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Found 15,381 Resources

A Basketmaker in Rural Japan

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
"A Basketmaker in Rural Japan" 1994 11 minutes Made for the exhibition A Basketmaker in Rural Japan at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Funding from the Smithsonian Institution Special Exhibition Fund. Video footage donated by UMK Television Miyazaki. "A Basketmaker in Rural Japan" introduces the life work of Hiroshima Kazuo (born 1915), the last professional basketmaker in the mountainous Hinokage region on Japan's island of Kyushu. Viewers can watch Mr. Hiroshima make a creel while listening to his descriptions of his apprenticeship, the role of basketmakers in Japanese rural society, and his feelings about his work. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A Baby Zebra in a River of Crocodiles

Smithsonian Channel
At only seven weeks old, a zebra foal plunges into the murky depths of a river teeming with hungry crocodiles. From: BLOOD RIVER CROSSING http://bit.ly/1lr9rRc

A Baby Capuchin is Caught in the Middle of a Vicious Battle

Smithsonian Channel
A baby capuchin finds himself in the middle of a battlefield, as two adult males clash for supremacy. If he isn’t careful, he could find himself with a serious injury – or worse. From the Series: Into the Wild Colombia: A Capunchin's Tale http://bit.ly/2VzMlEU

A 9/11 First Responder Heals Through Art

Smithsonian Channel
Fire officer Brenda Berkman was one of the many first responders during 9/11. Thirteen years later, she's become an artist specializing in stone lithography. Much of her work depicts the evolving cityscape of Downtown Manhattan. From: CROWNING NEW YORK http://bit.ly/1w2atcH

A 66-Year-Old Woman Meets Her Father for the First Time

Smithsonian Channel
At the age of 66, German born Elivra Rypacek meets her birthfather, an African America WWII veteran, for the very first time. From: BREATH OF FREEDOM http://bit.ly/1qT48Sd

A 600-Mile Journey Across Alaska Saves the Town of Nome

Smithsonian Channel
In 1925, an Alaskan adventurer and his trusted Siberian husky completed a grueling 600-mile journey across the frozen plains. Their exploits would end up saving the lives of 2,000 people. From the Series: America in Color: Alaska http://bitly.com/2r4VJDe

A 500-Year-Old Cold Case in the Village of Wharram Percy

Smithsonian Channel
Human remains discovered at Wharram Percy are about to be examined by an expert, in a bid to determine what happened. Is it a medieval murder mystery – or something far more sinister? From the Series: Mystic Britain: The Revenants http://bit.ly/2N58h5N

A 360 View aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower CVN 69

National Air and Space Museum
Take an immersive look behind the scenes as our Smithsonian film crew embarks aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower for F-18 carrier qualifications.

A 30-Day Time Limit for Crash Inspectors

Smithsonian Channel
For the crash investigators of Air Moorea Flight 1121, it came down to a race between the black box's 30-day battery life and the submersible sent to retrieve it. From: AIR DISASTERS: Terror in Paradise http://bit.ly/1Pok2xN

A 1988 Flight From Denver Crashes in Bad Weather

Smithsonian Channel
It's January 19, 1988, and Trans-Colorado Flight 2286 is attempting to land at Durango La Plata Airport. Poor visibility and even worse weather means it is a trickier approach than usual.

A 1941 FBI Raid Reveals a Network of Japanese Spies in LA

Smithsonian Channel
In 1941, Naval Intelligence zero in on a Japanese spy named Itaru Tachibana. Raiding his room at the Olympic Hotel in Los Angeles reveals a stash of documents that outlined the extent of his undercover network. From the Series: America's Hidden Stories: Pearl Harbor Spies https://bit.ly/2UaXBmR

A 18,000-Ton Ship Suspended 33 Feet above the Sea

Smithsonian Channel
The MV Resolution, a self-lifting sea-faring mammoth builds giant wind turbines in the sea. See her six "legs" in action. From: MIGHTY SHIPS: MV Resolution http://bit.ly/1jIHfw6

