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Found 947 Collections

 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Caminos Teen Leadership Program

CAMINOS is an immersive; one year long paid internship empowering Austin-area Teens to carve their own path in the creative arts. Students work alongside ESB-MACC professionals on a variety of community oriented activities, projects, and exhibitions.

#ethnicstudies

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
13
 

Beauty/Truth/Revealing/and Concealing: Adding complexity to a literary analysis (Wrap up lesson with "A Doll's House," by Henrik Ibsen) #SAAMTeach

While this lesson revolves around Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House," it can be used in conjunction with any work of literature featuring strong characters - the type who generate potentially negative reactions among students, such as: "I hate him... There's nothing good about ______....he's the villain... she's the hero, etc." The lesson is designed to push students out of their comfort zone, give themselves permission to speculate and entertain a variety of viewpoints, and as a means to step away from the literature they just read, then step back in with perhaps a more open-minded approach.

This is a discussion-heavy lesson, requiring some patience on the part of the teacher not to jump in and fill in the gaps. But after completing it the first, second, and then third time, I could definitely sense the students were now more apt to be "risk takers" and more "open minded" with their interpretations and insight.

Step by step instructions follow in the "Notes to Other Users" section. #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
8
 

Design with Empathy (Objects)

This collection includes objects that reflect a design with empathy approach. Explore the objects further on the URLs under the info link.

Jasmine Kassulke
27
 

Exploration of Different Gold Mining Tools and Techniques

Historical images of placer gold mining tools and techniques used in Columbia, CA may be used for learning different placer gold mining techniques. These visual aids may provide a better understanding of how the types of mining tools changed over time. In the early years of the gold rush, miners traveled with very few items; some which included a gold pan, pick and shovel. As more gold was discovered, mining parties established mining camps or tent towns. The cradle or rocker box was used as towns developed. Further development of mining camps brought in the use of long toms, sluice boxes and water diversions created for mining.

columbiastatehistoricpark
7
 

Breaking Barriers: Reconstruction

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, primary source documents, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore the efforts of individuals and groups to overcome racial, economic, and political barriers during the era immediately following the Civil War known as Reconstruction. Resources highlight influential individuals and groups, the intentional and unintentional consequences of actions and policies that resulted in the construction of new barriers for some, and competing perspectives over the best path toward reuniting the United States after the Civil War. The second resource in this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: civil rights, slavery, Freedman’s Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Freedmen Refugees and Abandoned Lands, Fisk Jubilee Singers, African American, Emancipation Proclamation, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Sojourner Truth, South Carolina, Congress, House of Representatives, Frederick Douglass, Robert Smalls, Hiram R. Revels, Benjamin S. Turner , Robert C. De Large, Josiah T. Walls, Jefferson F. Long, Joseph H. Rainey, R. Brown Elliot, Thomas Mundy Peterson, Sidney Taliaferro, John Roy Lynch, Octavius Catto, Edmonia Lewis, Laura Smith Haviland, John W. Menard, Harper’s Weekly, Oliver Otis Howard, William T. Sherman, Howard University, W.E.B. Du Bois, nineteenth century, 19th, Washington, D.C., #NHD

EDSITEment
78
 

Breaking Barriers: United Farm Workers

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how the United Farm Workers, and leaders Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, and Larry Itliong, organized for worker and civil rights during the 1960s and 70s. Resources address how groups and individuals sought to bring attention to the mistreatment of farmers—particularly Chicano and Filipino workers—the barriers they sought to break, and the reforms they fought to establish through artistic expression, as well as organized boycotts and strikes. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: UFW, Latino, Hispanic, California, Fred Ross, art, grapes, lettuce, farmers, immigration, citizenship, labor, laborers, workers, unions, protest, twentieth century, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
66
 

