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Found 1,658 Collections

 

Native American Assimilation

During the late 19th century, reformers in the United States like Helen Hunt Jackson pushed for a change in attitude towards Native Americans. Rather than simply viewing them as enemies from whom land could be gained, these reformers promoted the concept of assimilation, or helping Native Americans adopt the characteristics of white culture that would allow them to be successful in American society. One of the ways they did this was through the use of Christian boarding schools for Native American children. Federal laws, like the Dawes Act of 1887, also supported this goal.

As you investigate the artifacts, images, and readings in this collection, consider whether you think

assimilation was a beneficial policy for Native Americans.

Tags: point of view, assimilation, assimilate, American Indians, Carlisle, Jim Thorpe, allotment

Amy Kerr
13
 

Inventing Scotland

What makes something Scottish and who decides this? Using the Smithsonian archives this collection features a range of objects and images, some traditionally Scottish and some less so, and asks students to consider how we represent countries and what problems that can present. See 'Information' button for lesson plans.

Amy Johnstone
35
 

Using Portraiture to Teach the Struggle for Justice

This collection supports the January 2017 Google Hangout facilitated by the National Portrait Gallery in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

#NPGteach

Briana White
22
 

Jumping In Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery

In this collection, we look at portraiture through the lens of the jumping in looking strategy. This looking strategy allows participants a more sensory experience with the portrait.

Visually rich portraits, with both objects and setting, are most effective when using this strategy.

Included in this collection are examples of portraits National Portrait Gallery educators have had success with when facilitating the jumping in looking strategy while teaching in the galleries: George Washington Carver, Alice Waters, E.O. Wilson, George Washington, Men of Progress, Shimomura Crossing the Delaware, and Tony Hawk
Briana White
13
 

American Revolution

#TeachingInquiry

Sarah Rafalowitz
6
 

Samuel Langley, Solar Scientist

Samuel Langley was the director of the Allegheny Observatory very near the city of Pittsburgh. Langley focused his telescope on the sun each clear day hoping to find its secrets and energy output.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

Albert Bierstadt and the Lure of the West

Easterners heard many stories about the dangers of traveling to the American west. Accounts of the great American desert as an almost impossible place to cross caused many to rethink leaving home. Albert Bierstadt and painters of the Hudson River School traveled the west and sent back their impressions of the landscape and wildlife.

Arthur Glaser
13
 

George Catlin: Indian Portraiture

During the 1830s, George Catlin and his team produced over five hundred images of native American life on the western plains. Nearly half of his work consisted of exquisite portraits of Indians of many different tribes. Some tribes like the Hidatsa disappeared before any other visual representation of them could be made.

Arthur Glaser
25
 

George Catlin: Lives of the Plains Indians

Long before the camera went west, artists like George Catlin were preserving the images of the native Americans on the western plains. Catlin's paintings are numerous and divide into two genre: the group activities and portraiture. This learning lab focuses on group activities of many plains indians including hunting, traditional dances, and recreation.

Arthur Glaser
32
 

American stereotype: All Black Pilgrim Attire

Every year near Thanksgiving, images of our Pilgrims father begin to proliferate showing them as very austere and wearing only black clothing. This learning lab introduces images of Pilgrims that are compared with written primary sources. It was customary in the 17th century to inventory all the belongings of the deceased before they were distributed to the heirs. These inventories and the wills themselves provide detailed information about the attire of everyday Pilgrims of this period.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

Jamestown: Challenge for Survival

The early years in Virginia's first colony were fraught with starvation and illness. Many of the Jamestown colonists were not "survivors". Most were gentlemen searching for gold and riches and had no experience living in the wilderness. America was a challenge: the forest primeval had never been cut, there was no available farmland, few had experience at fishing or hunting and gathering. Our story about tells about the ultimate in desperation.

Arthur Glaser
31
 

Gender Inequality and Identity: Childe Hassam's Tanagra (The Builders, New York) 1918

This collection includes a multi-day lesson plan built around Childe Hassam's Tanagra (The Builders, New York), 1918, and is designed to explore the effect that gender inequality can have on identity. Lessons are designed for an eleventh-grade, American Studies, Humanities-style course, and the historical context is the Gilded Age and the Women's Suffrage Movement. The plan for this mini-unit includes the analysis of visual, literary, and historical texts, and while it has a historical context, the goal is also to make connections to American life today. The essential question for this mini-unit is this: How can unfair gender norms affect what it feels like to be a human being? Included, you will find a lesson plan as well as digital versions of the artistic, literary, and historical texts needed to execute that plan. #SAAMteach

William Connell
21
 

Interacting with Our Environment: Whose Home Is It?

