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Found 340 Resources

Exhibition Poster: Vito Acconci's "The Peoplemobile," Mobile Installation Project for Town Squares in Holland

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster for a travelling art project. Recto: The poster image is derived from the text, top : "VITO ACCONCI (printed in black)/ THE PEOPLEMOBILE(printed in red)/. Imprinted in black, bottom half of the sheet: (PROJECT FOR TOWN SQUARES IN HOLLAND)", followed by list of Dutch city names serving as tour stops and dates, starting from "DAM AMSTERDAM 17 18 19 MEI 13 - 18 UUR, and ending in the GROTE MARKT GRONINGEN 13 14 JUNI 14 - 21 UUR". Iconic orange squares with picture of some parts of truck are placed in between texts. Verso: In four vertical columns, from left to right, is explanation in Dutch, accompanied by diagrams, for how Acconci has designed the portable art project as a flat-bed truck carrying 28 steel panels, which are used to assemble and construct a structure at each stop on the tour.

The Amenities of 2030

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Illustration for Frederick Edwin Smith’s book, The World in 2030 A.D., for which Kauffer produced a series of drawings using an airbrush technique. At bottom, two rows of people sit in chairs watching a presenter, standing in front of them. The standing figure points to a large presentation screen above. On the screen, a depiction of an artist mannequin running to the right, and a note on the diagram at upper left that reads: Chart A / Movement.

Wedding Invitation, Los Angeles, July 30, 1994: "Help Them Celebrate their Marriage"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster announcement, with text and images throughout, providing location, directions, date of J. M. Jewett and G. P. Kirkpatrick's wedding and reception. Hand-lettered text in a variety of styles and sizes; at center, heart and telephone. Affixed to bottom center, USA 19 cents postage stamp (fawn). On verso, elements include motto from chocolate wrapper, Betty Boop, flower diagrams, round orange sticker affixed to center of flower (top, center). Printed in blue ink.

Zvetšenina [Blow Up]

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The white background is divided by a grid into seven sections. Going clockwise, the sections are: (1)title: following upper margin "Anglicky film vyznamenany Velkou cenou na MFF v Cannes", and "zvetsenina" at lower margin of section; (2)title and pictorial exegesis: at right, vertically- "BLOW UP", along top margin: "Rezie: Michelangelo Antonioni", and the images of a plan of a sports arena, the number one, as appearing on a referee's scorecard, the pointing finger and hand of a man in a suit and cufflinks as it would appear in cartoons, and a diagram or man-made abstraction; (3, 4, 5, 6)same image of a photograph, layered one over another, as in stop-motion animation, of a young man pulling a shirt out of a young woman's arms as she holds it against her chest; and (7)a photograph of a nude, photographed from a low frontal angle.

1962 World Ice Hockey Championships, The Broadmoor, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Bifoliate brochure providing information about the 1962 World Ice Hockey Championships at The Broadmoor World Arena, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Upper portion of front cover features three hockey sticks in white, purple, and red surrounding a green hockey puck at center against a blue background. Printed at upper right: 1962 World / Ice Hockey / Championships / THE BROADMOOR; "1962" and "THE BROADMOOR" are in green, while the rest of the text is purple. Printed in red, center right: March 8–18. Lower portion of front cover is white, with "INFORMATION" printed across the top in blue. Verso: Includes printed blue text about the locations of the championships (The Broadmoor Arena and the Denver University Arena), with a diagram below showing the route from Denver to Colorado Springs. A pattern consisting of white and blue triangles is at left, and the Broadmoor name and company logo (a small illustration of an arena) are printed in blue at bottom right. Interior contains printed purple text about the championships (including ticket reservations, hotel reservations, and transportation).

Study for The Investigation of the Rainbow, Plate 66, Physica Sacra

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A gentleman with a dog is surrounded by a small circular rainbow and faces a mountain with a cascading waterfall. The picture contains two large diagrams - the upper portion of the picture consists of two circles and diagonal lines, and the lower portion contains two arches and diagonal lines. The letters P and O appear in the upper portion, while Fig. 1 and the letters S and O appear below. The diagonal lines leading to the arches in the bottom portion are emanating from an eye that appears on the ground, just to the right of the man and his dog.

