Skip to Content

Found 15,381 Resources

Chesapeake Bay Parasite Project--2017 Citizen Science Newsletter

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
White-fingered mud Crabs (Rhithropanopeus harrissi) are native to the Chesapeake Bay. These scavengers are small, and live in oyster reefs and woody debris in the water. The parasitic barnacle that infects these mud crabs is called Loxothylacus panopaei (Loxo, for short). Loxo infects and castrates the crabs, which means they can no longer reproduce. Scientists are interested in learning where Loxo is in the Chesapeake Bay and how mud crab populations change year to year. Videos by Cosette Larash, Maria Sharova, Alison Cawood Music: Positive by AShamaluev https://www.youtube.com/user/AShamaluev/about

Making Sense Of Climate Change 1: The History and Physical Science of Global Warming

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Get the truth about climate change, with plant scientist Bert Drake of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. In this 6-part series, discover how we got here, how we move forward, and what climate change could mean for our food our coastlines and our homes. Learn more at https://serc.si.edu/making-sense-of-climate-change. Lecture 1: The History and Physical Science of Global Warming Meet the first discoverers of human-induced climate change, and learn how greenhouse gases can cause temperature changes around the globe. Credits: Opening images courtesy of NASA, Chesapeake Bay Program, USAID and the U.S. Department of Energy Music: "Ruckus 3" by Dave Depper From The Free Music Archive Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ Carbon Dioxide pumphandle video by NOAA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vA7tfz3k_9A What's Really Warming the World? by NASA

Blue Crab Cannibalism

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
The Chesapeake Bay's most popular crustacean is also a cannibal. Adult blue crabs frequently prey on juveniles, making meals of the young of their own species. For that reason, young blue crabs rely on seagrasses and other underwater plants to help them hide from hungry adults. Here's what it looks like when a fully grown blue crab cannibalizes a juvenile. Video taken by the Fish and Invertebrate Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. To learn more about the dangers blue crabs face in the Bay, visit http://ecosystemsontheedge.org/top-predator/.

Shark Tagging: Smithsonian Movement of Life Initiative

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
The Movement of Life Initiative is a developing program in animal tracking research conducted by Smithsonian Institution researchers and their colleagues. As part of the program, scientists Matt Ogburn and Charles Bangley at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center are tracking sharks along the East coast of the United States. They’re focusing on four species of sharks: Bull, Blacktip, Dusky, and Smooth Dogfish. These four sharks are regulars in the Chesapeake Bay region and fulfill a variety of ecological roles, but much basic information about their movement ecology within the estuary and beyond is still unknown. Ogburn and Bangley are tracking the sharks using a system called “acoustic telemetry,” equipping the animals with tags that emit a series of pings, which receivers along the Atlantic can pick up. Through acoustic telemetry, the scientists aim to better understand habitat use and migration behavior among these coastal sharks in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region. Learn more about the Movement of Life Initiative: https://movementoflife.si.edu/ https://serc.si.edu/research/projects/coastal-migrations Music by Adam Vitovsky Creative Commons License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Thumbnail Photo: Smooth Dogfish shark by Chuck Bangley

Seahorse Noodling

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Two lined seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, dubbed Mr. Ed and Flicka, perform a courtship dance in their aquarium. Seahorses are generally monogamous, mating with one partner for life. It's common practice for seahorse couples to do a courtship dance every morning, often changing color and intertwining their tails. And when it's time to have children, it's the male who gives birth. During mating, the female deposits hundreds of eggs into the male's brood pouch, where they're sheltered until he gives birth to them about three weeks later. It's thought this may have evolved as a way for the male to be certain he's the father. (Video: Karen McDonald/SERC)

A Bouquet of Protozoa: Zoothamnium from the Patuxent

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
These bell-shaped protozoa, called Zoothamnium, form large colonies connected by a stalk with a high-speed spring inside. Whenever they sense a disturbance, the stalk contracts, drawing the cells into safety, and expands again once the disturbance has passed. SERC marine biologist Tim Mullady captured this microscopic video of Zoothamnium from Maryland's Patuxent River in April. Watch to see the colony branch out like a bouquet of flowers at 0:13, 0:32 and 0:56!

SERC Field Trips: How to Prepare

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Teachers: Want to give your students a taste of outdoor science at the Smithsonian? The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) does research on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay, and hosts hands-on, curriculum-based field trips for students in grades K through 8! In this 5-minute video, learn what SERC does, what to bring, how to dress and what to expect so your class can get the most out of their time doing science on the Bay.

