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Found 2,012 Collections

 

Seeing Double: Two Portraits, One Subject

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Jazz. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they wonder, and what is similar and different. Families can also explore the history of each of these people. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
43
 

Seeking equality: A brief history of the American women's fight for political rights

This learning lab provides the preface and context for an in-class SAAM presentation on the ideology of republican motherhood as it influenced women during the years 1770 to 1920.  This lesson seeks to answer two questions:

  • To what extent did American women embrace the ideology presented by  republican motherhood?
  • In what ways and to what extent did women find the ideology to be confining, and thus, challenge it?

Preparing for the lesson:

The night before the first lesson, students will:

  • Study the document Women’s Suffrage Postcard and respond to the Claim-Support-Question activity built into the document. Look for the paper clip icon in the upper left hand corner.
  • Read the article: How women’s history and civil rights came to the Smithsonian; be sure to read my annotation attached via the paper clip icon.
  • Watch Dr. Berkin’s short presentation on republican motherhood; craft your own definition of republican motherhood and post it in the text entry box under the paper clip icon.

Day 1 – Jigsaw Activity


The class will break into 4 groups, each becoming an expert on a particular aspect and era in which the women’s rights movement made strides. As you study the listed resources, on the note taking worksheet, record the ways women embodied the principles of republican motherhood. Additionally, note the ways in which they challenged this philosophy.

Once each group has completed their research, students will break into jigsaw groups through which they will share the resources they studied and their analysis of these resources. 

Day 2 – Video Conference with SAAM

Using artworks presented by  the Smithsonian American Art Museum and in conversation with a SAAM curator, students will analyze artworks from each era to extend their understanding of the ways through which women both accepted and challenged the ideology of republican motherhood.

Concluding activities (day 2 HW):

  • Study the Women’s Suffrage photograph and respond to the Claim-Support-Question activity built into the document. Look for the paper clip icon in the upper left hand corner.
  • Read the article Women in World War I and the Time Magazine article How World War I helped women gain the right to vote; watch the two video excepts embedded in the Time article from PBS’s The Great War.
  • Study the photo / painting The Emancipation of Women, and synthesizing all of your knowledge, respond to the Claim-Support-Question activity built into the document. Look for the paper clip icon in the upper left hand corner.
Jill Stedman
21
 

Segregation

This gallery shows artifacts, photographs, and paintings that depict the Jim Crow South.

Michelle Moses
6
 

Segregation, Integration, and the Civil Rights Movements in Baseball and the United States Postal Service

Issues of racial inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining the complicated and problematic history of segregation, integration, and the Civil Rights Movement with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. In the classroom, these artifacts, articles, and videos can be used to explore the common and diverging ways that segregation manifested itself in Major League Baseball and the Postal Service. Students will also be able to explore how individuals in both institutions combatted this segregation through movements for integration and, beyond that, a broader expansion of opportunity for African-American individuals in these institutions. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze the thematic significance of artistic depictions of African-American and white ballplayers and, more specifically, what these depictions communicated about these two racial groups and their place in the sport of baseball. Supporting questions and further ideas for classroom application can be found in the "Notes to Other Users" section.



National Postal Museum
31
 

Segregation, Integration, Desegregation

This is a collection of primary sources related to the them of segregation, integration, and desegregation.  This includes sources about Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas (1957-1958), and the desegregation of Boston Public Schools.

#SAAMteach

Jacob Montwieler
16
 

Selma and A March for Freedom

Sunday morning, March 7, 1965, several hundred protesters gathered in Selma, Alabama planning to march to Montgomery in the hopes of obtaining federal protection for a voting rights statute. 


Key terms:

Civil Rights

Civil Rights Movement

Tanis Ockwell
5
 

SENSES SERIES

Aggregate of Learning Lab collections about the Smithsonian collaboration with the Science for Monks and Nuns Program - senses and sensory perception.

Tracie Spinale
11
 

Senses Series - Smell

How do we experience the sense of smell? This collection explores the variety of human and animal smell experiences. Videos examine ants that use smell to communicate, orchid bee perfumery, and the unique smell adaptation of the maned wolf. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides the structure and function of the nose, as well as olfaction experiments. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from a Tibetan monastic Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of smell differ from your own?

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
9
 

Senses Series - Taste

How do we taste what we taste? This collection is about the kinds of tastes that the human tongue experiences. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the tongue and taste function. Included are experiments to try, as well as examples of the kinds of tastes: sweet, salty, sour, hot and bitter. The collection closes with a cross-cultural examination of tongue function and tastes from Tibetan monastics—who recognize thirty-six different tastes!

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
14
 

Senses Series - Touch

How do we experience the sense of touch? This collection explores the variety of human and animal touch experiences. From the characteristics of a variety of objects, to a video which examines the touch experience of tortoises and pandas... we all experience touch differently. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides touch experiments; an examination of pain and why it hurts, and the functionality of the body's largest organ—the skin. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from Tibetan monks' Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of touch differ from your own?

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
19
 

September 11, 2001

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Battered bronze sphere returns to World Trade Center site. Use these resources to ask, where is 9/11 lie in our national memory? Is it recent event, or history?

Kelly Wall
57
 

September 11/National Day of Service and Remembrance: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Battered bronze sphere returns to World Trade Center site. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
55
 

Seven Natural Wonders of the World: and the men who conquered them.

