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Oral history interview with Pietro Lazzari, 1964

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 77 p.

An interview of Pietro Lazzari conducted in 1964, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Phillips Sanderson, 1965 April 1

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 20 pages.

An interview of Phillips Sanderson conducted, 1965 April 1, by Sylvia Loomis, for the Archives of American Art, at the artist's home, in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Oral history interview with Philip Guston, 1965 January 29

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 5 pages Interview of Philip Guston conducted on January 29, 1965, by Joseph Trovato, in the artist's home in Woodstock, New York, for the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project.
Guston briefly provides biographical information and spends the remainder of his time speaking of his experiences working on the Mural Project (PWAP) in Los Angeles; his move to New York working under Reginald Marsh as a non-relief artist; his multiple mural projects in New York (Penn Station Subway, Queensbridge Housing Project, WPA Mural for the World's Fair, etc.); his success in WPA Fine Arts competitions; his move to Woodstock, New York; his time spent teaching at the University of Iowa; his many influences (Renaissance, Modern and Abstract Painters); his personal/professional feelings about the WPA as well as his political feelings about it.

Oral history interview with Patricia Stanley Cunningham, 1964 July 28

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 24 pages An interview of Patricia Stanley Cunningham conducted 1964 July 28, by Mary Fuller McChesney, for the Archives of American Art.
Cunningham speaks of her training at the University of California, Berkeley; her work for the Federal Art Project as a muralist in public school buildings and on the easel painting project; how her work was supervised; artists she knew; and the effect of the Federal Art Project on her career. She recalls Bruce Ariss, Burton Boundey, Beniamino Bufano, and Amalie Waldo.

Oral history interview with Otis Dozier, 1965 June 10

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 16 pages

An interview of Otis Dozier conducted 1965 June 10, by Sylvia Loomis, for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project.

Oral history interview with Olinka Hrdy, 1965 Mar. 13-Mar. 17

Archives of American Art
Sound recordings: 3 sound tape reels ; 3 in. Transcript: 59 p. An interview of Olinka Hrdy conducted 1965 Mar. 13-Mar. 17, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project.
Hrdy discusses her childhood in Oklahoma; Native American culture and its influence on her work; studying and mural painting at the University of Oklahoma; influence of music in herwork; outlining technique in her painting; working in Tulsa; the Nicholas Rorick Museum; textile design; Dynamic Symmetry; working for Seymore Lipton, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Hans Schwitzer; relationship with Wright; Taliesin; the project period; her projects in California; job as Chief Designer for the State of CA; her personal creative approach. She recalls Bruce Goff, Dorothy Jenkins, and Suzanne Miller.

Oral history interview with Mordi Gassner, 1982 Apr. 16

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 3 sound files digital, wav file Transcript: 24 pages An interview with Mordi Gassner conducted 1982 Apr. 16, by Buck Pennington, for the Archives of American Art.
Gassner speaks of growing up in Brooklyn, NY; attending Parsons Design School (then called New York School of Fine and Applied Art); opening a studio and designing signs for the Strand Theater; walking from El Paso, Texas to Phoenix to improve his eye condition; beginning work in Hollywood and working on set designs for Douglas Fairbanks and Cecille DeMille; moving back to New York to teach art in a Big Brother program; creating his mural, Mural Monument to Modern Culture; receiving a Guggenheim Fellowship and spending two years in Florence before returning to New York during the Depression; being invited to work back in Hollywood for Disney Studios and with Ernest Schoedsack only to have the films cancel production; his one-man show at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; his involvement with the Artists' Union and the American Artists' Congress; creating Op art during World War I, and later designing visual aids for the armed services during World War II; becoming the art director of ABC [American Broadcasting Corporation]; working later at the Metropolitan Opera as a scenic painter; moving to Drakes Branch, Virginia after his retirement.

Oral history interview with Monty Lewis, 1964 June 25

Archives of American Art
Sound recordings: 1 sound tape reel ; 5 in. Transcript: 15 p. An interview of Monty Lewis conducted 1964 June 25, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art.
Interview conducted at Coronado School of Fine Arts in San Diego, Calif. Lewis discusses his art training at the Art Students' League in N.Y., his study of mural and easel painting in Europe, and his freelance mural work before his involvement with the Public Works of Art Project. He describes the developing presence of mural art in New York with Diego Rivera's mural at Rockefeller Center and the 1939 New York World's Fair. Lewis tells of the Artists, Painters, and Sculptors Collaborators, a collaborative group interested in developing community art projects, and discusses the use of murals in the 1939 New York World's Fair and the different techniques used for those and other public projects.