Breaking Barriers: Innovation and Industry

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including, objects, photographs, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how technologies developed in the interest of advancing industrialization during the United States’ Second Industrial Revolution made it possible to overcome economic and social barriers, while, in some cases, unintentionally creating new ones. Innovators who developed technologies and tools to make every day living easier and more enjoyable, along with transportation technologies that broke barriers in terms of travel and movement, are also included in this collection. Users are also asked to consider the legacies of these inventions and their significance to innovation and industrialization through to today. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: factory, industry, invention, innovator, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, Alexander Graham Bell, Samuel F. B. Morse, telegraph, Christopher Latham Sholes, typewriter, telephone, communication, technology, workers, labor, International Ladies Garment Workers Union, David Dubinsky, Asa Philip Randolph, John Llewellyn Lewis, Frances Perkins, Samuel Gompers, strike, boycott, union, Transcontinental, railroad, nineteenth century, 19th, twentieth, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
98
 

Breaking Barriers: Race, Gender, and the U.S. Military

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how individuals overcame barriers during and following their service in the U.S. military. Resources address how issues of race and gender operated as barriers to equal treatment for all those who serve in the U.S. military, as well as circumstances endured by veterans following the end of major wars. The experiences of members of the armed forces during the American Revolution, U.S. Civil War, WWI, and WWII are highlighted; however, other wars and perspectives should be considered when exploring these resources. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: military, soldiers, women, African American, Tuskegee, Airmen, Airwomen, war, World War One, World War I, World War Two, World War II, Red Jacket, Tayadaneega, Joseph Brant, Native Americans, American Indians, Horace Pippin, Theodore Milton Sullivan, J.W. Lucus, Buffalo Soldier, Charles Young, Carter Woodson, Willa Beatrice Brown, Bessie Coleman, Airforce, pilots, Jacqueline Cochran, Janet Harmon Bragg, Cornelia Fort, Nancy Love, WASPs, twentieth century, 20th #NHD

EDSITEment
94
 

Ingenuity Challenge 2019

RebeccaBeakerhead
13
 

Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

Meet the butcher, baker, pizza-dough maker, and all of the friendly people who make our neighborhoods terrific places to live every day. Recycled crafting and interactive songs make this community day the perfect blend of learning and just plain fun.

Discovery Theater
36
 

Tell Me a Story: The Human Imperative for Narrative

In this collection, I am exploring the connections between storytelling and art.  I will also look at the connection of storytelling to neuroscience and the effects of storytelling on the human brain. I will be referencing the work of Will Storr (The Science of Storytelling), neuroscientists, psychologists and resources from institutions such as the Smithsonian, The National Gallery of Art, The British Museum, National Geographic, and the J. Paul Getty Museum.  I will look at how artists use content, meaning, and context to create narrative within their particular medium.

Research suggest that language developed as a way to convey "social information", gossip. Furthermore, it is documented that curiosity kicks the dopamine reward signal in the human brain.  Will Storr in his 2019 book, gorgeously researched and perfectly titled The Science of Storytelling tells us that psychologist Jonathon Haidt says the brain is a 'story processor' not a 'logic processor'.  All of this tells us that humans are hardwired to tell and receive stories.  

How do artists tell stories?  Both Storr and Kidd tell us that psychologist Dr. George Lowenstein asserts there are four ways to induce curiosity in the human brain: questions or puzzles; a sequence of events without revelation of the "end"; "violation of expectations that triggers a search for an explanation"; or knowing that someone else knows something and you want to know it too.  One could almost use these as headings to categorize art and and artistic movements.  Artist capture a moment in time that prods human curiosity, in some cases for thousands of years, to create the rest of the story of that suspended juncture.

The audience for this collection might be students of psychology or English.  It could be of interest to creators of story including novelists, playwrights, actors, screenwriters, musicians, and visual artists.  And anyone interested in what Storr termed as "the science of the human condition".

Will Storr writes, "One benefit of understanding the science of storytelling is that it illuminates the 'whys' behind the 'rules' we're commonly given...Knowing why the rules are the rules means we know how to break them..."

Sources:

Dunbar, Robin et al. Evolutionary Psychology. One World Publications, 2005.

Kidd, Celeste, and Benjamin Y Hayden. “The Psychology and Neuroscience of Curiosity.” Neuron vol. 88,3 (2015): 449-60. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2015.09.010

Storr, Will. The Science of Storytelling. London: William Collins, 2019.