This collection contains images and videos of the seven natural wonders of the world, along with the men who conquered them through expedition and discovery.
Linda Muller
26
 

Sewing Gut videos

The art of sewing sea mammal intestine – also called gut – is an ancient and practical one used to create water-repellant clothing and bags, as well as ceremonial garments. During a week-long residency organized by the Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in 2014, Alaska Native artists Mary Tunuchuk (Yup’ik), Elaine Kingeekuk (St. Lawrence Island Yupik) and Sonya Kelliher-Combs (Iñupiaq-Athabascan) studied historic gutskin objects and demonstrated how to process and sew gut to students, museum conservators and visitors. A two-day community workshop in Bethel followed, taught by Mary Tunuchuk and hosted by the Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center with assistance from Director Eva Malvich.

The video set presented here introduces the artists, examine historic objects made with gut from the Smithsonian collections, and offers detailed explanations and demonstrations. Learn how to process and sew sea mammal intestine (and hog gut as an alternative material for non-Alaska Natives); prepare grass and tapered thread for sewing; and complete a gut basket or gut window project. Links to a selection of Iñupiaq, St. Lawrence Island Yupik and Yup’ik objects from the Smithsonian collections made from gut are included below.

Tags: Alaska, Native art, museum, education, Indigenous, sew, gut, intestine, sea mammal, walrus, seal, St. Lawrence Island Yupik, Inupiaq, Iñupiaq, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
19
 

Sewing Salmon videos

The Sewing Salmon project was hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska and brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists: Audrey Armstrong (Koyukon Athabascan), Coral Chernoff (Sugpiaq) and Marlene Nielsen (Yup'ik). Together they learned and taught about creating work from salmon skin through studying historic museum objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. The video set presented here introduces the artists and their techniques. Links to a selection of Alaska Native objects from the Smithsonian collections made from salmon skin are included below.

Tags: Alaska, Native art, museum, education, Indigenous, sew, salmon, fish skin, Athabascan, Sugpiaq, Alutiiq, Yup'ik, Iñupiaq, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
15
 

Shapes

Exploring shapes with preschoolers

Alix Fitzpatrick
18
 

Shaping America: Early America to the Civil War Portraits

Meet the politicians, reformers, inventors, authors, soldiers and others who shaped the course of American history from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. Students will analyze portraits to learn about the diverse and significant contributions to American society made by individuals in the Portrait Gallery’s collection.

#NPGteach

Miranda Daniels
25
 

Shaping America: Exploring Portraiture from the Colonial Era to the Civil War

Meet the politicians, reformers, inventors, authors, soldiers, and others who shaped the course of American history from the Colonial Era through the Civil War. Students will analyze portraits to learn about the diverse and significant contributions to American society made by individuals in the National Portrait Gallery’s collection.

#NPGteach

Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to:

  •  Identify important Americans and analyze their contributions to U.S. History
  • Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what we can learn about the sitter through these components

Keywords: Colonies, Revolutionary War, Westward Expansion, Civil War, Abolition, Suffrage

Nicole Vance
68
 

Sharing the Dena'ina Language

The Alaska Office of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center hosted a seminar with the Dena’ina Language Institute in 2010 at the Anchorage Museum. Elders Helen Dick and Gladys Evanoff shared their knowledge about Dena'ina heritage objects in the Smithsonian collections, using the objects as tools to teach the Dena'ina Athabascan language. They worked with language learners Karen Evanoff, Aaron Leggett and Michelle Ravenmoon and with linguists James Kari and D. Roy Mitchell to script and record new language learning videos, including the three videos presented here. Links to the museum objects discussed are included below. 

Tags: Dena'ina, Athabascan, Indigenous, language, Alaska Native, dog pack, fire bag, snowshoes, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
7
 

Shimomura's

Analyzing Roger Shimomura's painting "Diary 12, 1941" and understanding Japanese American internment

#SAAMteach 

Karen McClinchey
23
 

Shimomura's "Diary 12, 1941​​"

Analyzing Roger Shimomura's painting "Diary 12, 1941" and understanding Japanese American internment

#SAAMteach 

Laura Magno
23
 

Ships Before Mid-Nineteenth Century

This collection represents many types of ships before mid-nineteenth century. These ships presented here represent the types of trades and voyages that occurred during the time period. Ships before 1865 were used for a variety of reasons. Ships were used for battle, whaling, the transport of goods and crops, and the transport of slaves. What ships were used for definitely says a lot about the time period. How the ships were made depicts the innovation at the time. What was transported depicts what was in great demand, for example tobacco and slaves. All the items in the collection ties into how ships were used at the time. Due to the amount of money brought in from ships it is apparent that ships and trades had a big affect on economies.

Daviana Truesdell
10
 

Shoes of the 19th Century

    Shoe trends that we wear today date back to when the United States was at its colonial phase. In this collection, you will see various of styles that of course, throughout time have changed into the trends we see today; although, the foundations of it started at this time period. Evidently not having modern methods to make shoes, they had to be made by hand; therefore, materials used will also be seen in this collection. This stage of colonial United States is important because since then, the fashion and development of shoes have transformed the way we dress our feet nowadays.

Terezy Ochoa
10
 

Shoes: Exploring Culture, History, Place, and Innovation

Teacher's guide for using shoes to explore culture, history, place, and innovation. Includes images of thirty shoes and three different strategies, located at the end of the collection, for using these objects in the classroom. 

Strategies include: a small-group object analysis activity; a poster, "If You Walked in My Shoes," introducing students to basic primary source analysis questions through six pairs of shoes; and a vocabulary exercise for ESL learners.

Tess Porter
33
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