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Found 1,997 Collections

 

Destination Moon: EO 10925, Civil Rights, and the Space Program

This collection of resources uses oral histories as well as photographs and articles to explore race relations and the impact of Executive Order 10925 at NASA. Signed by President John F. Kennedy on March 6, 1961, EO 10925 required government contractors to "take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed and that employees are treated during employment without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin."

Resources in this collection -  photographs and articles as well as oral histories - are compiled to supplement the SITES traveling exhibit Destination Moon. This collection is not comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection is closely associated with the "Destination Moon" traveling exhibit. For more information see https://airandspace.si.edu/exh...



Christina Ferwerda
10
 

Angel Island Immigration Station - Two Brides, Two Pathways (Angel Island State Park)

The Angel Island Immigration Station operated as one of the immigrant induction processing centers for the Western United States from 1910 to 1940. The following activities will help learners explore the experiences of the various immigrants that were detained at Angel Island and the process they endured in their attempt to gain access to America.

Upon completing the lesson students will be able to:

  • Interact with photos, maps, and poems from the United States Immigration Station
  • Ask questions and develop the skill of inquiry
  • Introduce the concept of immigration
ranger_casey
26
 

Andrew Jackson

Jonathan Bart's
1
 

Building the Transcontinental Railroad

At our core, we are railroad people. The railroads, for better or worse, shaped the cities in which we live and the spatial relationships between the rural and urban areas of the United States. Railroad language creeps into our vocabulary. We are always getting derailed, or off-track, or, if angry, we are steamed or getting ready to blow our stacks! Our understanding of time and of time zones and our ability to trace the minute shifts of seconds and minutes is a product of being a railroad nation. And, until recently, as one of the largest employers in the United States, many people have a personal family connection to working on the railroads. Railroads started well before 1869, but it was not until that year that the nation was bound together by a transcontinental system. On May 10, 1869, the driving of a golden spike, signaled the ceremonial end to a process that had been going on for years. Two companies, one starting in Omaha and the other in Sacramento competed to lay track. Their reward for each mile was government money and lots of it. By the time that they met at Promontory Point, Utah, vast sums of money and untold human labor and sacrifice had been expended on this incredible human endeavor. A single track united the continent. What used to take months by wagon train, could now be measured in mere days. It changed everything, forever. 

California State Railroad Museum
13
 

Image Analysis: San Francisco Chinatown

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American traditions and culture through resources related to San Francisco's Chinatown. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
10
 

Chinese Gold Miners

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American gold miners. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
4
 

Object Analysis & Compare and Contrast: Asian Steamer

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese-American traditions and culture through resources related to cooking and community. Each artifact, video and image includes open-ended, close-looking questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese-American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
3
 

China's Terracotta Army: Info and Teaching

This collection contains information and teaching resources on the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta figures created for the tomb complex of China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). Resources in this collection cover a wide range of topics, including: the discovery of the Terracotta Army, Emperor Qin Shihuang, the unification of China, Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE) spiritual beliefs, how the terracotta warriors were made, the different types of terracotta warriors, and the types of bronze weaponry found in the Terracotta Army pits. This collection also contains three interactives: a timeline of ancient Chinese history, a map of the tomb complex, and maps of battle formations in the Terracotta Army pits.

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history.  They are some of the greatest tools researchers have to understand the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; religion; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world history; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Shyra Dawson
33
 

America support for the French in World War 2 #TeachingInquiry

This collection focuses on the time when America joined with the Allies to defeat Germany in World War 2. 

My compelling question is: What impact did the arrival of the Americans have in the occupied villages in France in World War 2?

Ros Mattner
8
 

Spanish-American War, Tier 1 Intervention

The Spanish-American War was a conflict between the United States and Spain that ended Spanish colonial rule in the Americas and resulted in the U.S. gaining of territories in the Pacific and Latin America.

The war originated with the Cuban struggle for independence from Spain in 1895. Demand for U.S. help increased after the unexplained sinking of the U.S.S. Maine on February 16, 1898 in Havana Harbour. Newspapers blamed Spain after months of exaggerated news.

The U.S. declared war on Spain in April, 1898 and attacked Spain's interests in the Pacific and Cuba. Realizing that she was outclassed by American military power, Spain surrendered from Cuba in July, 1898 - quickly ending the war. Later that year, in December, 1898, Spain signed the Treaty of Paris in which they gave up their claims to Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Guam and transferred power over the Philippines to the U.S. for $20 million.

