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Inka Road Symposium 11: Cusco: A New Vision of the Ancient City

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire, with a fascinating look at the material, political, economic, and religious structures that integrated more than one hundred Native nations and millions of people in the powerful Andean Empire known as the Tawantinsuyu. In this segment, José Alejandro Beltrán-Caballero, Universitat Rovira i Virgili; Ricardo Mar, Universitat Rovira i Virgili; and Crayla Alfaro, Architect, Cusco, Perú speak on "Cusco: A New Vision of the Ancient City." José Alejandro Beltrán-Caballero is an architect and an associate researcher at the Seminary of Ancient Topography at Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain. He received his PhD in architecture from Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya–Escola Tècnica Superior d’Arquitectura, Barcelona. His work focuses on the study of ancient settlements in relation to water management and the interpretation of the landscape in ancient cities. He has also worked on virtual reconstruction projects in Europe and South America. Ricardo Mar is a professor of archaeology at Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain. He is an archaeological architect with a PhD from Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona. He has been a guest professor at universities in England, Italy, the United States, Colombia, and Perú. Mar has worked and managed projects in Spain, Portugal, Italy, France, Morocco, Tunisia, Colombia, and Perú. Crayla Alfaro is an architect, with a graduate degree in Management of Cultural Heritage. Her research focuses on the historical evolution of the city of Cusco. Professionally, she has served as Coordinator of the Master Plan for the Historic Center of Cusco in the National Institute of Culture and as Manager of Historical City Center of the Provincial Municipality of Cusco. Alfaro has promoted developing research projects and dissemination of cultural heritage of the historic city of Cusco. She has also participated in the management and renovation of public spaces and housing in the historical perimeter. She is the author and co-author of numerous publications and books related to the research and asset recovery space of Cusco. The symposium was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 25-26, 2015.

Native Achievers Series: Donald L. Fixico

National Museum of the American Indian
Donald L. Fixico (Shawnee/Sac & Fox/ Muscogee Creek/Seminole; distinguished foundation professor of History, Arizona State University) is a policy historian and ethnohistorian who has authored 11 books on American Indian history, treaties, and urban Indians and numerous scholarly articles and publications. Today, he discusses his work and his new book Inside the Lodge: American Indian Oral Tradition, Myth, and Oral History.

Native/American Fashion 15 | Virgil Ortiz

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Creative Collaborations, artist and designer Virgil Ortiz. Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo), contemporary Native American artist and fashion designer, grew up in New Mexico in a family of Cochiti Pueblo potters in which telling stories, collecting clay, gathering wild plants, and producing figurative pottery all were part of everyday life. After a highly successful collaboration with fashion icon Donna Karan, during which he developed boldly patterned textiles based on his graphic decorative painting, Ortiz has since launched his own fashion line. His designs, such as sharp laser-cut leather jackets, swinging taffeta skirts, cashmere sweaters, and silk scarves, echo the voluminous contours and sinuous motifs of Pueblo pottery while showcasing the richness of indigenous high fashion and compelling storytelling of Pueblo culture and history. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native Peoples and Genetic Research 02: Malia Villegas

National Museum of the American Indian
Dr. Malia Villegas (Sugpiaq/Alutiiq), National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center speaks on "Framing the Conversation" "A Spectrum of Perspectives: Native Peoples and Genetic Research" was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 23, 2014.