A 15,000-Ton Luxury Yacht Moved by Mother Nature

Smithsonian Channel
This nautical marvel navigates the seas with seven massive sails and four strong engines. Wind Surf may be fast and maneuverable, but it is also luxurious: 300 passengers travel aboard with 190 crew members at their service. From the Show: MIGHTY SHIPS: Windy Surf http://bitly.com/1C4ELAl

A "Big Man" at the Hirshhorn

Smithsonian Magazine
Ron Mueck's "Big Man" sculpture at the Hirshhorn Museum is a crowd favorite, sparking a wide variety of reactions. Read more at http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/aroundthemall/2009/08/ron-muecks-big-man-is-big/

Tribute to Malcolm X [Black Journal segment]

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm black and white film print is a short documentary made for the National Education Television's Black Journal television program. Editor Madeline Anderson compiled footage of Malcolm X to commemorate the four year anniversary of his assassination.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a), Original 600 foot metal Film Reel (b), and Original 600 foot metal Film Canister (c).

2012.79.1.37.1a: 16mm film. This film opens with footage of the public attending the funeral/wake of Malcolm X, and a voice-over of a male narrator recounts the sentiments of some individuals describing what Malcolm X meant to the African American community during his life and after his assassination. Malcolm X's wife, Betty Shabazz, discusses Malcolm's early childhood roots, family, stints in foster care and boys' homes, and his struggle to stay on the straight and narrow in Boston, MA. The narrator then picks back up describing Malcolm X's biography and attitude towards race relations and integration in America. Excerpts from various television interviews with Malcolm X play. During the first interview clip, Malcolm explains why he believes integration has not been successful and cannot be successful (during that particular point in time) unless certain issues are addressed. In the second interview clip, Malcolm discusses why he was silenced by the Nation of Islam for a comment he made shortly after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He elaborates on what he actually meant by saying that "chickens are coming home to roost" amid an unaddressed climate of hate in the United States. The third interview is with Malcolm after he returned from his pilgrimage to Mecca. American reporters ask him about his feelings on integration in America, now that he has returned from Mecca, where Muslims from all over were participating in the pilgrimage to Mecca together. Malcolm states that his feelings on integration have not changed as a result of the brotherhood he experienced during his trip Mecca. An interview with Betty Shabazz picks up again, and she further explains her late husband's beliefs concerning integration and his wish to redirect the goal of the black struggle from civil rights to human rights by internationalizing the struggle and aligning African Americans with other marginalized groups around the world. Another interview with Malcolm X plays, and he explains, in his own words, how human rights is an international issue that should be addressed by the United Nations. Footage of a civil rights demonstration plays. Malcolm X addresses students in Selma, Alabama and talks about charging the United States with human rights violations. Further, he tells a story in which he defines what he believes to be the difference in mentality between what he calls a "field negro" and a "house negro". He states that he is a "field negro" ready to fight for his freedom.

2012.79.1.37.1b: Original 600 foot film reel.

2012.79.1.37.1c: Original 600 foot film canister. The metal can has two sticker labels, one on each side, with the name of the film and the film distribution company or organization.

The Bronze Buckaroo

National Museum of African American History and Culture
2015.167.4.1ab: 16mm Black and White film.

This film is a roaring round-up of song-studded thrills in this 1938 western featuring an all black cast in a Richard C. Kahn production.