Source citation: "Spanish-American War." History.com. A&E Networks. 2016. Web. 6 Jan 2016

Amanda Loyacano
13
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences

This topical collection includes articles and videos about Japanese American experiences in incarceration camps.  The collection highlights four individuals and their stories: Fred Korematsu, a civil rights activist; Minoru Yasui, a lawyer and civil rights advocate; Norman Mineta, a politician who grew up in the camps; and Isamu Noguchi, an artist who self-deported himself to an incarceration camp. Other important articles and videos about inmate experiences are located at the end. This collection is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp LifeJapanese Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other Documents, and Japanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, world war ii, ww2, wwii

#APA2018

Tess Porter
30
 

World War 1 Homefront

Matt Swanson
7
 

U.S. Presidents

Learning about the leaders of the U.S.

Kayla Monson
1
 

US Presidents

The history of the U.S. Presidents

Kayla Perry
6
 

US Presidents

Presidents of the US

Jack Dickinson
3
 

US Presidents

Presidents of the US

Daniela Roach
3
 

US Presidents

Researching US presidents to understand how they affected our past, our present, and our future.

Laura Coors
3
 

U.S. Presidents

All of the U.S. Presidents

Lauren Petersen
3
 

US Presidents

Give me some info about the past Presidents of the US

Reya Jacobsen
7
 

Chinese Wok: Object Analysis

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American traditions and culture through resources related to cooking and community. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
6
 

Salem Witch Trials

The Salem witch trials occurred in Massachusetts during 1692-1693.Hundreds of people were accused of witch craft but just about twenty actually died. Later the Massachusetts colonies admitted the trials were a mistake and compensated the families of those convicted. 

Though this phenomenon has been one of the most well known highlights in history, the theories behind what caused the trials is still plenty. From reasons as small as weather to miscarriages and sickness.

Brianna Burrell
10
 

New world inventions

 Throughout early American history, many great inventions and innovations emerged. With the help of the enlightenment era; development of ideas and critical thinking allowed many talented individuals to create unique and useful products. These items made substantial changes to the everyday lives of american people. Many of them were early examples of similar, more modernized products we still use today.

  I decided to put together this collection of different items that I thought correlated with the fact that they were all first inventions of there kind in the United States. With the country being still very new in the world, it had not really established itself yet as the great world leader it would later become. But, I thought it was interesting to know that early on so many substantial inventions that made historical breakthroughs came from such a very new and underdeveloped country.

JAZMYN Hutcheson
10
 

News Guns that Developed and Evolved in 1845

This was one of biggest years for the development of guns. During this year a French inventor named Louis Nicolas Flobert created four different types of guns to be fired indoors and outdoors. The four different types were Flobert gun, Gallery gun, Saloon gun, and finally the Parlor gun. These guns were made to fit a small bullet for the first time. Most of these guns were developed pretty much the same. There are plenty more guns that were already evolved such as the musket that got developed during this time as well. During this time, many people were using guns for different reasons some just for entertainment and some were being created for other reasons such as war. There were many rifles as well that had evolved, the examples of the rifles are in my collection. The rifles all fired one bullet at a time and were very popular for army members and were used plenty in the war. The guns were interesting because they are so much different than the guns used today but there isn't much of difference in the engineering used to make them.

Denis Alibegovic
10
 

War of 1812

In the end of the 18th century, tense relations between France and Britain resulted in fighting that hindered American trade with both nations. Attempts by James Madison, the President at the time, to resolve this problem resulted in tense relations with Britain. On top of this, impressment of U.S. seamen and British instigation and provocation with U.S.-Native American relations caused the U.S. to wage war against Britain (History.com Staff). As stated in the article "War of 1812" by History.com Staff, "The Royal Navy...outraged Americans by its practice of Impressment, or removing seamen from U.S. merchant vessels and forcing them to serve on behalf of the British."  Even though America became independent from Britain after the American Revolution, the British never really left North America. They still lived with the Native Americans, and they still occupied parts of Canada (History.com Staff). The British never really left. The outcome of the War of 1812 legitimized America's independence from Britain through a show of impressive military strength. This is also the war that gave birth to the "Star-Spangled Banner" poem inspired by the resilience of Fort McHenry in withstanding twenty-five hours of artillery bombardment from the British (History.com Staff). I believe this war gave America the raging patriotism that is still present in its citizens today.

wendelle ocampo
10
1369-1392 of 1,997 Collections