I’ve Been Indigenous My Whole Life: Images of Indigenous Art and Activism

National Museum of the American Indian
Gregg Deal, a provocative contemporary artist/activist and 15 year resident of the DC metro area, discusses his work, which explores indigenous identity and pop-culture, touching on issues of race relations, historical consideration and stereotype. This is especially true with Deal’s latest performance pieces, The Last American Indian on Earth and REDSKIN. In The Last American Indian on Earth, the artist exploits stereotypes existing in American culture while simultaneously challenging the viewer’s understanding of the Indigenous as both contemporary and relic. REDSKIN, a work that employs acts of micro-aggression (particularly in the way fans of the Washington Football team engage Indigenous people), illustrates the imbalance of equality, authority, and voice within the context of the mascot debate. Within this work, as well as his paintings and murals, Deal advances issues within Indian country such as decolonization, conversations surrounding local and national sports mascots, and cultural appropriation. In his unflinching examination of such heavy subject matter, Deal speaks to these issues with intelligence and sharp wit, remaining keenly aware of his place as an Indigenous man and a contemporary artist. Following his presentation, Deal responds to questions from the audience, further exploring the themes of his art. Gregg Deal (Pyramid Lake Paiute) has appeared on Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell, and most recently The Daily Show. Deal has been published in numerous media outlets, specifically Washington Post, Huffington Post, High Country News, Washington City Paper, Indian Country Today. Learn more about Deal's work at his web site, http://www.greggdeal.com and his FaceBook page, https://www.facebook.com/greggdealart. He tweets @greggdeal. This presentation was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on December 7, 2014 as part of the three-day program, Capture Shawdows: Circulating Images of Native Americans on Film that was produced with support from Maryland's College of Arts and Humanities and the Center fro Literary and Cultural Studies.

Stellar Connections: Explorations in Cultural Astronomy - Complete Symposium

National Museum of the American Indian
In Indigenous worldviews -- where humanity, nature, and the spiritual realm are closely connected -- the night sky provides spiritual and navigational guidance, timekeeping, weather prediction, and stories and legends that tell us how to live a proper life. Cultural astronomy, also referred to as archaeoastronomy or ethnoastronomy, explores the distinctive ways that astronomy is culturally embedded in the practices and traditions of various peoples. In this symposium, experts Michael Wassegijig Price, John MacDonald, Gary Urton, and Babatunde Lawal discuss the cultural astronomy traditions of four indigenous regions/cultures: Ojibwe, Inuit, Andean, and African. For further information, please contact NMAI-SSP@si.edu.

Nation to Nation: 08 Bad Acts / Bad Paper - Mark Macarro

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, and the notable book of the same title that accompanies the exhibition. In this segment, Mark Macarro speaks on the panel topic, "Bad Acts / Bad Paper." Mark Macarro, Tribal Chairman of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians, is serving his eleventh consecutive two-year term on the Council and is in his 19th year as Tribal Chairman. Macarro's vision for the Pechanga people is to see the band strengthen its political self-determination and economic self-sufficiency by developing a diversified economy for the Pechanga Band, while maintaining its distinct and unique cultural identity. Chairman Macarro believes it is critical to maintain and cultivate the Pechanga tribal culture, language, and traditional life ways so that the Pechanga people can preserve their unique ancestral customs and traditions. This symposium was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18. 2014.

Bilingual Storytelling with René Colato Laínez (El Salvador)

National Museum of the American Indian
Bilingual author René Colato Laínez arrived in the U.S. from El Salvador with few possessions, but many dreams for his future. During this program he will talk about his successful journey from his childhood as an immigrant lost in a strange new world, to his life as a teacher and a published author. His presentation is full of music, dreams, and roots, in English and Spanish—and is of course full of stories. Learn his three rules to success: never give up, study hard, and believe in yourself. Colato Laínez is the Salvadoran award-winning author of I Am René, the Boy; Waiting for Papá; and many other books that feature Latin American children learning about cultural identity. His picture books have been finalists for the Tejas Star Book Award, given special recognition by the Paterson Prize, and earned the International Latino Book Award. He was named as one of the "Top Ten New Latino Authors to Watch (and Read)" by latinostories.com.