Photos and paintings of Algonquin Provincial Park are grouped with Tom Uttech's "Mamakadendagwad."  What is the impact when someone or something enters an environment or ecosystem?  Lesson could be an introduction for multiple content areas.  In science, students could study mammals, birds, and insects of Ontario, Canada; ecosystems; and invasive species. In history, what is the wilderness? It could be paired with Charle C. Mann's argument about Native American and European impact on land in Jamestown.  It could also be paired with Juane Quick-to-See Smith's painting "State Names" to consider how humans name places they settle.  English students could extend the discussion by reading Iroquois creation myths and Joseph Bruchac's "Snapping Turtle."  #SAAMteach

Deborah Howe
13
 

Are the benefits of progress during the Industrial Revolution more significant than the costs?

Below you will find a variety of sources that connect to the Industrial Revolution. These sources will aid in your answering of the following guiding questions:

(1) What changes were made in manufacturing? (2) How did society benefit from industrialization? and (3) What were the challenges society faced during industrialization?

At the conclusion of your investigation, you should be able to address in detail the Essential Question: Are the benefits of progress during the Industrial Revolution more significant than the costs?

Leah Knecht
16
 

Mummy Science - Natural and Cultural Preserved Remains

This Smithsonian Science How learning collection, from Q?rius at the National Museum of Natural History, is part of a distance learning program at http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast This collection focuses on the science of mummies. Targeted at middle schoolers, the collection invites students into an authentic understanding of how mummies form, both naturally and culturally. Physical and forensic anthropologist Dr. David Hunt is featured as an expert explainer. The collection includes an interactive webcast video with discussion questions, cross-cutting activities, an independent project, and other resources for teachers and students.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Key Terms: physical anthropology, archaeology, skeletal remains, mummification, burial practices, decomposition, culture

Key Concepts:

Skeletal analysis for age, sex, ancestry, and health

Cultural burial practices over time

Chemical process of mummification

Scientific benefits of studying mummies

Technology used by physical anthropologists

Eric Albro
13
 

History & Hair: Lesson and Collection

What does your hair reveal about your identity? This guided lesson and image gallery invites students to explore their  identity and  to interrogate the role that hair plays in the presentation of self. Using artful looking techniques, students can think critically about the dynamic between the subject and the artist. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGTeach #Hair #History #SocialStudies #Afros #Identity 

DanSymonds
22
 

Complications of Mobilizing the American Homefront 1942-1945

#SAAMteach

This collection examines artwork paired with both primary and secondary sources  that illustrates the complications of mobilizing the American homefront between 1942-1945.  

patty
4
 

Benjamin West: America's First Painter

Benjamin West began painting in America during the late colonial period. His works represented a variety of styles. He was equally good at portraiture which was what most customers wanted and romantic renditions of battle scenes. Later in his career he devoted much of his time to Greek and Roman mythological themes.

Arthur Glaser
25
 

A Just Society

This collection, first of all, is a work in progress and may change as time goes on. The collection includes pieces that are meant to prompt students to think how to create a "just society" and potential consequences when those ideals don't become reality. #SAAMteach

Nikysha (Nikki) Gilliam
20
 

Ancient River Valley Civilizations Influence

Did the Ancient River Valley Civilizations influence future civilizations in a positive or negative way?

#TeachingInquiry

arvc
20
 

Ted Kennedy: 1980 Democratic Primary Campagin

Edward Moore "Ted" Kennedy (1932-2009) was an American politician and lawyer who served as a United States Senator from Massachusetts. Kennedy finally decided to seek the Democratic nomination in the 1980 Presidential Election by launching an unusual, insurgent campaign against the incumbent Carter, a member of his own party. On the penultimate day, Kennedy conceded the nomination and called for a more liberal party platform in what many saw as the best speech of his career.

Tags: politics, campaign, election, vote, Kennedy, 1980, Democrat, president, candidate, primary, primaries, Democratic Party, Ted Kennedy

sheishistoric
9
 

Frontier Democracy: Western Pennsylvania and the United States Constitution

This curriculum pack was produced by the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania and includes everything you need to teach about the growth of democracy and impact of the Constitution in Western Pennsylvania. The student text includes readings that you can give directly to your students, and the info tabs on items throughout the collection includes suggested teaching activities. Primary sources and biographies are also included (be sure to click on the paper clip and/or info icon on each item to find out more about it). 

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
22
 

"We Didn't Start The Fire": World Headlines, 1949-1989

"We Didn't Start the Fire" is a song by Billy Joel. Its lyrics include brief, rapid-fire allusions to more than 100 headline events between 1949, the year of Joel's birth, and 1989, when the song was released. This topical collection and image gallery represents references in the song. What makes these events headlines? What events does Joel leave out? How do these resources reflect the headlines, ideas, and concerns addressed by Joel? 

sheishistoric
99
 

Mosquitoes: Vectors for Zika, Malaria, and Yellow Fever

This topical collection examines mosquito-borne illnesses from the perspectives of art, history, public health, science, and visual thinking strategies. Specifically, the Zika virus and historic malaria and yellow fever are studied through the Smithsonian's national insect collection. Includes specimens and objects related to mosquitoes, as well as artworks and articles. 

Tracie Spinale
84
1321-1344 of 1,658 Collections