilization established some of the essential systems we still use today. Think you know which it is? From: EAST MEETS WEST: The Birth of Civilization http://bit.ly/1njurjn

Who Else Did John Wilkes Booth Plan to Kill?

Smithsonian Channel
John Wilkes Booth planned to kill Lincoln and two other members of his cabinet. And he wanted the murders to all happen at the same time. From: LINCOLN'S LAST DAY http://bit.ly/1gRzepO

Who Is Tian Tian?

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
The flower plaque at the entrance to China: Tradition and the Art of Living at the 2014 Folklife Festival prominently features a character named Tian Tian. Created by artist Danny Yung, the blank boyish figure represents curiosity and the desire to learn and explore. Editing: Ed Fry, Charlie Weber [Catalog No. CFV10643; Copyright 2014 Smithsonian Institution]

Who Really Invented Monopoly?

Smithsonian Channel
Monopoly, arguably the most-famous board game, was invented by Charles Darrow. But many attribute the original idea to Lizzie Magie, a Quaker and the creator of the Landlord's Game, which bears striking resemblance to its more-popular successor. From: MY MILLION DOLLAR INVENTION: Guns and Goldmines http://bit.ly/1Dh47cz

Who Said the Victorians Were Prudish About Sex?

Smithsonian Channel
The Victorian era was famously uptight about all things sexual; but you wouldn’t have guessed it based on the life on Queen Victoria’s second son, Albert "Bertie" Edward – a man of prodigious sexual appetites. From the Series: Private Lives of Monarchs: http://bit.ly/2HvbpDR
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