The film is about five cowboys led by Bob Blake that ride from Texas to help their friend, Joe Jackson, who has moved to Arizona for his health. At the Jackson ranch, his sly assistant, Slim Perkins, throws his voice, using ventriloquism to convince foolish "Dusty" that the mule "Gabriel" talks. Bob learns from Joe's sister Betty that Joe disappeared three weeks before and is reminded that her father had vanished in a similar manner and later had turned up dead. The cowboys drift into town to learn what they can. Dusty and a companion enter a saloon, where brutish cowhand Pete shoots his partner in a card game and then forces Dusty to smoke four cigars at once. Bob enters to interrupt the bully and the two have a fistfight. Dusty, who has purchased Gabriel for twelve dollars, is angry that the mule does not talk for him, but finds Slim's book on ventriloquism. Later, Dusty tells Slim that he is teaching Gabriel to recite poetry, then loses his clothes in a crooked poker game with Slim. Bob visits Buck Thorn, a neighbor of the Jacksons' who has offered to buy their ranch, and employs Pete and some other tough cowhands. While riding together, Bob and Betty encounter Uncle, a codger who informs them that he mailed a letter from Joe to Bob a few weeks earlier, a letter he found unstamped and lying on the ground underneath a window of the saloon. Bob enters the saloon, pretending to be drunk. Upstairs, Buck, Pete and their henchmen try to force Joe to sign a deed to his land over to them because it contains a mine worth one million dollars in gold. Bob finds them and pulls a gun but is knocked over the head by the bartender. A shootout breaks out downstairs when his friends come to his rescue. Returning to the ranch, they discover that Betty is gone. She has left to follow Pete, who carries a message that Joe is hurt, and is captured. Buck has Joe branded with a hot iron, and Betty is threatened with the same treatment. Meanwhile, Betty's horse returns to the ranch and Bob and his friends follow the animal's tracks. They are caught by Pete, but escape when Slim throws his voice to make them think others have arrived. During a gunfight among the rocks, the sheriff and his men are led to the scene by Dusty riding Gabriel, and Dusty shoots Pete. Dusty then wins back his clothes and twelve dollars from Slim by using ventriloquism to impersonate Gabriel reciting a satirical poem, while Bob and Betty ride off together.

Sources:

AFI Catalog of Feature Films. Accessed on August 9, 2016 (http://www.afi.com/members/catalog/DetailView.aspx?s=&Movie=2235)

Worldcat. Accessed on August 9, 2016 (http://www.worldcat.org/title/bronze-buckaroo/oclc/30820246&referer=brief_results)

Studs' Place

National Museum of African American History and Culture
16mm black and white kinescope film features a performance by Mahalia Jackson on "Studs' Place," an unscripted television drama that often featured famous people. This episode is a Christmas episode from 1949. It is a prime example of the late-1940s "Chicago School" of television in early broadcast television history.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a), Original 1200 foot Film Reel (b), and Original Film Shipping Box (c).

2014.141.1.1a: 16mm film. This film opens with a shot of store sign that reads "Studs' Place, Fine Eats, Fine Friends, The Place To Meet and Eat." The narrator welcomes the audience and invites them inside to see who is in attendance that night. Inside, a man and woman, Grace, decorate a tree and converse. The phone rings, and Studs Terkel enters the room for a brief moment before leaving to answer the phone. Another man enters the room and offers to add tinsel to the Christmas tree. Eventually, all three men and Grace are standing around the tree talking about the tree and other things. They begin to talk about the one customer who is still in the restaurant and wonder why she's there alone on Christmas Eve. One of the men grabs his guitar and begins to play "Mockingbird," and the young girl walks over to the Christmas tree to talk with them. The man continues to play and the young girl starts to cry. Grace checks in on her to see if she's ok and offers to accompany her to the powder room, so she can talk to her in private. Studs Terkel enters the room again and is briefly happy to learn the young girl is no longer there, before learning she only went to the bathroom. The third gentleman reenters the room, and is aggravated to learn the girl is in fact still there as well. Mahalia Jackson enters in a fur coat and the men are excited to see her. They all sit around the table to talk and catch up. She tells them that she dropped in to try Louie's famous ribs, one of the chefs who is absent on account of it being Christmas Eve. The man who was playing the guitar offers to go fix the ribs in Louie's absence. Studs invites Mahalia to a Christmas party they're all attending later that evening, but she tells them she's very tired from touring so much. Even though she's tired, they convince her to sing. The man gets up and begins playing the piano. Mahalia slowly walks over the piano and sings "Go Tell It On The Mountain." After, they applaud her singing and go check on the ribs being prepared in the kitchen. Grace and the young girl reenter the room, and the woman introduces the young girl as Nancy Nichols. The woman tells Mahalia that Nancy isn't feeling very well, and Mahalia insists that Nancy tell her what's ailing her. Grace leans over to the man and tells him that they can't just leave poor Nancy in this state. A title card that reads "Get In The Scrap" appears as the narrator describes how important scrap dealers are to the nation's defense. The program continues. One of the men inform Mahalia that he accidentally burned the first batch and the second batch will be done very soon. Grace gathers all three men and tells them how Nancy is sad because she is pregnant and her husband is away in the Army. They plot to try to reach her husband for her on the payphone to surprise Nancy on Christmas Eve and cheer her up. Grace explains to Mahalia what they're trying to do for Nancy. One of the men plays the piano for Nancy in an attempt to cheer her up. Nancy tries to leave, but Mahalia convinces her to stay and listen to her sing. Mahalia sings "His Eye Is On The Sparrow." When she finishes, the payphone rings, and it's Nancy's husband. She's very excited! Mahalia begins to sing again. When she finishes, Nancy thanks everyone for what they did. They all decide to attend the Christmas party together. The narrator says the show will be right back and talks about another show viewers should check out. The credits play for "Studs' Place."