Ceiling border

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Stylized floral motif, set within corner gray band. Includes two diagrams for installing paper. Printed on white ground.

Embroidery

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Apron of red cotton, bordered with black band of cotton. One deep front pocket ornamented with applique in felt. Multi-colored silk embroidery showing YIN and YAN and the diagram found in the I-Ching, the book of Changes.

Monarch Sanctuary

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Supply List (Maine)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Leaf of sketchbook, which includes sketches in Maine. List: Packing chests / small sun umbrellas / draw shave / grub - shovel - nails. hatchet / saw-plane, chisel / hammer auger-gimlet[?] / wire - sheet tin / air tight stove & pipe & elbow[?] / light cups saucers plate &c. / Plated knives - mugs - forks / Butter dish. pepper box. Salts / wire andirons / heavy wide sheeting for / tents[?] - fancy goods for curtains / rings & heavy wire - / twine 3 sizes - / saucepans - tin / mattresses - pillows / Rubber boats and shoes / waterproof stuff - table, / covering / marmalade - dried fruits / turkey - corned beef - Bacon / Coffee - Tea - Chocolate / Confectionary - nuts - raisins / air cushions - / fishing tackle - gun - / Rugs - Curry - Spices / Camp stools / Students lamp. Candles / Lanterns of mica / Maple Sugar

Verso: Diagram of cabin

IABM Automatic Roll Systems

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Front page: The design features a logo in the top half of the page on the left; two crescent-shaped verticals are positioned on either side of a center section. The whole forms a not-quite-true circle, in which the outer rim and each segment within are outlined in black. Two additional lines are evenly spaced across, and one vertical line is in the center of the lower section. In the upper part of the center segment are three stylized red flames, shooting upward and gradually diminishing in size from left to right. The company name, IABM, in bold block capitals, abuts the bottom of the logo, followed underneath by Automatic/ Roll/ Systems, imprinted in heavy serif-style capitals. Immediately below, an illustration of an IABM prototype machine, in neutral tones outlined in black against a rust-toned wash slants diagonally upward to the right. In the lowest quarter of the page, one line in heavy serif-style type, Produces every popular type of roll, is followed directly underneath by a line of eleven names of rolls, imprinted in small capitals and separated by dots.

Inside pages, left and right: The design of each page illustrates machinery in the same style and color scheme as on the front; a one line heading in bright blue type in the same sans-serif type as on the front; and a diagram in black outline of the machinery, accompanied by a related chart of technical features in bright blue. At bottom, further charts and illustrations with headings in bright blue, CADO Cups (left) and Proofer Trays (right), complete the design.

Back page: A central illustration in rust-beige tones, centered on the page, depicts a variety of baked rolls. Underneath, centered, one line of type, For further information write or call, heads five lines of marketing information and a miniature black-and-white version of the logo.

From Turrets to Toilets: A Partial History of the Throne Room

Smithsonian Magazine

In a catalog assembled for the 2014 Venice Biennale to accompany an exhibition on architectural elements, the bathroom is referred to as “the architectural space in which bodies are replenished, inspected, and cultivated, and where one is left alone for private reflection - to develop and affirm identity.” I think that means it’s where you watch yourself crying in the mirror. As for the toilet specifically, Biennale curator Rem Koolhaas and his researchers, consider it to be the “ultimate” architectural element, “the fundamental zone of interaction--on the most intimate level--between humans and architecture.” So the next time that burrito doesn’t sit right or you had one too many gin and tonics, remember that you’re experiencing a corporeal union with the mother of all arts. Potty humor aside, the privatization and proliferation of the bathroom has really driven new developments in cleanliness and safety and has shaped our buildings.

