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Found 2,525,064 Resources

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple flat one-piece form of shaped blade tapering to curved point at end of handle; matte finish.

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple one-piece form of three-pronged fork tapering to curved point at end of handle; matte finish.

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple one-piece form of flared three-pronged fork tapering to curved point at end of handle; matte finish.

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple one-piece form of oval bowl tapering to curved point at end of handle; matte finish.

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple one-piece form of oval bowl tapering to curved point at end of handle; matte finish.

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple one-piece form of three-pronged fork tapering to curved point at end of handle; matte finish.

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple one-piece form of circular bowl with handle projecting from left edge and tapering to curved point at end; matte finish.

"Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Ac-cent-tchu-ate the Positive," with words by Johnny Mercer and music by Harold Arlen. It was published by Edwin H. Morris, Inc. in New York, New York in 1944. This song was featured in the 1944 Paramount Pictures romantic comedy musical film Here Come the Waves, directed by Mark Sandrich and starred Bing Crosby, Betty Hutton, and Sonny Tufts. The cover features images of the stars of the film.

"Ace" Lieut. Edward H. O'Hare

National Museum of American History

"Achiote" Red Dye

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Aero Series" compact

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"Aero Series", deluxe

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"African Arts: Old and New" Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also Acc. No. 94-088, Box 2.

Updated as part of the Exhibits Modernization Program.

In Hall of the Cultures of Africa and Asia, also known as Hall 7,℗ at the Museum of Natural History.

"Afro-American Art" Exhibition

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

"Afro-American Art" exhibition at National Collection of Fine Arts, now known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

"After All"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "After All," with words by Edwin Gilbert and Paul Denniker and music by Alec Fogarty and "Zammy" Simmons. It was published by Joe Davis, Inc. in New York, New York in 1935.

"After You're Gone"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "After You've Gone," by Henry Creamer and Turner Layton. It was published by Broadway Music Corporation in 1918.

"After a Hot Chase Drake Overtook Her" (Drake and the Indians)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"Afternoon Chat" Copyright 19 DEC 1906

National Anthropological Archives
Women and girls on adobe house terrace.

"Agriculture and Industry" coverlet, Figured and Fancy; double-cloth; 1836; New York

National Museum of American History
An unknown weaver created this red and white, Figured and Fancy, double-cloth coverlet featuring a “Double Rose” with a dotted ground centerfield, commonly found in New York coverlets. There are eagles, stars, Masonic symbols, and Federal-style buildings repeated in all four borders. These words are woven into to each corner, “AGRICULTURE & MANUFACTURES, ARE THE FOUNDATION OF OUR INDEPENDENCE July 4, 1836.” This cotton and wool, double-woven Jacquard coverlet was made for C. Collings in 1836 in New York State. This coverlet design has been replicated numerous times dated from 1824-1840 and appears in major museums across the country. This design was initially associated with weaver, James Alexander of New York, but the consensus has changed. This group of coverlets was possibly woven by more than one weaver whose identities have not been found. The floral medallions harken back to Scottish and English double-woven, ingrain carpet designs. See also, T16116 and T18131.

"Agriculture and Manufacture," Figured and Fancy, double-cloth coverlet; 1840; New York

National Museum of American History
This Jacquard double-cloth coverlet features a tulip, carpet medallion centerfield with eagle, federal architecture, and masonic motif borders. Inscribed in the coverlet’s corners and top and bottom edges are the name of the client, "Esther Jewil" and the phrase and date, "Agriculture & Manufactures are the Foundation of Our Independence. July 4, 1840." This coverlet was woven in Dutchess County, New York in 1840. Ester Jewell (1757-1844) was the recipient of this coverlet. It is interesting that the Jewell’s commissioned this coverlet just four years before her death. Esther’s husband, Isaac Jr., father-in-law, Isaac Sr., and brother-in-law were veterans of the American Revolution.

This particular design and inscription was woven numerous times, and there are dated coverlets of this pattern from 1824-1840. Likely because of its bold patriotic statement, this coverlet design appears in major museums across the country. NMAH has another red and white coverlet of the same design. This design was initially associated with Scots-Irish weaver, James Alexander, but the consensus has changed as Alexander had retired from weaving in 1828 and none of the client names in Alexander’s account book matched those found on extant “Agriculture and Manufacture” coverlets.

This group of coverlets was almost certainly woven by more than one weaver whose identities have not yet been found. The weavers were also almost certainly apprentices or journeymen working with Alexander before his retirement. The floral medallions harken back to Scottish and English double-woven carpet designs and are identical to those found on Alexander’s earlier coverlets. Even the Masonic and eagle borders featured on this coverlet are more refined versions of borders found on Alexander coverlets.

The National Museum of American History also possesses two more of these “Agriculture and Manufacture” coverlets (see T14962 and T18131). Perhaps, Alexander sold his weaving equipment and patterns to former apprentices who joined in partnership? There are two groups of these coverlets and over 125 of them known. One group was woven in two sections and joined with a center seam, the other group was woven on a broad loom and does not have the center seam. The Esther Jewell coverlet falls into the latter group. Broad looms required either two weavers or the use of a fly shuttle to get the weft yarn back and forth across the wider width of the fabric, otherwise the loom and fabric width was dictated by the weaver’s arm width. There is also so speculation as to whether these particular patterns were executed on a draw loom of with the help of a Jacquard mechanism. Alexander’s weaving career almost entirely predates the introduction of the Jacquard head into the United States, suggesting that these coverlets which are so much in his fashion were almost certainly also woven on a draw loom.

Being double-cloth, this coverlet has two sets of warps and wefts made of an Indigo wool 2-ply, S-twist, Z-spun warp and weft and a cotton 2-ply, S-Twist, Z-spun warp and weft. The warps and wefts change place throughout the weaving process, creating the contrasting designs and strengthening the structure and creating a heavier and warmer textile.

"Ain't That Something Now"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Ain't That Something Now," with words and music by Dave Oppenheim, Milton Berle, and Henry Tobias. It was published by Mills Music, Inc. in 1939. The cover features an image of American vaudevillian, musician, and actor Joe Cook [born Joseph Lopez] (1890-1959), who performed this song in the Broadway show Off to Buffalo, which premiered at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in New York on February 21, 1939.

"Aino of Yezo" 1853 Drawing/Painting

National Anthropological Archives
Colored pencil Watercolor and on paper drawing and painting on cardboard mount

Two Men from Hokkaido Island in Costume

"Airtime" garment label

National Museum of American History
On August 2, 1995, police officers raided a fenced seven-unit apartment complex in El Monte, California. They arrested eight operators of a clandestine garment sweatshop and freed 72 workers who were being forced to sew garments in virtual captivity. Smuggled from Thailand into the United States, the laborers’ plight brought a national spotlight to domestic sweatshop production and resulted in increased enforcement by federal and state labor agencies. The publicity of the El Monte raid also put added pressure on the apparel industry to reform its labor and business practices domestically and internationally.

"Airtime" garment labels, 1990s

National Museum of American History
On August 2, 1995, police officers raided a fenced seven-unit apartment complex in El Monte, California. They arrested eight operators of a clandestine garment sweatshop and freed 72 workers who were being forced to sew garments in virtual captivity. Smuggled from Thailand into the United States, the laborers’ plight brought a national spotlight to domestic sweatshop production and resulted in increased enforcement by federal and state labor agencies. The publicity of the El Monte raid also put added pressure on the apparel industry to reform its labor and business practices domestically and internationally.
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