Nation to Nation: 11 Bad Acts / Bad Paper - Lindsay G. Robertson

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, and the notable book of the same title that accompanies the exhibition. In this segment, Lindsay G. Robertson speaks on the panel topic, "Bad Acts / Bad Paper." Lindsay G. Robertson is a law professor and the faculty director of the Center for the Study of American Indian Law and Policy at the University of Oklahoma. He teaches courses in federal Indian law, comparative Indigenous peoples law, constitutional law, and legal history. Robertson previously taught federal Indian law at the University of Virginia School of Law and the George Washington University National Law Center. He serves as special justice on the Supreme Court of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes and is the author of the award-winning Conquest by Law: How the Discovery of America Dispossessed Indigenous Peoples of Their Lands. This symposium was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18. 2014.

Long Count

National Museum of the American Indian
Alonso Méndez, Tzeltal Maya, describes the Maya Long Count Calendar.

"The Great Inka Road" Family Day - 1 Bolivian Music & Dance

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian celebrates its newest exhibit, "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire," and National Hispanic Heritage Month with a day-long program of family activities and performances. In this video, Tinkus Llajtamanta and Tradiciones Bolivianas, Washington DC area cultural organizations, demonstrate the traditional dances and dress of Bolivia, one of the six South American countries that had been included the Inka Empire's expanse. This is the first of two performances given by these organizations. This performance was webcast live and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on September 13, 2015.

Uk'u'x Ulew: Heart of the Earth 2

National Museum of the American Indian
Grupo Sotz'il is a Kaqchikel Maya contemporary music and dance group founded in El Tablón, Sololá, Guatemala in the year 2000 by the Tat Lisandro Guarcax (1978–2010). Here Grupo Sotz’il presents Uk'u'x Ulew, Heart of Earth, their latest collective choreographic and musical creation. Uk'u'x Ulew, a 60-minute performance of xajoj q'ojom, stresses our interdependence with the Earth. In the performance, all the elements interact in harmony and conflict. From the collusion and collision of these elements, K'aslemal, or the essence of life, is born. The birth of K'aslemal provokes a great jubilance that transgresses the borders of the performance space and reaches into the audience’s world. But when a sudden contrary force disrupts this balance, Tz'i'—the hound that embodies the word—howls to alert us of the danger. Life oscillates between light and dark, order and chaos. • Daniel Fernando Guarcax González: musician/dancer and Grupo Sotz'il’s coordinator, in the role of Iq' (Air/Bird) • Jorge Chiyal Chumil: musician/dancer, in the role of Ya (Water/Fish) • Marcelino Chiyal Yaxón: musician/dancer, in the role of Q'aq' (Fire/Bat) • Juan Carlos Chiyal Yaxón: musician/dancer, in the role of Tz'i' (Word/ Dog) • Luís Cumes: musician/dancer, in the role of Ik' (Moon) • Mercedes García: musician/dancer, in the role of Ix (Earth/Jaguar) • César