The flush toilet was invented in 1596 but didn’t become widespread until 1851. Before that, the “toilet” was a motley collection of communal outhouses, chamber pots and holes in the ground. During the 11th-century castle-building boom, chamber pots were supplemented with toilets that were, for the first time, actually integrated into the architecture. These early bathrooms, known as “garderobes” were little more than continuous niches that ran vertically down to the ground, but they soon evolved into small rooms that protruded from castle walls as distinct bottomless bays (such a toilet was the setting for a pivotal scene in the season finale of "Game of Thrones"). “Garderrobe” is both a euphemism for a closet as well as a quite literal appellation, as historian Dan Snow notes: "The name garderobe - which translates as guarding one's robes - is thought to come from hanging your clothes in the toilet shaft, as the ammonia from the urine would kill the fleas."

 

(original image)

Though it might be named for a closet, the garderrobe actually had a strong resemblance to an aspect of a castle’s defenses. And it works in the same basic way: gravity. And while the garderobe was actually a weak spot in a castle’s defenses, woe be the unassuming invader scaling a castle wall beneath one. Several designs emerged to solve the problem of vertical waste disposal - some spiral up towers, for example, while some were entire towers; some dropped waste into cesspools, moats, and some just dropped it onto the ground below. Not all medieval compounds were okay with merely dumping excrement onto the ground like so much hot oil. Christchurch monastery (1167) has an elaborate sewage system that separates running water, rain drainage, and waste, which can be seen marked in red seen in the below drawing, which has to be the most beautiful plumbing diagram I have ever seen:

(original image)

Today, the toilet has been upgraded from architectural polyp to a central design element. A long time ago, when I had dreams of becoming an architect, I was designing a house for a client who wanted to see the television from the toilet and tub but did not want a television in the bathroom. The entire master suite, and thus a large percentage of the building’s second floor, was designed around seeing the views from the bathroom. And that was the second residence in my short career that began with the bathroom. More commonly though, toilets shape the spaces of our skyscrapers.

(original image)

Because we can’t simply drop our waste 800 feet off the side of a skyscraper onto a busy metropolitan sidewalk, and because efficient plumbing depends on stacking fixtures that share a common “wet wall,” toilets (and elevators, of course) are the only elements drawn in the plans for high-rise buildings, whose repeating floor slabs are built out later according to a tenant’s needs. Once relegated to the periphery, the toilet is a now an oasis at the center of our busylives, a place where, as Koolhaas wrote, “one is left alone for private reflection - to develop and affirm identity.” To paraphrase Winston Churchill, we shaped our toilets, then our toilet shapes us.

Pages 41–44 from Skyways

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Bifoliate print from Skyways magazine with pages 41–44. Front page features various cloud types against a blue background with printed text labels. At upper left: Cirrostratus; upper right, from top to bottom: Cirrus, Cirrocumulus, Altocumulus; center left: Stratocumulus; center right: Anviltop; lower left: Cumulus, Nimbostratus; lower right: Cumulonimbus, Stratus, Fog and Haze. Left interior page: Black printed text about the layers of the atmosphere at top and below, a circular illustration (predominantly in blue) of the different layers (troposphere, stratosphere, ionosphere) above the earth. Right interior page: Rectangular blue diagram of the different layers of the atmosphere, with small planes in black and balloons, meteors, lower aurora, and aurora borealis rendered in white. Miles above the geosphere are indicated in black along the left side. Verso/back page: At upper portion, a chart about air pressure featuring images and text about the need for oxygen masks with a blue background. Lower right: a black and white photographic reproduction of a man wearing an oxygen mask. Text about the oxygen mask printed in blue and white at lower left next to a blue circle. The page has a black background.

Exercise

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
On a black ground, in red ink across top: exercise / today the majority of us who work do so in a chair. And most of us are experiencing some adverse effects. The postural and vascular problems that are the result of this sedentary working life can be partially combated by choosing an ergonomically designed chair that permits / adjustment and frequent changes of posture. However, medical research has shown that no seated position is good when maintained for long periods of time. These exercises can be performed while seated and will help stimulate circulation and regenerate muscular elasticity.