#AHMCFall2019

krambow
33
 

St. Paddy’s Day w/Pete Moss & The Bog Band

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. The Bog Band is a group of young musicians who are “mad” for traditional Irish music and dance. Led by Pete Moss (a/k/a Mitch Fanning), they raise the roof to celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day with live Irish music and throw ion some lively step dancing. Add in a little cultural background and “Sure and it’ll be a rattlin’ good time!”  A Music in our schools Month program.

Discovery Theater
30
 

Heroes at the Freer|Sackler

A view of cultural, disputed and everyday heroes in artworks at the Freer|Sackler Museums in support of our X-day work with 6th grade at Whittle School & Studios, 2019.

Shannon Brinkley
10
 

From Medieval to Modernism: The Impact of Classical Art & Architecture

This collection is intended to further educate viewers on the architecture and art in the Classical period using multiple resources as well as the Robert & DiYanni text, Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities (2012).

Throughout this collection readers will get a glimpse of the start of Classical architecture and how it came to be, how art lined the walls of these buildings and how art through architecture was developed. With that, readers will be able to engage and visualize today's architectural structures and how that culture influences today compared to those between the Medieval times to Modernism. They will also have the ability to recognize the true and inner beauty that lies in this architecture, amidst the chaos that regularly occurred there on a day to day basis. The truth will always remain beautiful even when it doesn't seem that way.

This collection is available for those wanting to see the beginnings of the classical art and it's influences from the medieval times up until modernism and will provide a better visual understanding that before the beauty of what architecture is today, there was once beauty at the start of it all and that remains throughout the years, just presented in different forms. 


#AHMCFall2019

Candi Tate
15
 

Roman Art

The Romans culture included a ton of art. Granted, most of their ideas came from the Greek culture that preceded them. A lot of their art is a play on a Greek original. They dabbled in architecture; building temples, tombs, etc. They built sculptures with materials such as copper and iron. They even had a few writers and poets. This particular collection focuses on the architecture, sculptures and paintings related to their culture. I chose this topic and these segments because I am extremely interested in seeing how art was when it was first coming to fruition, generations ago. It is fascinating to mentally compare it to the art forms we see today. #AHMCFall2019

Britt
18
 

Religion and Architecture

This collection examines how religious architecture became more about art than just a structure. Religion and its associated art and architecture were and have been at the center of every civilization.  While this visual journey begins with religious architecture that is dedicated to many gods or even particular gods, we will see new religions that are dedicated to one God. We will visualize how new religions brought about their own changes within the architecture. This will allow us to visualize how religious architecture has always played a vital role in early civilizations continuing to the world we live in today. 

As we examine these early structures, we can see how some of the themes are the same in different cultures. For example, while the Sumerians utilized more of a solid structure for religion as in the Ziggurat of Ur. The use of the columns and the use of the open space is later used in ancient Egypt, ancient Greece, and ancient Roman architecture. Following each visual of the structures, we will see whom the structure was built and dedicated.  

As we continue our journey, we start to see the development of Monotheistic religions that being with Judaism then to Christianity and then to Islam. All share similar origin stories. We can see the use of columns and space throughout this development. 

Modern times introduces us to more glass covered structures but also structures that take elements of the past and incorporate into modern engineering standards. 



#AHMCFall2019

Markus Vilhjalmsson
27
 

Leaders Throughout History

This collection explores varies leaders through history and why they were so memorable. These leaders will vary from rulers, commanders/captains, artists, and religious beliefs.  Throughout history leaders were treated as great people, who were able to make a stable for themselves through war, adventure, creation, and beliefs. 

One of my interest is looking back a leaders who set a name for themselves and what they have done that made them so known. All leaders from the past and modern time, have their own story and reading through each one of them is interesting to me, as it not only explain what they have done, but also how life was like. 

This collection will focus on why these leaders were so admired and what they have done for the people to view them as leaders through sculptures, architectures,  paintings, and literature. This collection is very interesting and all ages will find this collection very entertain and informative as it explain leaders from the past and modern time, but also around the world.   

