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Found 2,004 Collections

 

Traqueros, part 3: The Art of Martín Ramírez (1895–1963)

Martín Ramírez (1895–1963) was born in Jalisco, Mexico. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1925 to work in California as a miner and a traquero. Poverty and his need to seek steady work forced him to leave his wife Ana and their four children in Mexico. The Great Depression left him unemployed, and acute mental illness led him to be remanded to the DeWitt State Hospital in Auburn, California in 1948, where he lived until his death in 1963.

As told by the curators at the Smithsonian American Art Museum: "Around 1948, Ramírez began to draw on an eclectic array of paper surfaces—brown wrapping paper, laundry lists, paper cups, old letters—which were glued together to form a unified drawing area. He made use of a variety of tools and techniques, including crayons, colored pencils, watercolors, chalk, ink, and collage.

"Ramírez's motifs reflect his life in two distinct cultures. His highly patterned, intricate drawings present fantastic renditions of subjects such as Mexican soldiers, Madonnas, prairie dogs, cars, and trains. In terms of technique, what is most extraordinary in Ramírez's art is his use of line to create the many different kinds of space—niches, frames, stages—in which his protagonists are placed. Although flatness characterizes the overall effect of his technique, the numerous parallel lines in Ramírez's work bring about a sense of visual depth."

About 450 of Martin Ramirez's drawings and collages are known to exist. He is widely regarded as one of the 20th century's greatest autodidactic artists. His work has been presented in solo exhibitions at museums around the world, including the Centro cultural/Arte contemporáneo in Mexico City (1989), the American Folk Art Museum in New York City (2007, 2009), and the Museo nacional centro de arte Reína Sofía in Madrid (2010).

#EthnicStudies #MexicanAmericans #Traqueros #Railroads #SelfTaught #Latinos #Chicanos #Artists #MartinRamirez

David Colon
5
 

Sami Ryan - 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This project is to demonstrate my knowledge of the 1920s and 1930s using artifacts and to highlight how the times shaped the most important ideals and American values within these decades.

sami ryan
10
 

The great depression

Mabi Aleman
2
 

Daniel Boone and American Ginseng: Truth and Legend

Who was Daniel Boone? Was he more than a stereotypical American frontier hero? Explore Daniel Boone and his relationship to the native plant, ginseng, through this collection and series of activities. 

Daniel Boone (1734-1820) spent much of his adult life blazing trails through the American wilderness. Through exploration and opening the wilderness, Boone and others were able to exploit its many rich resources, including the profitable plant American ginseng. He rose to the status of American legend, becoming known as someone who braved hardship and danger to bring the earth's resources to the market. The legend of Daniel Boone and his-lost-ginseng illustrates the way such stories can reflect historical fact. But become exaggerated or distorted through many generations of story tellers, and, now, via the internet. History and fiction become intertwined. 

While the days of American pioneers are long gone, people still search for and gather wild ginseng in the mountainous regions that Boone frequented. Learn more about Boone's adventures and American ginseng throughout this collection. Be sure to click the Information icon to learn more about each item. 

To learn more about Daniel Boone and his efforts to explore the wilderness, visit the Learning Lab collection -The Wilderness Road- .

Julia Eanes
25
 

Christina Sturgeon 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to learn more about the 1920s and 1930s through real artifacts of these time periods. This will help you understand what life and society was like during these times.

Christina Sturgeon
10
 

Gustavo Marin, 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This project is used to show the important issues of the 1920s and 1930s by using artifacts from that time period.

Gustavo Marin
10
 

Chuck Smith 1920s, 1930s Artifacts Collection

The purpose of the project is to find artifacts that represent the time periods of the 1920's and the 1930's. Then you have to describe the artifacts and why they represent those time periods the best. 

Charlie Smith
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This is a project for my online US history class. Which is about certain artifacts in the 1920s-30s.

ally northrup
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The 1920s and 1930s was a significant time in the United State's history. During this time, many things changed and evolved from the past such as life styles and the entire social structure. This is a collection on the following items that displayed the true colors of this transitional time period for the US.

Justin Lee
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This project is meant to display the standout artifacts of the 20s-30s, and their significance to the time period. 

Emily Duong
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

Find "artifacts" that people used at that time and learn and explain why they were important and how they were used

Cole Dastrup
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this collection is to display the advancements and changes in America throughout the 1920s and 1930s.

Diego Garrido-Clariana
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

Exploring significant events, people, and movements of the 1920s and 1930s through artifacts from that time period.