Nine diagrams of figure--outline of figure in orange, red, and yellow--exercising in chair accompanied by instructions imprinted in white ink: Occasionally elevate your legs horizontally to the thighs. / Flex, stretch, and move your body while vigorously using the chair’s rocking motion. / Lift your knees and angle them toward your body. / Pump your feet to increase the blood flow from the legs to the trunk. / Elongate your torso and raise your arms in a full stretch position. / Contract your calf muscles by moving your feet back and forth while sitting. / Tiptoe while seated, using the chair’s rocking motion. / Rotate your head and tilt forward and backward to exercise your neck vertebrae. / If your work requires you to sit for uninterrupted periods of more than thirty minutes, get up / and stand – or even better, walk around – for a few minutes.

Bostwick Gate Company Collection, 1900-1905

Smithsonian Libraries
Also available online.

CHMRB copy 39088017560277 has bookplate: Smithsonian Institution Libraries. Purchased from the Special Collections Endowment.

CHMRB copy is housed in a later plastic box measuring 26 x 34 cm.

CHMRB copy 39088017560277 has bookplate: Smithsonian Libraries Adopt-a-Book program. Adopted by Tim & Patricia Schantz in honor of Judy & Bob Schantz on November 7, 2017.

Elecresource

Collection of items pertaining to the Bostwick Gate Company (also known as the Bostwick Gate & Shutter Company) of London, England. Includes an oblong printed catalog with contemporary blue cloth cover: The Bostwick Co.'s catalogue of wrot [i.e. wrought] iron & art metal work [London? : the Company, 1903]; an identification card ("carte de service") for Bostwick Gate Company exhibition representative Alfred Clark at the Exposition universelle internationale 1900, including a photographic portrait of Clark with the form completed by hand; two photographic prints (15 x 21 cm.) showing different angles of a decorative metalwork arched gate topper; a United States patent for a collapsible gate, no. 786,951, awarded to Alfred Clark of London, England and dated 11 April 1905, including two text leaves and 3 leaves of diagrams; and a working scale model of a collapsible brass gate (15 x 9 cm. folding to 15 x 3 cm.).

Samples and charts

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Two weave diagrams and one drawing of doublecloth cross section and two woven textile samples, all attached to a piece of cardboard. One sample (a) is doublecloth in red and white cotton and the other is double faced plain weave and twill in tan, yellow, brown and white.

Manuscripts and notes from Ethel Chase

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
a) Original drafts: major binder of diagrams. b) Working drafts: study for "a." c) Photostats of "a" State 1 – 2 copies. d) Photostats of "b" State. e) Scribblings and notes for manuscript. f) "Weaving." g) "Damask and Double Faced Twill" Breeze h) One ledger of positive photostats

Pages 41–44 from Skyways

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Bifoliate print from Skyways magazine with pages 41–44. Front page features various cloud types against a blue background with printed text labels. At upper left: Cirrostratus; upper right, from top to bottom: Cirrus, Cirrocumulus, Altocumulus; center left: Stratocumulus; center right: Anviltop; lower left: Cumulus, Nimbostratus; lower right: Cumulonimbus, Stratus, Fog and Haze. Left interior page: Black printed text about the layers of the atmosphere at top and below, a circular illustration (predominantly in blue) of the different layers (troposphere, stratosphere, ionosphere) above the earth. Right interior page: Rectangular blue diagram of the different layers of the atmosphere, with small planes in black and balloons, meteors, lower aurora, and aurora borealis rendered in white. Miles above the geosphere are indicated in black along the left side. Verso/back page: At upper portion, a chart about air pressure featuring images and text about the need for oxygen masks with a blue background. Lower right: a black and white photographic reproduction of a man wearing an oxygen mask. Text about the oxygen mask printed in blue and white at lower left next to a blue circle. The page has a black background.

Memorandum of Agreement [specifications for a locomotive steam engine]

Smithsonian Libraries
Smithsonian Institution Libraries. Manuscripts of the Dibner collection, 710

Also available online

Also available online.

