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Nation to Nation: 09 Bad Acts / Bad Paper - Jennifer Nez Denetdale

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, and the notable book of the same title that accompanies the exhibition. In this segment, Jennifer Nez Denetdale speaks on the panel topic, "Bad Acts / Bad Paper." Jennifer Nez Denetdale (Diné [Navajo]) is the first citizen of the Navajo Nation to earn a doctorate in history, and is a commissioner on the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission. She is an associate professor of American studies at the University of New Mexico, specializing in Navajo history and culture; Native American women, gender, and feminism; and Indigenous Nations, colonialism, and decolonization. Denetdale has authored Reclaiming Diné History: The Legacies of Navajo Chief Manuelito and Juanita and two books on Navajo history for young adults. This symposium was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18. 2014.

Strong Women/Strong Nations 6: Panel 2, Tribal Governance

National Museum of the American Indian
"Strong Women/Strong Nations: Native American Women & Leadership" is a day-long symposium examining the complex identities of Native women through lively, insightful discussions by elected tribal leaders, activists, artists, and business leaders about the challenges, obstacles, and opportunities confronting women today. This segment features a panel entitled, "The Emergence of Women as Leaders in Tribal Governance." Native women are increasingly moving into leadership positions. This panel focuses on their experiences—and lessons learned for all women. It is moderated by Jodi Gillette (Standing Rock Sioux), Policy Advisor, Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP. The presenters include Kim Baird, Owner, Kim Baird Strategic Consulting; former Chief, Tsawwassen First Nation; Karen Diver, Special Assistant to the President for Native American Affairs, White House Domestic Policy Council; former Tribal Chairwoman, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa; and Lynn Valbuena, Tribal Chairwoman, San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. Jodi A. Gillette (Standing Rock Sioux) is currently a Policy Advisor for Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP, after serving in the Administration of President Barack Obama from 2009-2015. During her tenure under the Administration, she served as the Special Assistant to the President for Native American Affairs in the White House Domestic Policy Council, as the Deputy Assistant Secretary to the Assistant- Secretary Indian Affairs in the U.S. Department of the Interior, and as the Associate Director of WOMEN NATIONS Native American Women & Leadership Intergovernmental Affairs at the White House. Gillette was influential in advising President Obama on policy to improve the lives of Native Americans and strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship between the United States and Indian Tribes, and advancing the protection of Native women and children against violence. Kim Baird (Tsawwassen First Nation) is the owner of Kim Baird Strategic Consulting and offers services in relation to First Nation policy, governance, and economic development issues. Baird was the elected Chief of the Tsawwassen First Nation for six terms, from 1999-2012. She had the honor of negotiating and implementing British Columbia’s first urban treaty on April 3, 2009, and has since overseen numerous economic and institutional development projects for TFN. The recipient of a number of prestigious awards, Baird has been appointed to the Premier’s Aboriginal Business Investment Council and the Minister’s Advisory Council on Aboriginal Women. She is a trustee for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. Karen Diver (Chippewa) is Special Assistant to the President for Native American Affairs, White House Domestic Policy Council. In addition to serving as Chairwoman of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa for more than eight years, Diver also served as Vice President of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe; a member of the Board of Directors for the Corporation for Supportive Housing; a two-term Chair of the Boards of the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits and the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota; and a Presidential appointee to the State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resiliency. Diver has a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Minnesota, Duluth, and a Master in Public Administration from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Lynn Valbuena is Chairwoman of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians in Southern California. She has held numerous elected positions within the tribal government, including past terms as Chairwoman, Vice Chairwoman, and member of the Business Committee, which manages daily governmental operations on behalf of the General Council. She believes in community outreach, involvement with local organizations, and creating awareness of tribal traditions. In addition to her tribal government duties, Lynn is the chairwoman of the Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations, a coalition of tribes in California, and was an elected officer for the National Indian Gaming Association. She is a trustee for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Los Angeles-based Autry National Center. In 2015, Valbuena was inducted into the American Gaming Association’s Gaming Hall of Fame. The symposium was webcast and recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on March 18, 2016.

Time-lapse of prism spectra at the National Museum of the American Indian, September 2015

National Museum of the American Indian
On sunny days, prisms set high in a south window of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., spill bright spectra on the floor and walls of the Potomac Atrium. The path of these rainbow colors changes throughout the year, and the spectra line up in special ways on the equinox and solstice. This particular time-lapse, shot in HDR, was filmed on September 18, 2015, just a few days before the fall equinox and the anniversary of the opening of the museum on the National Mall. Charles Ross prism installation, National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.