#AHMCFall2019

JKimchan
18
 

Comparing Modern Artists Who Were Inspired By The Ancient Arts

This collection dives into the comparison of modern and contemporary artists who were inspired by the ancient arts (prehistoric, ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, etc.) and builds upon the meaning of art and transformation of the different styles. What do these artists have in common? How were they inspired by the ancients?

#AHMCFall2019

Ashley Goerke
23
 

Historic Relevance of Artistic & Innovative Feats

This collection explores historic art, music, culture, philosophy, engineering, and literature. The history of feats among those topics are discussed, as well as how they were relevant to society at the time and today. This collection should appeal to those who have a general interest in composition of any form, whether it'd be an interest in visual art, or something as different as the makeup of a certain philosophy. Tiles can contain many different things, as artistic and innovative feats have existed in every culture, regardless of the time period. Make sure to click the information tab accompanied with each image for descriptions. 

This collection follows a chronological trend starting with Ancient Egypt. The Pyramids of Giza are some of mans greatest constructions, and it's still a mystery as to how ancient man had the capability to construct such feats. Ancient Egyptian music is discussed, as well as how the harp is indigenous to the Egyptians. Ancient Greece is touched upon, especially the modern relevance of the Pythagorean Theorem. Greeks loved the human body, and they had high standards of beauty, which is very similar to today's definition of beauty. The great Roman aqueduct system was the first of its kind, it's interesting to see the initial stages of a sewer system, as you will in this collection. The Roman Empire had its share of graffiti, much of which is similar to modern graffiti, except people used to etch into rocks as opposed to using spray paint.

That's a quick summary of the initial pieces in this collection. There's certainly much more content for you to explore- much of which covers a lot of history up until World War One. Enjoy!

#AHMCFall2019

Brian Kelley
18
 

The Impact of America's Musical Evolution

My curated collection will investigate the non-linear timeline of music and its impact on listeners. I am a firm believer that music does not “improve” with time as it is ever-evolving in new and unique ways. However, I do believe that the additions and discoveries for new styles of music creation to be relative. Music folds over itself. In many aspects of life, not only in music, humans  have built off of past discoveries in order to continue their own research and eventual creation. 

After studying early European music pieces, I have been inspired to further explore musical evolution.  Today's artists have access to all of the music that had been created and recorded. The ability to build upon certain sounds from historic cultures is imperative to what we hear now. While modern artists have better means to effectively produce music, it does not necessarily mean that the quality is superior; they are  simply using preexisting music forms to build their own one-of-a-kind art. The connections I've made are between these ground-breaking moments in music history and what we still hear today.

The audience that this subject should appeal to is the melting pot of America. Music acts as an artistic timeline because it can poetically represent the emotions of the average person in the given demographic. The more that I learn and research of ancient music styles, the more I see a reflection in today's pop music culture.In this collection, I will emphasize the importance to be aware that while different demographics of the world live and experience different physical existences; they experienced the same human emotions. Music helps to prove this idea, giving us the ability to pinpoint the feelings of the past, present and future. 

#AHMCFall2019

Cam Rodriguez
19
 

Fashion

#AHMCFall2019
This collection demonstrates the evolution of fashion in society with an integrated evaluation of femininity and social regard to women throughout  history. Although the defining characteristics of femininity are still not universally identical, the concept originated within ancient history, and was documented in ancient art and through fashion. These investigations and collection are displayed chronologically beginning in 28,000 B.C.E throughout the 21st Century A.D. This collection will expose fashion and its relation to femininity as it began and the social constructs that have impacted its inclusion in art today. 

Fashion is to be regarded as an aesthetic expression through clothing, footwear, lifestyle, accessories, makeup, hairstyle and body exposure. The influence on fashion included war, politics, and social movements and is often connected to cultural movements and social markers, symbols, class and culture. Major fashion reforms came as a result of changing trades and techniques.

