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What Do These Trees Have to Reveal About UFOs?

Smithsonian Channel
Tree samples at an alleged UFO crash site outside Pittsburgh reveal a dramatic decrease in growth around 1965--the same year many locals reported a mysterious, bright object in the skies. From: UFOS DECLASSIFIED: Roswell Report http://bit.ly/1N6igwL

What Do These Turkish Forts Tell Us About the Arab Revolt?

Smithsonian Channel
With almost no archeological evidence of the Great Arab Revolt, researchers take to the air to get a new perspective on the timeworn battlegrounds. From the Series: Mystery Files: Lawrence of Arabia http://bit.ly/2kX1FKm

What Do Tortoises Eat?

Smithsonian Channel
Consummate herbivores, tortoises have a healthy and hearty diet at Smithsonian's National Zoo. Here, caretakers walk us through what goes into their special salad mix. From: WILD INSIDE THE NATIONAL ZOO: Reptile Rejuvenation http://bitly.com/1DIGxcp

What Do Visitors Really Know about Evolution?

National Museum of Natural History

What Do You Do if a Giant Ship Can't Stay Balanced in Water?

Smithsonian Channel
The Yasin Bey, a unique hybrid of a power plant and giant ship, is in trouble. It's heavily unbalanced because of a problem with its ballast system. The crew scramble to find a solution, ahead of its imminent launch. From the Series: Mighty Ships: Yasin Bey http://bit.ly/2NF7pWl

What Do You Know About Snakes?

Smithsonian Channel
These five-year-olds know a thing or two about snakes, but what do they know about titanoboa?

What Do You Know About the Golden Gate Bridge?

Smithsonian Channel
Our country's most iconic bridge stretches across one of the world's finest natural harbors. From the Show: Aerial America: California http://bit.ly/2yrnkjB

What Do da Vinci and World-Record Skydiver Alan Eustace Have in Common? – STEM in 30

National Air and Space Museum
In 2014, Alan Eustace set the world record for the highest altitude jump at 135,899 feet. Learn about his journey and find out about the daredevils who preceded Eustace. More info: airandspace.si.edu/stemin30

What Does Biodiversity Do?

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)

What Does Biodiversity Do?

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Coral reefs have tremendous diversity, but what does that diversity do? Is one crab different from another? One coral really that different from the next? Join Smithsonian scientist Seabird McKeon and colleagues at the Carrie Bow Cay Marine Station, Belize to find out! Send questions on twitter by tagging posts with #BiodiversityChat

What Does It Take to Make a Monster Snake?

Smithsonian Channel
Longer than a great white shark, bigger than a hippo - it takes the whole playground to show how long titanoboa really was

What Does a Harpsichord Sound Like?

Smithsonian Music
Kenneth Slowik, curator of Musical Instrument Collection at National Museum of American History and artistic director of the Smithsonian Chamber Music Society, shows us how he plays the harpsichord.

What Elephants Endure When Used as Tourist Attractions

Smithsonian Channel
An estimated 25% of all elephants born in Burma are captured and sold into the tourism trade. What's worse: They must be broken in first. From: WILD BURMA: Elusive Elephants http://bit.ly/1k06ASo

What Every Photographer Can Learn from Ansel Adams

Smithsonian Channel
Ansel Adams marched to the beat of his own drum and during his 65-year career, he raised landscape photography to a whole new level. From the Series: Stories From the Vaults: Random? http://bit.ly/2gfy5hO

What Everyday Life is Like for an Astronaut

Smithsonian Channel
Eating mac and cheese, going to work, and hanging out with friends - life on board the Space Shuttle isn't that different than life on earth. But with zero gravity and a view of outer space, it's definitely not humdrum! From the Series: Space Shuttle: Final Countdown http://bit.ly/2ykBeDt

What Exactly Was This Pilot Targeting?

Smithsonian Channel
In 1957, a Royal Air Force base in England picks up an unusually large target on radar. Two pilots scramble into the night sky to intercept and, if need be, engage it. To this day, though, questions about the target's identity linger. From: UFOS DECLASSIFIED: Locked On http://bit.ly/1TcVWXD

What Forensics Tell Us About This Odd Plane Crash

Smithsonian Channel
Forensic analysis of the engine from El-Al Flight 1862, which crashed on October 4, 1992, finds no explosive residue on it. But if it wasn’t terrorism, then what caused the crash? From the show Air Disasters: http://bit.ly/2fSR3r5

What Goes Into a 1920s Prohibition Cocktail

Smithsonian Magazine
Read more at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Wayne-B-Wheeler-The-Man-Who-Turned-Off-the-Taps.html Beverage expert Derek Brown shows how to make three cocktails from the early 20th century at his Washington, D.C. bar.

What Goes Up Must Come Down: Plummeting Through the Layers of the Atmosphere - STEM in 30

National Air and Space Museum
Alan Eustace's world record-breaking skydive started with a ride 25 miles into the stratosphere in a high-altitude balloon. He then plummeted through the increasingly dense atmosphere. Does the atmosphere change with altitude? What challenges did Eustace's team have to overcome to complete the jump? Learn all this and more on this episode of STEM in 30 from the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution. https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30

What Happened Here in 1861?

National Air and Space Museum
This video was filmed during the National Air and Space Museum's "Mr. Lincoln's Air Force" Family Day on Saturday, June 11, 2011. The event commemorated the 150th anniversary of Thaddeus Lowe's tethered ascent in a gas balloon, which attracted the support of President Lincoln and led to the creation of a balloon corps for the Union Army under Lowe's leadership. In this clip Dr. Tom Crouch, senior curator in the National Air and Space Museum's Aeronautics Division, describes the balloon ascension.

What Happened to Christopher McCandless

Smithsonian Channel
In 1992, Christopher McCandless set off to test if he could survive alone in the wilds of Alaska. It didn't go as planned. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Alaska http://bit.ly/1yGcVZd

What Happened to the Holy Grail After the Last Supper?

Smithsonian Channel
Only one dining object from the Last Supper is specifically mentioned in the Bible: the Cup of Christ, also known as the Holy Grail. What happened to it after the death of Jesus is a subject of much debate. From: SECRETS: The Holy Grail http://bit.ly/1T4VleD

What Happens During Astronaut Training? Astronaut Victor Glover Explains - STEM in 30

National Air and Space Museum
Astronaut Victor Glover talks about some of the components of astronaut training, which includes training in a very large swimming pool and virtual reality training. More info: airandspace.si.edu/stem-30

What Happens When Lions Get Hungry

Smithsonian Channel
A pride of lions works together to bring down a stray water buffalo. From: THE PREDATOR COAST http://bit.ly/1AujH5o
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