Terkel's and a young girl who becomes separated from her loved ones on Christmas Eve. Together with Studs and his coterie of players, Mahalia Jackson attempts to cheer up the young woman by singing. It features two musical performances: "Go Tell It On The Mountain" and "His Eyes Are on the Sparrow."

2014.141.1.1b: Original 1200 foot film reel.

2014.141.1.1c: Original cardboard film shipping box. The top of the shipping box has an adhesive shipping label from the American Broadcasting Company addressed to [Miss Mahalia Jackson]. Handwritten on the bottom of the shipping box is [Studs/ Terkel] with a circle drawn around it.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 9

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original metal film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the ninth in a collection of nine films.

On the outside center of the metal can is a yellow label for Safety Film produced by the Agfa Ansco Corporation. Handwritten on the label in black ink is the inscription [S.S. Jones - Reel - OK]. Handwritten on a white adhesive label is [Funerals - KNIGHTS / JONES OKL].

The film begins with brief footage of men walking beside a passenger train. The next scene shows men coming out of a house and carrying a casket. Two men stand at the bottom of the stairs with poles lifted in the air and crossing. There is a funeral procession with a band playing instruments on the way to the church. The band is followed by the hearse and a long line of cars. People line the street as the procession passes by. The camera shows the interior of the church, and then shows women carrying flowers out of the church followed by other funeral attendees and the pallbearers carrying the casket. There is another procession to the cemetery. The footage shows the graveside service and the casket being lowered into the ground. The next scene shows men standing outside of a storefront talking and laughing. They cross the street. The next scene shows a hearse drive by and a funeral procession. The funeral procession proceeds down a street with people and cars. There are also horses pulling carriages and wagons with people in them.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 8

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original metal film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the eighth in a collection of nine films.

On the outside of the metal can, handwritten in red ink is [#8] underlined twice, and the '8' is written over in black ink; opposite, also in red ink, is [15]. Handwritten in black ink on a white adhesive label in the center of the can is [Oklahoma Jones].

The film begins with men and women walking down the front stairs of a building. The same men and women are shown in a procession down the road wearing Masonic scarves and aprons. The camera shows the men and women standing in front of the building and also a wider angle view of the entire exterior of the building. There are also about half a dozen cars in front of the building. The next scene shows a motorcade with cars and motorcycles driving down a street. Some of the men on motorcycles appear to have on police officer uniforms. The next scene shows people at a racetrack watching jockeys and horses race. The next scene shows men and women walking out of the front door of a building and passing the camera. The men and women then stand in a semicircle and pose for the camera. The camera pans the crowd, and then they all wave to the camera. The next scene is on a farm. A woman feeds chickens, a man stands nearby with a horse, and another man plays with a pig. There is a brief scene of a woman in a carriage and on a horse. The next scene shows a family get into a car and drive away. There is a brief scene of two men racing, one is dressed in running clothes and the other in semi-formal clothes. In the next scene, a family comes out of a house, acknowledges the camera, and then goes back into the house. There is another scene of a farm that appears to be a different farm than the previous one. There are a lot of pigs in the yard, and a man lets horses out of a barn into the same yard. A car and a truck pass in front of the camera. A woman feeds chickens. There is some brief footage of a gas station and some people greeting one another on front porches at the end of the film.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 7

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original metal film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the seventh in a collection of nine films.