Taíno Symposium – Session 2 – Carlalynne Yarey Meléndez

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center presented Taíno: A Symposium in Conversation with the Movement on September 8, 2018 to celebrate the exhibition Taíno: Native Heritage and Identity in the Caribbean. Experts representing Indigenous studies, genetic science, anthropology, linguistics, and other academic disciplines examined exhibition themes in dialogue with Taíno/Indigenous Caribbean community leaders and cultural workers. This session, titled Genetic Science and Genealogy: Recovering Native Ancestry, is a conversation among genetic, DNA, and anthropology experts. This segment features Carlalynne Yarey Meléndez, Naguake Community Administrator. Carlalynne Yarey MELÉNDEZ, PhD, is the founder and director of the Naguake Community-School Survival Center and the Naguake Indigenous Reeducation-Learning Center, both based in east-central Puerto Rico. In addition, Meléndez is the administrator and planner of Naguake Community, also located in the east-central part of the island. Her current research interests include Indigenous cultural-linguistic revitalization, community self-improvement, and community disaster preparation and survival. She uses a multidisciplinary approach that embraces anthropological, sociological, and geographical methods, including ethnography, environmental studies, and geographical information systems. This symposium was webcast and recorded live in at the National Museum of the American Indian New York, George Gustav Heye Center on September 8, 2018.

Indian Summer Showcase with Stevie Salas, Kinnie Starr, Jack Gladstone and Brulé

National Museum of the American Indian
This year's second Indian Summer Showcase concert features rock guitarist Stevie Salas (Apache) and fellow musician Bernard Fowler. Salas, discovered by George Clinton, has played alongside legends like Mick Jagger and Rod Stewart. Fowler is a singer-songwriter and musician who has performed with the Rolling Stones, Duran Duran and many more. Kinnie Star's (Mohawk) music blends hip hop and alternative rock. She was nominated for the Juno Award for New Artist of the Year in 2004. Jack Gladstone (Blackfeet), known as Montana's Blackfeet Troubador, has produced 15 critically acclaimed CDs. Brulé has sold more than a million CDs worldwide. The Native American group's performances in "sight, sound and soul" feature contemporary music accompanied by traditional dancers.

Hālau O 'Aulani - Hawaiian Dance

National Museum of the American Indian
Hālau O 'Aulani was founded in 1996 by Ku'ulei Stockman and Margo Schlotterbeck for the sole purpose of creating a learning environment for students interested in the preservation of the multi-faceted cultures of Hawai'i with primary emphasis on the Hawaiian culture. They have shared their "aloha" with the Hawai'i Visitors & Convention Bureau, Maui Visitors Bureau, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Washington Post, United Airlines, Smithsonian Institution, Members of the Hawai'i Congressional Delegation, Hawai'i State Society of Washington, D.C., Georgetown and George Washington Universities, USO (United Service Organizations), Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities, and Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts. . . to name a few. This performance took place on January 19, 2013 as part of the Out of Many multicultural festival of music, dance, and story.

Nation to Nation: 17 Great Nations Keep Their Word - Suzan Shown Harjo

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, and the notable book of the same title that accompanies the exhibition. In this segment, Susan Shown Harjo speaks on the panel topic, "Great Nations Keep Their Word." Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee), president of The Morning Star Institute, a national Indian rights organization founded in 1984, is a writer, curator, and policy advocate who has helped Native Nations recover sacred places and more than one million acres of land. Since 1975, she has developed key federal Indian law, including the most important national policy advances in the modern era for the protection of Native American ancestors, arts, cultures, languages, and religious freedom. A poet and an award-winning columnist, her work appears in numerous publications, and she received the Institute of American Indian Arts’ first honorary doctorate of humanities awarded to a woman. Dr. Harjo is a founder of the National Museum of the American Indian and has served as a guest curator and editor of this and various museum projects. This symposium was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18. 2014.

Indian Summer Showcase: Missy Knott

National Museum of the American Indian
Opening our Living Earth Festival music concert is Missy Knot, a First Nations singer-songwriter who is know as one of Ontario's rising young musical talents. She released her debut album "For No Reason At All…" (2009) when she was 19 and with that went on to win Peterborough Folk Festival's Emerging Artist Award as well as Toronto Exclusive Award's Best Pop CD. This performance was recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on July 19, 2014.