E. Garmon
10
 

Logan Pannhorst 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project  is to comprehend and perceive the significant developments individuals obtained and the significant occasions individuals experienced during the 1920s and 1930s.

Logan Pannhorst
10
 

John Tadros 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this assignment is to help illustrate the importance of many "Artifacts" or items that were created or used in the 1920s or the 1930s. This is to help open up our knowledge to that of the 1920 and 1930s.

john tadros
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts.

this will be a collection of artifacts in order to show what I think is the most important part of the 20s and 30s

Dylan Faydo
10
 

Isaac Chang 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to see how these artifacts relate to these time periods. How each one has made an impact on the 20s or the 30s.

Isaac Chang
10
 

Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq"

This teaching collection helps students to think critically and globally by using two Thinking Routines to explore the painting, "Shifting States: Iraq," by Cuban American artist Luis Cruz Azaceta. The work is a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.

Included here are the work itself from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, another video from Articulateshow.org, two suggested Thinking Routines - "Colors, Shapes, Lines" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and three other works by Azaceta in the Smithsonian collections.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

Waves of Hope: Asian American History in Austin

In this collection, students will learn about Asian American history in Austin. Austin is home to many Asian Americans along with their rich history, culture, and traditions that are preserved and passed on to future generations by their families and communities. This exhibit showcases some of the history that is lesser known but nevertheless important to document and remember. All of the images can be found at the Austin History Center, which houses an Asian American Archival Collection of manuscript collections, photographs, clippings, books, periodicals and other items.

This exhibit was developed by the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center and the Austin History Center.

Educators and students may use this online exhibit to supplement Texas History lessons and as a supplement to the full exhibit stored at the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center (AARC). Currently, Waves of Hope is not on display at the AARC. Please contact the site at 512-974-1700 or aarc@austintexas.gov with any questions.

keywords: texas history, asian american,  Texas asians, austin, austin history, austin history center, immigration


#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

#TCSAARC  

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
41
 

Analyzing an Oral History Interview: Grant Ichikawa

This collection includes an oral history interview with Grant Hayao Ichikawa (April 17, 1919- December 3, 2017). Ichikawa was a U. S. Army veteran who enlisted after he was relocated to a Japanese American incarceration camp with his family in 1942. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Japanese Americans.

Complementary resources to the podcast audio file include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history, and additional video and audio oral histories with Grant Ichikawa from the Library of Congress American Folklife Center. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: Congressional Gold Medal, veteran, internment camps, World War II, commission, wartime, close listening

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 2: Culture and Resistance, oral history project assignment of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

Ashley Naranjo
23
 

Dismissing the Dead White Guy

This collection explores the necessity, logic, and fairness of the inclusion and/or exclusion of people of history based on gender and/or race. 

Lessons include

Looking Using the Puzzle Strategy

Looking using several various strategies. 

Easily customization by simply using as an individual or group lesson or by requiring all, some, or one of the additional group portraits.

Researching People and Inventions

Recognizing Bias and Objective Analysis

Understanding the Difference Between Bias and Prejudice

Argumentative Essay Writing (Designed as a timed writing for AP Lang, but the prompt could easily be turned into a formal writing assignment. 


#NPGteach

Deborah Eades
15
 

Learning about the Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s through an Individual's Experience: Emilia Castañeda

This collection includes a video interview and testimonial with Emilia Castañeda (April 10, 1926). Castañeda was a young Mexican American girl when she and her family were forced to leave their home and deported to Mexico from the United States in the 1930s. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the federal government's forced removal of Mexican Americans.

Complementary resources to the short film include: Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting an oral history, and additional articles, videos and podcast files highlighting this history.

Use this collection as an extension to the LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes' collection, Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s. *This collection was created to support Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economic, Politics and Policy, Judicial Issues of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

#EthnicStudies #BecauseOfHerStory

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino and Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: unconstitutional deportation, Mexican Americans, repatriation, Great Depression, close listening


Ashley Naranjo
20
 

"Crossing the Delaware": Who is portrayed in American history?

This collection highlights variations on a theme through works of art: George Washington Crossing the Delaware, George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware and Shimomura Crossing the Delaware. Comparisons of these works could serve as springboards for discussions about identity, immigration, "master" or dominant narratives in history, and hero myths.

#EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
7
 

Miró

Look carefully at these artworks by Joan Miró. What do you notice? How are objects represented?

Eveleen Eaton
4
1369-1392 of 2,004 Collections