On the outside of the metal can are handwritten inscriptions on three white adhesive labels reading: [Acc Oklahoma Jones], [Kids Playing / Basketball], and [pumping gas / oil]. In the center is a yellowed label reading [O.K. / Rev. S S Jones / Reel reel - Red / Needs a leader.] on top of an impinted design.

The film begins with footage from a gas station. The camera pans around the intersection in a commercial district with cars passing by in front of the camera. The next scene shows a man and a woman come out of a house and get into a car. Then the man and woman are seen in a field with cows. Then there is footage of two men in a cotton field. The woman is shown feeding chickens. The exteriors of two buildings are shown, and one of them is possibly the Grand Lodge of the Knights and Pythias. The next scene returns to the farm and a man working with horses and a woman taking care of some plants on the porch. Then a group of people walk out of the house and to a car in the front yard. At another house, a woman feeds the chickens and the camera shows a portrait of the family on the porch before they walk past the camera. Ducks walk around in the front yard. The footage shows people walking around in the yard. The next scene shows women exiting a building. After the women exit, men exit through the same door. There are also some children. The next scene appears to show those same people standing in a line as the camera pans and shows the group. There is a quick scene of children playing followed by young adult men and women walking down the steps after exiting the front door of a building. After a group of adults, possibly teachers, poses on the front steps and walks down, a large group of children walk out of the door and down the stairs. Following the children are more young adults. The next scene shows some of the students in the front of the school performing choreographed exercises and dances. The next scene is in a rural area with a building and an oil derrick. In the next scene, a man walks out of his house and is handed stacks of paper, perhaps money. The next scene shows four people standing on the front porch of a house before they walk down the front stairs. There are some other residential street scenes, and then footage of activity at a gas station. The next scene shows adults and children on the front porch of a house, and then the footage shows the exterior of the Eaglewing Hotel. The next scene shows the window sign for the State of Oklahoma Knights of Pythias Grand Lodge. The camera pans the exterior of the building, and a man comes out of a door and walks down the stairs to the sidewalk. The next footage shows a house and then a storefront. The next scene shows men working on a car, and then there is another scene at a gas station. The camera shows a Use Magnolia Gasoline and Magnolene Motor Oils and Greases advertisement painted on the side of the gas station building. The next scene shows a large house with a little girl playing outside. Then a man comes up to the porch and three women come out from inside. The next scene shows a farm and a woman feeding chickens. There is also footage of horses pulling equipment. The next scene shows a building with a long staircase and people coming outside to pose for a large group portrait. The footage includes the photographer setting up the camera. The crowd begins waving their hands and hats in the air as the film ends.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 6

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original plastic film reel (b) and original metal can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the sixth in a collection of nine films.

Inscribed on the outside of the canister in is [#6] in red and black ink and [S.S. Jones (illegible)] in black ink. Handwritten inscriptions on three white adhesive labels read: [Okla - Jones], [Mme C J Walker / class], and [Summit Parade / 6]. Remnants of a green label with black text are in ther center of an imprinted design.