Oral history interview with Millard Sheets, 1986 October-1988 July

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 167 pages. An interview with Millard Sheets conducted 1986 October-1988 July, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Sheets speaks of his childhood and early education; attending Chouinard Art Institute and being influenced by instructor F. Tolles Chamberlin; teaching at Scripps College Foundation of Art from 1931 to 1955; the beginnings of the California Watercolor Society; his painting career; his thoughts on Southern California Modernism; the growth and development of California art; artists including Lorser Feitelson and Rico Lebrun; designing forty buildings for Howard Ahmanson from the 1950s through the 1970s; his relationships with art critics; his involvement with architecture and design; and his philosophy as an art teacher. He recalls Theodore Modra and Dalzell Hatfield.

Oral history interview with Milford Zornes, 1999 July 18-September 5

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 152 pages An interview of Milford Zornes conducted 1999 July 18-September 5, by Susan M. Anderson, for the Archives of American Art, in Zornes' studio/home, Claremont, California.
Beginning with his childhood in Oklahoma, this interview recounts the formative influences on Mr. Zornes' development as an artist, including his close relationship with Millard Sheets at Pomona College. He discussed the impact of the Mexican muralist Jose Clemente Orozco on his work and on other artists of the California School as well as the importance of nature. He recalled his prolific work on federally-funded art projects such as the PWAP and his mural commission for the Claremont Post Office. Mr. Zornes discussed the impact that WWII had on the California School in general and his particular experience on the China-Burma-India front as one of forty-two official US army artists. He described his long career as a teacher in various educational institutions as well as in outdoor painting workshops conducted around the world. Finally, Mr. Zornes discussed his struggle with macular degeneration and the subsequent change in his working methods due to his recent blindness.

Oral history interview with Milford Zornes, 1965 June 30

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 31 pages

An interview of Milford Zornes conducted 1965 June 30, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art. Zornes speaks of his childhood; never intending to become an artist until junior college in California; teaching art class; a workshop he is holding in his studio at Mt. Carmel, Utah; studying with Millard Sheets and F. Tolles Chamberlain and their influence; the murals he worked on under the Federal Art Project; being drafted into the army and working as an army artist; working an engineering job at Thule Air Base in Greenland; illustrating books; his thoughts on the Federal Art Project and his experiences with it; and how President and Mrs. Roosevelt chose his watercolors to be permanently housed in the White House. He recalls Maynard Dixon, Robert Ortley[?], Millard Sheets, Tom Craig, F. Tolles Chamberlain, Nelbert Chouinard, William Manker, David Scott, Thomas Beggs, Paul Sample, Sisqueiros, Orozco, Hartley Burr Alexander, George Biddle, and others.

Oral history interview with Michael Spafford and Elizabeth Sandvig, 1992 September 2-4

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 99 pages.

An interview of Michael Spafford and Elizabeth Sandvig conducted 1992 September 2-4, by Paul Karlstrom, at their home in Seattle, Washington, for the Archives of American Art. Spafford and Sandvig discuss their marriage and their separate careers, and the controversy and trial resulting from Spafford's "Labors of Hercules" murals at the Washington State Capital Assembly Chamber in Olympia.

Oral history interview with Merlin F. Pollock, 1979 July 30 and 1980 July 30

Archives of American Art
5 sound files : digital, wav file

Transcript: 65 pages

An interview with Merlin F. Pollock conducted 1979 July 30 and 1980 July 30, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Pollock speaks of his training at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Fontainebleau, France; his work as instructor of mural painting at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1935-1943; his paintings of Alaska commissioned by the government in 1937 and his work as supervisor of mural painting for the Illinois WPA, 1940-1943. He also discusses Chicago artists and his own murals for the government.

Oral history interview with Maxine Albro and Parker Hall, 1964 July 27

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 44 pages An interview of Maxine Albro and Parker Hall conducted by Mary McChesney on 1964 July 27 for the Archives of American Art.
Albro speaks of her educational background including her work with Paul O'Higgins and as an assistant to Diego Rivera; of fresco and mosaic techniques; her mural at Coit Tower for the Public Works of Art Project; mosaics at San Francisco State College; her relationship with George Gaethke, Urban Neininger, Ralph Stackpole, Bernard Zakheim, and others; the Allied Artists Guild; the influence of the Federal Art Project on her career; and Ray Bertrand's lithography project. Parker Hall comments on his fresco at Coit Tower and other projects. Also present at the interview is Robert McChesney.