Patterns of Health and Wellbeing 03: Ohero:kon

National Museum of the American Indian
Health issues among American Indians, such as diabetes and substance abuse, are reaching epidemic levels. The majority of governmental and externally driven responses to these health issues have focused on the physical aspects of disease. Much less research has been done on the relationships between culture and health within Native communities. This symposium presents a report on active collaborations between Native community members and researchers that focus on the distinct cultural values about wellbeing held by Native communities in solving serious health issues. Cosponsored by the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. In section 3, Louise McDonald (Haudenosaunee-Mohawk) speaks on Ohero:kon: Orientations in the Values of Traditional Ritual Cycles of Life. In her presentation she speaks of community-based programs to promote wellbeing. Tewakierahkwa (Louise McDonald) is a Bear Clan Mother of the Mohawk Nation from the territory at Akwesasne, condoled in the traditional Chieftainship title of Tehanakarine (Dragging Horns) since 2005. The title has been in her family for almost 100 years. She is also a ceremonialist in moon-based rituals as well as lodger leader/conductor of the Moon Lodge Society. Working with women of all ages and tending to maternal and child wellness in her community, she conducts a coming of age ceremony called Ohero:kon ("Under the Husk") for adolescent youth in her community every spring. As clan mother, she bestows ancestral names upon newborns in her clan and has the vested matrilineal authority to select a man into chieftainship title. She works as a Healing Master for the St Regis Mohawk Tribe in a Remediation Project focused on cultural restoration. Patterns of Health and Wellbeing: An Intercultural Symposium was webcast from the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater on April 11, 2014.

Impacts of Climate Change: Our Rivers and Coasts

National Museum of the American Indian
Join our engaging, expert speakers for an important discussion of climate change-induced threats to our aquatic and coastal environments, and learn about restorative ecological strategies. Larry McDermott (Algonquin) will address the impacts of climate change and environmental degradation on the habitat of the American River Eel, while Tina Retasket (Siletz) will examine the effect of red tides on intertidal Siletz foods and the effect of climate change on the timing of coastal salmon runs. Eli Enns (Tla-o-qui-aht) will speak about building a conservation economy and adapting to climate change in tribal parks in the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, British Columbia, Canada.

The Great Inka Road: Saqsaywaman - Engineering at the Temple of the Sun

National Museum of the American Indian
José Alejandro Beltran-Caballero, Associate, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain, speaks on the Inka mastery of stonework and understanding of water management that are evident at Saqsaywaman, the religious and agricultural site that forms the head of the puma of Cusco. Produced for the exhibition "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire" (http://americanindian.si.edu/inkaroad/), on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., through June 1, 2018.

Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos 2016 - Dance of the Jaguar 3

National Museum of the American Indian
As in years past, the Smithsonian Latino Center teamed up with the National Museum of the American Indian to celebrate the rich cultural heritage represented in the celebration of Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead. In this segment, the local Mixteca culture organization, Grupo Los Tecuanes, perform the traditional dance, Danza de los Tecuanes - Dance of the Jaguar, for the museum's annual Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos celebration. This is the first of two performances of the dance performed on the second day of the festival. The program was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on October 30, 2016.

The Great Inka Empire: The Meaning of Qorikancha

National Museum of the American Indian
Dr. Jorge Flores Ochoa, Faculty of Anthropology, Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad, Cusco, talks about the meaning of Qoricancha, an open space, or kancha in Quechua, where a garden was created from sculptures made of silver and gold. The Quechua word for gold is qori. Produced for the exhibition "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire" (http://americanindian.si.edu/inkaroad/), on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., through June 1, 2018.

Hawaiian Cultural Festival 2015: Halau Nohona Hawai`i 2

National Museum of the American Indian
This year's theme for our annual Hawaiian Cultural Festival is The Epic Journey of Pele and Hi'iaka. In this segment Halau Nohona Hawai`i treat us to their second performance of Hawaiian music and hula. Halau Nohona Hawai`i is non-profit Hawaiian cultural school located in Silver Spring, MD, dedicated to enriching and making a positive impact on local Hawaiian communities by sharing the spirit of aloha. This performance was webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on May 17, 2015.