The film begins with a procession of people dressed in semi-formal clothing walking by the camera before entering what appears to be a brick church building. The next scene shows men exiting a storefront with a Simmons Drug Store sign in the window. A title sign reads Mme C. J. Walker Graduating Class 1927 & Agents By Mme Dora Stephen of Muskogee, Oklahoma. The camera pans over a large group of women from the beauty school dressed in white seated with a man and woman in the center of the group not dressed in white. The crowd moves around and then walks up the front stairs of the building and enters the front door. The next title sign reads South Muskogee District Fair Parade & Board Summit September 17, 1926, L. W. Thomas Manager & J. I. Jones, S. M. Winston, A. C. Calloway. The footage shows a parade of cars in a parade and many of the cars are decorated with streamers. The cars pass in front of the camera. There are also horses pulling decorated wagons. The next scene shows a group of men standing on the stairs in front of a building and the camera pans in front of the building after then men walk down the stairs. The next title sign reads Rentiesville, Oklahoma, Free Fair & Board, W. A. Roberson, S. H. D., A. L. Morris, H. Hill, Professor A. G. McKeney, L. W. Prestly Co. 1926. The footage shows men in a marching band playing instruments and walking out of the front door of Rentiesville High School. A group of men and women follow the band out of the front door and walk by the camera. The camera pans across the front of the building and show the crowd in front. The next scene shows the interior of a business that appears to be a bakery. The scene shows a man and a woman get into a car and then exit the car. The next title sign reads Hugh Vocational Department Professor Prestley And B. T. Roberson, Rentiesville, Oklahoma, 1926. The footage is from an elevated position and shows cars with decoration and horses passing in front of the camera. The horses are being ridden by riders as well as pulling wagons. The next scene shows the exterior of the Home Undertaking Company building. There is also a sign hanging on the outside of the building that says Idlewild Rooms. The next title sign reads One Of Walker's Up Town Buildings in Muskogee, Oklahoma, September 17, 1926. A family walks down the front stairs and out to a building in the backyard and then returns to the house. The family also stands for a portrait. The next scene is filmed from a moving vehicle, probably a train, and shows a body of water and the coastline. Ships are visible in the distance and a road runs parallel to the tracks and cars can be seen driving on the road. There a brief shot from the back of train showing the train tracks and then the camera returns to the side window of the train.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 5

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original plastic film reel (b) and original plastic film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the fourth in a collection of nine films.

Inscribed on the outside of the canister in is [#] in red ink and [5] in black ink. A handwritten inscription on a white adhesive label reads: [Okmulgee, Okla - Wealthy Black Fam / Oil well / Farm].

The film begins with a man and a woman walking up the front porch of a house. The next scene shows the exterior of a house, probably the same one shown at the beginning of the film. The next shows men and women walking out of the door of a building, probably a church, and down the stairs. Many of the men and women are wearing hats. Two men stand on either side of the doorway while the people walk by. This footage continues for about four minutes. A title sign with Deacon and Mrs. M. C. Brown's First Farm Home appears in the next scene, and then the footage shows the Browns and various buildings and their fields. The next title sign reads At Their Daily Occupation. The footage shows horses pulling a man, probably Deacon Brown, on a plow, then a woman, probably Mrs. Brown, coming out to give the man something to drink. There is some brief footage of a group of children. The next title sign reads Their Second Farm Home. A man comes out to feed the horses, and there are also chickens in the footage. Chickens are being fed in front of the house in the next scene. Another title sign reads Their First Oil Well 2,000 Barrels Daily. A man and two women walk beneath an oil derrick. The footage shows a field with other oil derricks at various places on the landscape. A man holds another title sign that reads Their Second Oil Well 3,000 Barrels Daily. The footage shows the oil derrick then many others on the landscape along with houses. The next scene shows several people get into a car and drive away from the camera. Another title sign reads The Public School On Mr. & Mrs. Brown's Farm Near Okmulgee, Oklahoma. The footage shows children in front of a school building. The next title sign reads Their Present Home 908 E. 3rd St. Okmulgee, Oklahoma. The footage shows a car drive up to the house and the Jones get out and walk up to the front door. The next title sign reads Dunbar High School In Action Prof. W. H. Fort Principal Okmulgee, Oklahoma. Children of various ages are shown dancing and playing in the schoolyard. Another scene shows boys and then girls doing calisthenics. The next scenes shows girls playing basketball followed by boys playing football. Girls are shown doing calisthenics. The next scene shows men and women exiting a building, perhaps the school. The next scene shows a group of men standing in front of a brick church building, and the final scene briefly shows the exterior of a house.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 4

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original plastic film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the fourth in a collection of nine films.