Augusto Guarcax Chopén: musician/dancer, in the role of K'aslemal (Life) • Víctor Manuel Barillas Crispín: Artistic Director With the coordination of María Regina Firmino-Castillo, coordinator for Grupo Sotz'il’s New England Foundation for the Arts/National Dance Project 2017–2018 Touring Award and acting assistant professor of Critical Dance Studies, University of California-Riverside The presentation of Uk’u’x Ulew: Heart of the Earth is made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and with special thanks to the International Mayan League and the Indigenous Arts Institute. Grupo Sotz’il gave these two performances on September 16, 2017, in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian as part of the museum's celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month. For more on Grupo Sotz'il, visit http://www.gruposotzil.org.gt/ Grupo Sotz'il: iq.sotz.xajoj@gmail.com Grupo Sotz'il, en Uk'u'x Ulew: Corazón de la Tierra Grupo Sotz'il es un grupo de música y danza contemporánea Maya Kaqchikel fundado en El Tablón, Sololá, Guatemala en el año 2000 por Tat Lisandro Guarcax (1978-2010). Aquí Grupo Sotz'il presenta Uk'u'x Ulew, Corazón de la Tierra, su última creación colectiva coreográfica/musical. Uk'u'x Ulew, un montaje escénico de xajoj q’ojom que dura sesenta minutos, enfatiza nuestra interdependencia con la Tierra. En el montaje escénico, todos los elementos interactúan en armonía y en conflicto. De la colusión y colisión de estos elementos nace K'aslemal, o la esencia de la vida. El nacimiento de K'aslemal provoca un júbilo que traspasa las fronteras del escenario y llega al mundo de la audiencia. Pero cuando, repentinamente, una fuerza contraria interrumpe este equilibrio, Tz'i'—el perro que encarna la palabra—aúlla. La vida fluye entre la luz y la oscuridad, el orden y el caos. • Daniel Fernando Guarcax González: músico/danzante y coordinador de Grupo Sotz'il, en el papel de Iq '(Aire/Ave) • Jorge Chiyal Chumil: músico/danzante, en el papel de Ya (Agua/Pez) • Marcelino Chiyal Yaxón: músico/danzante, en el papel de Q'aq '(Fuego/ Murciélago) • Juan Carlos Chiyal Yaxón: músico/danzante, en el papel de Tz'i' (Palabra/ Justicia/Perro) • Luís Cumes: músico/danzante, en el papel de Ik' (Luna) • Mercedes García: músico/danzante, en el papel de Ix (Tierra/Jaguar) • César Augusto Guarcax Chopén: músico/danzante, en el papel de K'aslemal (Vida) • Víctor Manuel Barillas Crispín: Director Artístico Con la coordinación de María Regina Firmino-Castillo, coordinadora del Premio de Gira 2017–2018, NEFA/NDP de Grupo Sotz'il y profesora de Estudios Críticos de Danza, Universidad de California-Riverside La presentación de Uk'u'x Ulew: Corazón de la Tierra es posible gracias al Proyecto Nacional de Danza de la Fundación de New England para las Artes, con apoyo principal de la Fundación Caritativa Doris Duke y la Fundación Andrew W. Mellon, y agradecimientos especiales a la Liga Maya Internacional y al Instituto de Artes Indígenas. El Grupo Sotz'il ofreció estas dos presentaciones el 16 de septiembre de 2017 en el Atrio Potomac del Museo Nacional del Indio Americano como parte de la celebración del Mes Nacional de la Herencia Hispana. Para más información sobre Grupo Sotz'il, visiten http://www.gruposotzil.org.gt/ Grupo Sotz'il: iq.sotz.xajoj@gmail.com