Cherokee Days 2017 - Traditional Animal Dances

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fourth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this segment, the Tsa-La-Gi Group of the Eastern Band of Cherokee demonstrate some traditional animal dances of the Cherokee. This performance was webcast live and recorded on April 1, 2017 in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Rasmuson Theater Celebration Featuring Pamyua

National Museum of the American Indian
In celebration of 15 years of presentations by outstanding Native (and non-Native) thinkers and performers in the museum’s beautiful Rasmuson Theater, the Yup'ik music and dance group Pamyua perform. Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian introduces the evening event, the re-dedication of the Elmer and Mary Louise Rasmuson Theater. Also, to celebrate the newly refurbished theater, Roy Agloinga, Rasmuson Foundation Program Officer and senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska give some remarks. Brothers Stephen and Phillip Blanchett, of Yup’ik and African American descent, formed Pamyua in 1995, with traditional Yup’ik dancer and culture bearer Ossie Kairaiuak joining them in 1996. Revered across Europe and North America, Pamyua brings a unique style and contemporary twist to Yup’ik drum-dance songs. Experience the group’s special cultural harmony and learn more about Inuit culture through this celebration of one of the great cultural arts venues on the National Mall. This program was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 7, 2019.

Día de los Muertos Festival 2015 - Artist Talk by Carmen Lomas Garza 1

National Museum of the American Indian
San Francisco Chicana artist, Carmen Lomas Garza, gives a talk on Mexican American culture and growing up in Kingsville, Texas, as they are illustrated in her art. She also talks about of Día de los Muertos in connection with offrenda and papel picado works. She also discusses the discrimination she has encountered throughout her life as a Mexican American, especially in her early encounter as a student teacher. This is the first of two talks she gave as part of the Día de los Muertos Festival, and was recorded and webcast from the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on October 31, 2015.

Native/American Fashion 11 | Lynette Nylander

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the third panelist to speak on the topic Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, writer, editor, and creative consultant Lynette Nylander. Her talk is titled Cultural Appropriation or Appreciation? A Modern-Day Critique. Lynette Nylander is a writer, editor, and creative consultant living in London. Recently named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 Europe list, she previously held the position of deputy editor of prestigious style bible i-D ; she continues to contribute to both i-D and the biannual Industrie magazine. She regularly contributes to Elle UK, The Guardian, and Refinery29, and has spoken at the British Film Institute and the Victoria and Albert Museum on race, gender, and pop culture. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

The 111th Material Culture Forum: Julia Blakely

National Museum of the American Indian
The 111th Material Culture Forum's topic is "The Art and Science of Celestial Navigation Across the Smithsonian Universe." In this segment, Julia Blakely, Rare Book Catalog Librarian, Smithsonian Libraries, speaks on "Navigating by the Book." Julia has undergraduate and master’s degrees in art history from the George Washington University and a M.S., with a specialization in rare books, from Columbia University. She has a long association with Rare Book School at the University of Virginia. Julia has worked with several private collectors. She sails out of the West River on the Chesapeake Bay where she has never used celestial navigation. Since 1988, the Smithsonian Institution Material Culture Forum has been organizing quarterly meetings that offer staff with opportunities to interact with their colleagues in other disciplines, to share information about their fields, to think about different directions in their research, to develop new collaborative projects, or, to just learn. The Forum considers topics from the vast world of objects that the Smithsonian collects, preserves, studies, and presents. The Forum is welcome to all, including members of the outside academic community. This meeting was recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on February 27, 2019.

A Promise Kept: 1 – Opening with Kevin Gover, Joy Harjo, and Gabrielle Tayac

National Museum of the American Indian
Influential policy advocate, writer, curator, and 2014 recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee) is recognized for a lifetime of achievement in this symposium, “A Promise Kept: The Inspiring Life and Works of Suzan Shown Harjo.” A founding trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian, Harjo’s legacy of activism and artistic accomplishment continues to inspire Native Nations and people and influence U.S. policies about Native sovereignty and cultures. In this segment, National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover introduces Joy Harjo, who shares a poem for the occasion. After brief comments, Gover then introduces the symposium moderator, Gabrielle Tayac. Joy Harjo (Muscogee Creek) was appointed the 23rd United States poet laureate in June 2019, and is the first Native American person to be selected for the role. The recipient of numerous awards, Harjo is a poet, musician, and playwright. The author of numerous books of poetry, including She Had Some Horses, In Mad Love and War, Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings, How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems, and most recently, American Sunrise, she has also written a memoir, Crazy Brave, and literature for children and young adults. She has taught at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Tennessee. A noted musician, Harjo has performed with her saxophone nationally and internationally, solo and with her band, the Arrow Dynamics. Gabrielle Tayac (Piscataway) is a Smithsonian Research Associate. An activist scholar committed to empowering Indigenous perspectives, Tayac’s scholarly research focuses on hemispheric American Indian identity, multiracialism, Indigenous religions, and social movements, maintaining a regional specialization in the Chesapeake Bay. She served on NMAI's staff for 18 years as an educator, historian, and curator. She engages deeply in community relationships and public discourse. She just returned from a two year journey to uplift the voices of Indigenous elder women leaders, sponsored by Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors. Tayac earned her Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from Harvard University, and her B.S. in Social Work and American Indian Studies from Cornell University. The symposium was webcast and recorded in the National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater on September 20, 2019.