Oral history interview with Max Spivak, circa 1965

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 58 pages. An interview of Max Spivak conducted circa 1963, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art.
Spivak speaks of how he went from being an accountant to doing art; moving to Paris for three years, and how this experience changed his life; the difference between painting in Europe and painting in America; moving back to New York; why he decided to leave Paris and move back to New York; the importance of intuitive feeling; his involvement with the Gibson Committee; how he and some members of the Gibson Committee thought of the WPA; his experiences with the PWAP at the Whitney Museum; picketing outside the Mirror; his and the other artists experiences with the Project; the development of the Artist Congress; the nature of art; his work on mosaic murals; how art started losing support from the government by the late thirties; doing murals for big companies; the waning moments of the Project. He recalls Arshile Gorky, Holger Cahill, Audrey McMahon, Lee Krasner, Harold Rosenberg, Harry Knight, Lou Block, and others.

Oral history interview with Marion Greenwood, 1964 Jan. 31

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 15 p. An interview of Marion Greenwood conducted on 1964 Jan. 31, by Dorothy Seckler, for the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project.
Greenwood speaks of her background and education; her mural work before joining the Treasury Relief Art Project; working on murals for the Red Hook Housing Project in Brooklyn, N.Y.; changing from murals to easel paintings; and her opinions regarding government support for the arts.

Oral history interview with Marcelle Labaudt, 1964 Sept. 16

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 22 p. An interview of Marcelle Labaudt conducted 1964 Sept. 16, by Mary McChesney, for the Archives of American Art.
The interview concerns Marcelle Labaudt's husband, the painter, muralist and educator Lucien Labaudt.

Oral history interview with Manuel J. Tolegian, 1965 February 12

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 58 pages

An interview of Manuel J. Tolegian conducted 1965 February 12, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Lowell Houser, 1964 July 31

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 1 sound tape reel ; 5 in. Transcript: 7 p. An interview of Lowell Houser conducted by Betty Hoag, on 1964 July 31, for the Archives of American Art.
Interview conducted in San Diego, Calif. Houser speaks of his background; his art education; the influence of the Mexican muralists on his art; his involvement with the Federal Art Project working on murals at Iowa State College, a post office in Ames, Iowa, and other places; and his choices of subject matter for murals.

Oral history interview with Louis Schanker, circa 1963

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 74 pages.

An interview of Louis Schanker conducted circa 1963, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Louis Bouché, 1963 March 13

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 53 pages An interview of Louis Bouché conducted on 1963 March 13, by William E. Woolfenden, for the Archives of American Art.
Bouché speaks of the Penguin Club, including Walt Kuhn's leadership, artists' balls, banquets and sketch classes; European artists at the Penguin Club including Jules Pascin, Albert Gleizes, and others; his association with the Daniel Gallery; his "lace curtain period"; his art education; teaching; working at Wanamaker's and the Folsom Gallery; Walter Arensberg's parties; and his father, Henri's career as a designer. Bouché recalls Marcel Duchamp, Samuel Wood Gaylor, Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, John Quinn, and others.

Oral history interview with Louis Bouché, 1959 August 7

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 23 pages. An interview of Louis Bouché conducted on 1959 August 7, by John D. Morse, for the Archives of American Art.
Bouché speaks of his art education in France; painting trips to Brittany; studying at the Art Students League with Dimitri Romanovsky and Frank Vincent DuMond; the Armory Show, 1913; managing a gallery at Wanamaker's (the Wanamaker Gallery of Modern Decorative Art) in the 1920s; his technique and materials; teaching; the Penguin Club; his taste in books and music; and abstract expressionism.

Oral history interview with Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg, 1965 Mar. 17

Archives of American Art
Sound recordings: 3 sound tape reels ; 3 in. Transcript: 42 p. An interview of Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg conducted 1967 Mar. 17, by Betty Hoag McGlynn, for the Archives of American Art.
Lundberg and Feitelson speak of work they did after their Federal Art Project (FAP) careers ended; exhibitions both participated in; their work with the Los Angeles Art Association; murals they did for the FAP; their work in printmaking for the FAP; some of their colleagues on the FAP; their opinions of the long-term effects of the FAP; the future of government support for the arts; and their mural techniques and materials.

Oral history interview with Kenneth M. Adams, 1964 April 23

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 21 pages An interview of Kenneth Miller Adams conducted 1964 April 23, by Sylvia Glidden Loomis, for the Archives of American Art.
Adams discusses his involvement with federal art projects in Taos, New Mexico, including easel painting and mural painting for the Treasury Relief Art Project (TRAP) and the Public Works of Art Project (PWAP). He describes the contracts and methods of TRAP; he recalls Gustave Baumann, George Biddle, Emil J. Bisttram, Raymond Jonson, Willard Nash, and other associated with the federal projects of the WPA. He also reflects on his role as artist-in-residence at the University of New Mexico.
97-120 of 336 Resources