Field Ecology: Leaping from a Mullet Skiff

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
With its motor near the front, the mullet skiff is an oddity. Why place a motor here? It leaves the back open for working an enormous seine net—something ecologists use to trap and study fish in Chesapeake Bay. Here, ecologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center launch a 200-foot seine net along a Chesapeake marsh. First, the boat captain scans the marsh for a suitable spot. A net runner uses ninja-like skills to quietly jump off the stern and secure one end of the net on the shore, while the captain speeds the skiff away, arcing around the marsh. As the skiff arcs back towards shore, the captain cranks the steering wheel and throttles down. The second net runner then jumps off the shore and quickly runs the other end of the net to shore, entrapping the fish. Timing and agility are important skills for the second net runner. Leaping off a moving boat into water that instantly stops your momentum while managing the unwieldy net is no easy feat— envision "walking" an 80-pound Golden Retriever that is determined to chase a squirrel! There have been some epic wipeouts, but all you can do is pop up and run as fast as you can to shore, splashing the entire way to prevent the fish from escaping.

Dinner Time: Crab vs. Clam

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
A blue crab breaks open the shell of a Macoma clam and scoops out the inside. This blue crab lives in a tank at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and is wearing a telemetric "beeper" to let researchers know when it's feeding. The Macoma clam has a thin shell that's incredibly easy to crack. We don't think it ever stood a chance...

Ecosystems on the Edge: Points of Invasion

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Invasive species have a host of ways to infiltrate our shores. Find out how humans have accidentally--or deliberately--brought them over, how scientists are tracking them, and how we can do a better job stopping them in the future. View more Ecosystems on the Edge videos and learn how you can help at http://ecosystems.serc.si.edu. Created by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

Aerial View of the Global Change Research Wetland

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Aerial view of the Global Change Research Wetland at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, taken by Dr. Chuck Gallegos. Also known as the "wetland of the future," the Global Change Research Wetland is trying to predict whether wetlands will survive sea-level rise into the next century. Here, inside open-top chambers, scientists are investigating how plants will grow and build soil in the future by raising CO2 and nitrogen to levels predicted in the year 2100. As the drone camera flies over the marsh, you will see tall clumps of invasive Phragmites, a golden-brown reed taking over the marsh, and the chambers where scientists are tracking their growth under high CO2 and nitrogen (0:35). Further on, you'll see the chambers where they experiment on native marsh plants, raising CO2 and nitrogen to see how the plants respond (0:45). Based at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md., the wetland contains the longest-running field study of its kind in the world. Learn more at http://ecosystemsontheedge.org/wetlands-of-the-future/.

Ballast Water Sampling

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Kim and Jenny from the Smithsonian Environmental Reseach Center collect measurments and plankton samples from a ballast tank. Read more about thier research here http://www.serc.si.edu/labs/marine_invasions/feature_story/January_2013.aspx

Leopard Shark Caught on Sonar

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
You've seen sharks on video, but have you ever seen a shark on sonar? Marine biologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center caught this video of a leopard shark in Richardson Bay in June 2016, on a trip through San Francisco Bay for the MarineGEO project. They deployed their DIDSON camera, which uses sonar to see in especially murky waters. Leopard sharks are about 4 feet long and can live up to 24 years in the wild. They're also extremely productive: A female can give birth to up to 37 pups in a single season. But since pups are independent the minute they're born, she doesn't have to worry about keeping an eye on all her children. (Video: Matt Ogburn/SERC Fish & Invertebrate Ecology Lab)

Seagrass Resilience & Restoration: Smithsonian Bay Optimism Lecture Series

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Unless you've done some exploring, chances are you may have missed an amazing display that unfolds below the surface of the Chesapeake Bay. Despite their inconspicuous nature, underwater plants pack a punch for the health of aquatic ecosystems and protecting shorelines. They provide fish and shellfish habitat, buffer shorelines, and clean the water. In this presentation, University of Maryland ecologists Katia Engelhardt will take you on a tour of underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay, provide an overview of trends, and provide optimism (infused with a dose of caution) for their restoration, recovery and resilience. Part of the 2017 Bay Optimism lecture series at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Opening Music: Dave Szesztay, "The Big Moment" https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ See more Bay Optimism talks at https://serc.si.edu/visit/free-evening-lectures

SERC herring Big Gunpowder River, April 2015

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Every spring, River Herring swim up the tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay to spawn. The Fish and Invertebrate Ecology Lab of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) have been studying the habitat use of river herring. In this video, you can see Alewife swimming around in their spawning grounds of the Big Gunpowder River in Maryland. Alewife and Blueback Herring are the two kinds of river herring that spawn in Chesapeake Bay tributaries. Want to learn more about SERC's herring research? Check out our webpage: http://www.serc.si.edu/labs/fish_invert_ecology/herring.aspx

Dancing on Blue-Green Algae

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Smithsonian ecologist Pat Megonigal dances on a microbial mat in Abu Dhabi. The mat is dominated by cyanobacteria, sometimes referred to by the misleading name "blue-green algae." The Jell-O-like consistency of this particular mat is due to regular flooding the promotes a thick accumulation of microorganisms, which soak up carbon dioxide as they grow.