Jazz Masterworks Trio

National Museum of the American Indian
Enjoy contemporary and classic jazz music performed by the Smithsonian's Jazz Masterworks Trio. Tony Nalker (Piano) has served since 1989 as the pianist of the U.S. Army Blues and currently the group's enlisted leader. Tony is a member of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra, serving as their pianist since 2005. He is also the pianist for Hal Leonard Publishing Jazz Play-Along series which now has over 130 books/CDs in their collection. He received his undergraduate degree in music at James Madison University and M.A. in music from the University of Iowa. James King (Bass) studied at Texas Southern University, Hampton University and the University of the District of Columbia. Mr King has lived and worked in the Washington, D.C. area since 1977. During a musical career that spans more than 25 years, Mr. King, in addition to leading his own groups, has performed with Stanley Turrine, Buck Hill, Elvin Jones, Marlena Shaw, and Ronnie Wells, among others. He has appeared at major jazz festivals in North America and abroad, including North Sea, Montreal, and Pori. Mr. King regularly appears on the Kennedy Center Millennium Stage as part of the December Christmas Day Jazz Jam, and K.C. Jazz Club. Ken Kimery (Drums and Executive Producer) relocated to Washington, D.C. in 1993, where he was invited by Dr. Anthony Brown to become a member of the National Museum of American History's Jazz Program. First in the capacity of assistant program coordinator for the Jazz Oral History Program, then in 1994 as acting producer for the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra, producing its 1994 Washington, D.C. concert season and national tour. Then in 2005, Mr. Kimery was promoted to executive producer taking the orchestra in 2008 on a historic tour to Egypt, Russia in 2011 and Ethiopia in 2012. This performance took place on January 20, 2013 as part of the Out of Many multicultural festival of music, dance, and story.

Sand Creek Massacre: 10 Multigenerational Impacts - Tom Meier

National Museum of the American Indian
Sand Creek Massacre: 150 Year Remembrance, jointly sponsored by the National Park Service and the National Museum of the American Indian, is a one day symposium that commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Sand Creek Massacre - a tragedy that occurred on November 29,1864. In this segment, Tom Meier speaks on "Specific Actions Taken by Various Groups and Government to Foster a Better Understanding of the Multigenerational Impacts of the Sand Creek Massacre." Tom has photographed the Sand Creek Massacre site in 1978, and subsequently concentrated his studies on the history of the Arapaho Tribe in Colorado. In 1985, he met Eugene J. Ridgely, Sr., a Northern Arapaho leader, and began to work with the Ridgely family and other tribal leaders on various projects in Colorado. Since 1993, these projects focused increasingly on the Sand Creek Massacre. In 1999, Meier began to photograph the Sand Creek Massacre Spiritual Healing Runs in which Northern Arapaho runners participated, and in 1996, 2001, 2002, and 2009, worked with tribal leaders in coordinating the Northern Arapaho "Coming Home" commemorations in Boulder. Meier is a retired President and Director of the Boulder Historical Society and Museum, and a Charter Member of NMAI.

Nation to Nation: 04 Robert N. Clinton

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, and the notable book of the same title that accompanies the exhibition. In this segment, Robert N. Clinton speaks on "Treaties with Native Nations: Iconic Historical Records or Modern Necessity?" Robert N. Clinton is the Foundation Professor of Law at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University (ASU) and an affiliated faculty member of the ASU American Indian Studies Program. He is also a faculty fellow at the Center for Law, Science and Innovation. He has served on the courts of several tribes in addition to teaching and writing about tribal law, Native American history, federal courts, cyberspace law, copyright, and civil procedure. His publications include numerous articles on federal Indian law and policy, constitutional law, and federal jurisdiction. This symposium was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18. 2014.

Design of the National Native American Veterans Memorial

National Museum of the American Indian
New drawings show the setting for the memorial to Native American veterans to be built on the grounds of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. The perspective moves from the museum's Welcome Plaza down the approach path to the memorial itself. The last drawing shows the standing ring of the memorial as it will be seen from the southeast corner of the National Mall, between the U.S. Capitol and the museum. Design by Harvey Pratt/Butzer Architects and Urbanism, illustration by Skyline Ink, courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian
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