Finding Common Ground 2 | Tiya Miles

National Museum of the American Indian
Finding Common Ground focuses on the complex history of African Americans and Native Americans and how their intertwined stories have become an essential part of American identity. In this segment, Tiya Miles, professor at the University of Michigan, speaks on "The First and the Forced: Tracing Historical Overlaps in Native and Black America." Tiya Miles is a professor at the University of Michigan in the department of American Culture, Afro-American and African Studies, History, and Women’s Studies, and in the Native American Studies Program. Her research interests include African American and Native American intersectional and comparative histories and narratives—especially in the 19th century, as well as slavery, public history, and the historical experiences of women of color. Her books include " That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom," "The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story," and most recently, "The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits." Miles’s numerous fellowships and awards include being named a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 2011. Finding Common Ground is a collaboration between the National Museum of the American Indian and the National Museum of African American History and Culture. It was webcast and recorded in the Rasumson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on February 15, 2018.

Kay WalkingStick Symposium 03 - Jessica Horton

National Museum of the American Indian
The symposium Seizing the Sky: Redefining American Art commemorates the opening of the major retrospective Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist, on view at the National Museum of the American Indian through September 18, 2016. In celebrating the work of Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee), the symposium and exhibition offer a fresh perspective on American art. In this segment, Jessica Horton, University of Delaware, speaks on "Love to Marsden." Jessica L. Horton is an assistant professor of art history at the University of Delaware, specializing in modern and contemporary art and indigenous issues. She holds a PhD in Visual and Cultural Studies from the University of Rochester. Her research has received support from the Getty Research Institute, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of the American Indian, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and the Social Science Research Council. Her essays have appeared in the journals Parkett, American Art, Third Text, and Journal of Transnational American Studies, and in the exhibition catalogue Shapeshifting: Transformations in Native American Art (2012). Her book, Places to Stand: Native American Modernisms on an Undivided Earth, which includes a chapter on Kay WalkingStick’s work, is forthcoming from Duke University Press. The symposium was webcast live and recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 5, 2015.

Simposio sobre el Camino Inka – 07 Observaciones sobre Kallawayas y la Medicina Tradicional

National Museum of the American Indian
El simposio de dos días se realizó para celebrar la histórica inauguración de la exhibición titulada El Gran Camino Inka: Construcción de un Imperio, en el Museo Nacional del Indígena Americano. Esta exhibición ofrece una mirada fascinante a la cultura material, las estructuras políticas, económicas y religiosas que integraron más de cien naciones nativas y millones de personas en el poderoso Imperio andino conocido como el Tawantinsuyu. En este segmento, Walter Álvarez, del Instituto Boliviano de Medicina Tradicional Kallawaya, dio algunas observaciones sobre las prácticas médicas tradicionales de los Kallawayas. El simposio fue grabado en el Teatro Rasmuson del Museo Nacional del Indígena Americano, los días 25 y 26 de junio, 2015.

Strong Women/Strong Nations 8: Maylei Blackwell

National Museum of the American Indian
"Strong Women/Strong Nations: Native American Women & Leadership" is a day-long symposium examining the complex identities of Native women through lively, insightful discussions by elected tribal leaders, activists, artists, and business leaders about the challenges, obstacles, and opportunities confronting women today. In this segment, Maylei Blackwell, University of California, Los Angeles, speaks on "Rebellion at the Roots: Reflections on the Last Twenty Years of Indigenous Women’s Organizing in Mexico." Maylei Blackwell, an interdisciplinary scholar activist, oral historian, and author of ¡Chicana Power! Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement, is an Associate Professor in the César E. Chávez Department of Chicana/o Studies and Women’s Studies Department, and affiliated faculty in the American Indian Studies and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research is based on accompanying indigenous women’s organizers in Mexico, the U.S., and in continental networks across Abya Yala. Her current research focuses on gender, indigeneity, and migration with Zapotecs and Mixtecs from Oaxaca as well as the increasingly Mayan diaspora from Guatemala in Los Angeles. She is currently completing a book entitled Scales of Resistance: Indigenous Women and the Practice of Autonomy. The symposium was webcast and recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on March 18, 2016.

Cherokee Days 2018 - Western Cherokee History Presentation: Ernestine Berry

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this lecture, Ernestine Berry gives a history of the Western Cherokees who became known as the Old Settlers when they moved from Arkansas to Indian Territory. This lecture was webcast live and recorded on April 14, 2018 in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Revealing Ancestral Central America, Part 1

National Museum of the American Indian
This symposium, presented by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), celebrates the landmark exhibition Cerámica de los Ancestros: Central America's Past Revealed, as well as the Smithsonian publication, Revealing Ancestral Central America, edited by Rosemary A. Joyce. This program features leading voices in the interpretation and recovery of the region's rich indigenous heritage. In Part 1, Rosemary A. Joyce (University of California, Berkeley) gives a presentation entitled What Archaeology Reveals about Central America's Past. The symposium, exhibition, and book have their genesis in the Central American Ceramics Research Project, an initiative launched when visiting researchers from the Smithsonian Latino Center realized that the NMAI was quietly caring for one of the largest and most significant collections of Central American archaeology in existence, with approximately 17,000 objects from the region. Astonishingly, this includes more than 10,000 intact vessels, embodying countless untold stories. From figurines depicting powerful women in the Greater Nicoya region to finely decorated vessels of wealthy farming hamlets of the Ulúa Valley and the fantastical designs on Coclé, we can see that the peoples of pre-Hispanic Central America developed uniquely local identities and cultural traditions while also engaging in vital exchanges of ideas, goods, and technologies with their neighbors in all directions. Ranald Woodaman, Exhibitions and Public Programs Director, Smithsonian Latino Center introduces and moderates the symposium. This program was webcast from the National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater on September 8, 2013.