SERC, DIDSON video, Deer Creek Herring 2015

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Dual-frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) is an imaging sonar technique that is helping the Fish and Invertebrate Ecology Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) count the number of river herring present at spawning locations up the tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Here is a video of a school of Alewife swimming around in Deer Creek. Alewife and Blueback Herring are the two kinds of river herring that spawn in Chesapeake Bay tributaries. What are you seeing in this video? You are essentially looking down on the stream from above. The brightest spots that you see, if you notice, are not moving. Those are rocks on the bottom of the river bed. Each of the moving short bright lines is a fish. The fish moving from right to left are swimming upstream. We know that these fish are Alewife because we caught several and visually identified them at the site. Want to learn more about SERC's herring project? Check out our webpage: http://www.serc.si.edu/labs/fish_invert_ecology/herring.aspx

SERC Choptank herring spawning, May 2014

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Every spring, river herring swim up the tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay to spawn. The Fish and Invertebrate Ecology Lab of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) have been studying the habitat use of river herring. In this video, you can see the splashing caused by spawning activities of Blueback Herring in the Choptank River. Alewife and Blueback Herring are the two kinds of river herring that spawn in Chesapeake Bay tributaries. Want to learn more about SERC's herring research? Check out our webpage: http://www.serc.si.edu/labs/fish_invert_ecology/herring.aspx

SERC heron eating herring at Big Gunpowder River, April 2015

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
We're not the only ones interested in the river herring populations that spawn in the tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay! The Fish and Invertebrate Ecology Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) captured a video of this blue heron attempting to feast upon Alewife at Big Gunpowder River in Maryland. Alewife and Blueback Herring are the two kinds of river herring that spawn in Chesapeake Bay tributaries and are important prey for herons, eagles, ospreys, Striped Bass, and many other bay species. Want to learn more about SERC's herring research? Check out our webpage: http://www.serc.si.edu/labs/fish_invert_ecology/herring.aspx

Get to know Vanessa Ramirez, founder, ​and director of the all-female Mariachi group, Grupo Bella

Smithsonian Latino Center
Find out what inspires musician Vanessa Ramirez and listen to what she thinks it means to be Latinx in the United States.

Get to known Disney-Pixar illustrator Ana Ramirez

Smithsonian Latino Center
Ana Ramirez is an illustrator and functioned as a visual development artist for Coco. Ramirez also had the opportunity to illustrate Miguel and the Grand Harmony, a book inspired by the award-winning film.

Get to know chef Zarela Martinez

Smithsonian Latino Center
Zarela Martinez gives us a look into a world far different than modern-day America. This experience is what made her who she is and shaped her career as a chef in the United States.

Remembering the 1991 Disturbances in Mt. Pleasant

Smithsonian Latino Center
On May 5, 1991, Washington, D.C.'s historic Mt. Pleasant and Adams Morgan neighborhoods erupted in violence after a confrontation between local police and Latino residents. Three nights of rioting engulfed the area, and four days of curfew ensued. These disturbances mark a controversial and unforgettable chapter in local history. This public conversation revisited Washington in 1991 to describe and understand these events. The panelists and audience reflected on how this episode affected Mt. Pleasant and surrounding neighborhoods and the organization of the local Latino community. Sharon Pratt, mayor of Washington from 1991 to 1995; former chief of police Isaac Fulwood; Smithsonian curator and Mt. Pleasant resident Olivia Cadaval; former head of the Latino Civil Rights Task Force and local resident Pedro Avilés; local poet, activist and Mt. Pleasant resident Marcos Del Fuego; former publisher of La Nación newspaper José Sueiro; and the audience will share their memories and analyses of the disturbances. This program presented in May 2011 was organized by the Smithsonian Latino Center as part of its Latino DC History Project, an initiative to research and exhibit the history of Latinos in Washington and its suburbs. Image courtesy of Rick Reinhard.
14593-14616 of 15,381 Resources