Shana Lapre
18
 

Animals in Art

This three part collection is a curation of examples of the relationship between animals and art. Animals were around before the human race appeared and they will probably still be around when we are long gone. Animals have been involved in every civilization whether they are pets or predators. Some see animals as sacred beings- whether it be for religious purposes, or because they are a beloved pet. In modern society, actual animal bodies could be considered art as well. Mounting deer heads, making bear skin rugs, or taxidermy, These forms can also be seen as a way of representing an animal is sacred to them. 

I will be exploring animals in art from Egyptian to modern day in different forms including paintings and sculptures. 

#AHMCFall2019

KAYLA BLAIR
18
 

Influential Architecture: A Comparison of Past & Present

This collection is meant to introduce the viewer to world architecture of the past & present day using Rebold & DiYanni's text, Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities (2012).

One of my hobbies is traveling, and when I do travel, one aspect that I pay attention to is the architecture of the place I'm in. As I was studying architecture for this class, I realized that buildings even in my home state of Ohio had beautiful Roman influences, although they were built two millennia later.

This project will focus on world architecture, its history and innovations, as well as comparisons to the influences we see on buildings going up all around our world today. It should be noted that the artistic comparisons in this collection are of my own observation alone and any influence the modern architects may have had may have been intentional or simply coincidental.

I hope you enjoy this collection.

Resource: Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities by Janetta Rebold Benton & Robert DiYanni. 

 #AHMCFALL2019


Rachel Marshall
20
 

Akhenaton: The Pharaoh, considered heretical, triggered a veritable cultural and religious revolution.

I am here to learn the history through music and culture.  I like the contemporary classic and jazz music because class and jazz music have long histories that represent the cultures at that time and we appreciate and analyze about the emotions of the people in that time.

The purpose of this collection is to show how “The powerful leaders of greatest civilization” who changed the direction of existing Religion, culture, history and art as per their beliefs. This collection is part one of that that I have organized, chronologically, on Akhenaton: The Pharaoh, considered heretical, triggered a veritable cultural and religious revolution. The other two collections are " Alexander the Great: The Greek Conqueror and Cultural blender" and Octavian Augustus: The Roman Emperor "The illustrious one". It is my hope that these collections will help viewers to understand influential power of world’s ancient leaders in the field of Art and Culture.

The works of art is close to some of the spiritual quest and questions the civilizational future. The look of ancient art allows us to develop our ability to look at the world. It leads to searching for the deep meaning of each thing. In every era and every context, art has always been a forerunner of culture and civilization.

My hope is that this collection will exemplify No other, in more than three millennia of ancient Egypt, has left so controversial a trace as Akhenaton. Reigning at the height of Egyptian power, the Pharaoh, considered heretical, triggered a veritable cultural and religious revolution that still fascinates today with its audacity and its mysteries. My main sources of study were Arts and Culture: An Introduction to the Humanities, and the Smithsonian Lab.

It is my hope that these collections will help to understand the pharaoh power and influence over their art. Culture and even religious beliefs

The notion of art includes the creations of the man who express his sensitive point of view of the world, real as well as imaginary, whether through sculptures, linguistic or sound resources. Art is born with a ritual or magic function and has evolved thus becoming aesthetic or even recreational.

Pharaoh Akhenaton takes power in 1353 BC, and breaks with centuries of tradition. During his seventeen years of rule, he imposed new artistic and architectural styles, and celebrated the sun god Aton, at the expense of ancient deities.

The once heavily regulated proportions and artistic poses become more flexible: artisans can create realistic and graceful scenes of the natural world, and even portray Akhenaton and his wife, Nefertiti, in unusual and intimate poses. The royal couple is thus often represented kissing and caressing their daughters. One scene goes as far as figuring the king and the queen preparing to share their bed. The representation of Akhenaton's features seems destined to impress the viewer: massive jaws, drooping lips and stretched eyes of ineffable strangeness.

Forgotten for millennia, Akhenaton was rediscovered only at the end of the nineteenth century, and it will still take several decades to understand its history. He is generally recognized as one of the pioneers of monotheism, long before the "book religions".

#AHMCFall2019

Ju Young Lee
7
121-144 of 947 Collections