Hawaiian Cultural Festival 2015: Halau Ho`omau I Ka Wai Ola O Hawai`i

National Museum of the American Indian
This year's theme for our annual Hawaiian Cultural Festival is The Epic Journey of Pele and Hi'iaka. In this segment Halau Ho`omau I Ka Wai Ola O Hawai`i perform Hawaiian music and hula. Halau Ho'omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai'i, meaning “through hula and halau, we remain young at heart and full of life,” is a traditional Hawaiian cultural school organized by Suz and Manu Ikaika. The Halau, established in January 2000, is based at Hope United Church in Alexandria, Virginia. This performance was webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on May 17, 2015.

Native Sounds Concert with James Lovell (Garifuna)

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum celebrates Black History Month with an engaging concert of Garifuna music and culture performed by noted Garifuna artist and historian James Lovell. His music is a lively manifestation of the Afro-Carib-Arawak mix that originated in St. Vincent and is now found along the Caribbean coast of Central America, including his home country of Belize. This concert was webcast live and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on February 18, 2017.

We Are Here! Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship 2012: Skawennati

National Museum of the American Indian
Preview panel & reception May 31, 6 pm, at National Museum of the American Indian in New York. RSVP 212-514-3750 or NYRSVP@si.edu . Exhibition through September 23. Organized by the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art of Indianapolis, Indiana, We Are Here! includes work by Fellowship recipients Alan Michelson (Mohawk), Bonnie Devine (Ojibwa), Skawennati (Mohawk), Duane Slick (Meskwaki/Ho-Chunk), and Anna Tsouhlarakis (Navajo/Creek/Greek). With painting, photography, installation art, video and sculpture, the exhibition provides insight to the issues, concerns and methods of leading Native artists working today.

Cherokee Days 2015: Traditional Dances 1

National Museum of the American Indian
Cherokee Days 2105 is the museum's second festival featuring storytelling, films, dance, music, family activities and demonstrations from citizens of the Cherokee Nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee, who are partnering on this program that shares the true Cherokee story. In this segment, Cherokee dancers demonstrate several traditional dances, including the groundhog dance, the bison dance, the friendship dance, and the stomp dance. This presentation was webcast from the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indians on April 11, 2015.

Suma Qamaña 2014 Bolivian Festival 04: Huayño Potosino

National Museum of the American Indian
Suma Qamaña celebrates the spirit of "Living Well" in this four day festival hosted by the Embassy of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, highlighting the indigenous cultures of Bolivia through dance and song. In this segment, Ballet Somos Bolivia perform the Huayño Potosino. he Huayño is an important Andean music genre and dance of pre-hispanic origin. It is currently widespread among Andean countries that were part of Tawantinsuyu, mainly in Peru and Bolivia, but also in northern Argentina and Chile. The name of this genre comes from the Quechua word "huayñunakunay," which means dancing while holding hands. Huayño adopts several varieties, according to the traditional trends of the locality or region, and in some ways represents the ancestral popular culture of the Andean culture. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 5, 2014.

Native Peoples and Genetic Research 10: Rosita Worl

National Museum of the American Indian
Dr. Rosita Worl (Tlingit), Sealaska Heritage Institute, addresses the second panel topic, "Genomics & Ancestry: Ethics, Origins, and Policy," by speaking on "Haa Shuká and Haa Latseen: Knowledge of Our Ancestors" "A Spectrum of Perspectives: Native Peoples and Genetic Research" was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 23, 2014.
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