Inscribed on the outside of the canister in black ink is [#4 / See List]. Handwritten inscriptions on three white adhesive labels read: [Naomi's Father Pictures / Jones], [Country Baptism 4], and [Big City - Dallas? / STC RES], partially illegible. On the center of the can are remnants of a green and white label on top of an imprinted design.

The film begins with shots of portraits of two young men. The next scene shows a street with houses and a smoke stack in the background. A sign in a window advertises a large group baptism and moving picture, perhaps meaning that S.S. Jones will be filming the baptism. The next scene shows a long procession of the people who will be attending and participating in the baptism. Those that will be baptized are wearing white clothing. The scene after the procession shows a church and some men in uniform standing in a line in the street. There is more footage of a different church in a rural area. There is another processing from the door of the church with those attending and participating in the baptism. Similar to the earlier procession, the crowd walks directly in front of the camera. The next scene shows the people standing on the shore of a small pond. Those that are to be baptized are led out into the water and are baptized by one of the three priests standing in the water. The footage then shows a commercial storefront of a grocery and meat market and store employees bringing products out in front of the store. The footage includes storefronts, signs, and employees for several other businesses: real estate, undertaker and embalmer, barber shop, laundry, and a delicatessen. The next scene shows people leaving a church after a funeral service. The casket is carried out followed by a large crowd from the church. The footage of the funeral includes the graveside service and the casket being lowered into the ground. The last scene briefly shows a large house with a stone wall.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 3

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original metal film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the third in a collection of nine films.

Inscribed on the outside of the canister is, in red ink [#], followed in black ink by [3]. A handwritten inscription on white adhesive label reads: [Boley 1st Natl Bank]. Stamped into the center of the can is the imprint of a logo with stylized letters [EKC].

The film opens with members of the local Masonic lodge walking in a parade down the main commercial street, probably in Boley, Oklahoma. The men are well-dressed and wearing different kinds of hats. The next scene shows men and women leaving what appears to be the front door of a movie theater. They are all dressed in semi-formal clothes. A group of similarly dressed men and women are shown leaving the front door of a building in the next scene. They then pose in the front yard for a group portrait. The next scene shows the First National Bank in Boley, Oklahoma, and a title sign for the scene notes that it was the first bank organized by blacks in America. Men are shown walking out of the front door of the bank and the camera pans to show the front window with the name of the bank on it. There is also a wider shot of the entire bank building. The next title sign states that the footage shows the M.M. Mathonican General Merchandise store, also in Boley. A man and a woman walk out of the front door of the store and then back inside, presumably they are Mr. and Mrs. Mathonican. The next title sign indicates that the footage shows Reverend C. Johnson and his wife's farm and home in Boley. They walk off of the front porch and into the yard. The next title sign notes that the footage shows the Moder Order of Pals Boy Scouts of Oklahoma City at the Boley Fair Grounds. The footage shows tents and other structures at the campground and boys dressed up in scout uniforms marching around the campground. A title sign gives the exact date of the next scene, July 8, 1925, and it is at the Boley Telephone Company owned by M. T. Hunter and his son L. C. Hunter. The footage shoes a woman seated at a telephone exchange board and two other women stand beside her. There is also footage of the outside of the building. The next title sign notes the footage shows the C. L. White Hardware Company in Boley, again on July 8, 1925. Customers are shown exiting with a variety of goods from the store. The next scene shows a parade down the main commercial street with soldiers in uniform followed by boys in uniform. The footage then shows a variety of street scenes with people and a variety of vehicles. The next scene shows a parade, possibly part of the later funeral procession, down the main commercial street. The men are dressed formally and have small white aprons around their waists. Some of the men are wearing medals on their jackets or vests. As the casket is placed into a wagon, soldiers stand on either side. Then they walk in front of the wagon as it goes down a street followed by vehicles and a large number of people walking that pass in front of the camera. A streetcar is also visible in the background. There is again footage of the casket begin placed in the automobile wagon, possibly after the church service before prior to going to the cemetery.
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