Collected by Bern Dibner for his Burndy Library in Norwalk, Connecticut, founded in 1941. Donated to the Smithsonian Libraries in 1974 by Dibner DSI

Elecresource

D.S. Memorandum of Agreement from Fenton, Murray & Jackson, engineers of Leeds, to William C. Molyneux, merchant of Liverpool, concerning the specifications for a locomotive steam engine. Written on 1833 Aug. 1, the document was signed by Jackson on 1833 Aug. 3. Also added then to the same page is a letter to Molyneux, referring to the diagram, etc., and signed by J. M. Dickinson

Crosby Steam Engine Indicator, ca 1930

National Museum of American History
An engine indicator is an instrument for graphically recording the pressure versus piston displacement through an engine stroke cycle. Engineers use the resulting diagram to check the design and performance of the engine. Manufactured by Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co. of Boston, Massachusetts, this steam engine indicator is enclosed in a wooden case. It consists of a steel piston; an interchangeable external, helical wound spring; a large single recording drum with a spiral spring; and a brass stylus. The piston causes the stylus to rise and fall with pressure changes in the engine under measurement thereby directly recording the indicator’s output on the paper. Around the drum’s base is wound a cord that is attached to the connecting rod of the piston on the steam engine being measured. This causes the drum to rotate as the engine’s piston moves. An internal coil spring causes the cord to retract and the drum to counter rotate back to its original position as the connecting rod returns. The result is a steam pressure-volume diagram which is used to measure the efficiency and other attributes of the steam engine. This indicator differs from other models in that it has provisions for making more than a single pressure-volume diagram. It can use an alternate recording drum that holds a roll of recording paper which is unwound as measurements proceed. The resulting series of pressure-volume diagrams allow comparison of engine performance over time and as load and other conditions change. The continuous recording mechanism was patented in 1907 and assigned to the Crosby Company.

The introduction of the steam indicator in the late 1790s and early 1800s by James Watt and others had a great impact on the understanding of how the steam behaved inside the engine's cylinder and thereby enabled much more exacting and sophisticated designs. The devices also changed how the economics and efficiency of steam engines were portrayed and marketed. They helped the prospective owner of a machine better understand how much his fuel costs would be for a given amount of work performed. Measurement of fuel consumed and work delivered by the engine was begun by Watt, who in part justified the selling price of his engines on the amount of fuel cost the purchaser might save compared to an alternate engine. In the early days of steam power, the method to compare engine performance was based on a concept termed the engine’s “duty”. It originally was calculated as the number of pounds of water raised one foot high per one bushel of coal consumed. The duty method was open to criticism due to its inability to take into consideration finer points of efficiency in real world applications of engines . Accurate determination of fuel used in relation to work performed has been fundamental to the design and improvement of all steam-driven prime movers ever since Watt’s time. And, the steam indicators’ key contribution was the accurate measurements of performance while the engine was actually doing the work it was designed to do. This Crosby steam indicator represented over one hundred years of evolution and improvement of the devices. Its ability to make continuous recordings was a significant improvement for many applications.

Outer Space & Underwear

Smithsonian Institution

In the Venn diagram of life, it’s hard to imagine what spacecraft and women’s underwear might have in common. And that’s probably what NASA engineers thought back in 1962 when they asked a handful of companies to design a spacesuit that would keep a man alive and mobile on the moon. Nobody counted on the International Latex Corporation, whose commercial brand, Playtex, was known for its bras and girdles. But lingerie, and the expert seamstresses who sewed it, played a critical role in those first well-supported steps on the moon.

Dinner book, vol. II

Archives of American Art
Diary : 1 v. : handwritten ; 19 x 12 cm. Only one selected page has been scanned: a table seating diagram for the 1895 Dec. 25 dinner diagram at the Biltmore estate.
Citation of this item must include the following title designated by the donor: Whitney Museum of American Art, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers. Gift of Flora Miller Irving.

Knitting

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Pattern with motif of enlarged stockinette knitting stitch diagram; color scheme of brown on cream ground.

Sample book

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Weaver's sample book with hand woven samples and diagrams. Samples are mostly geometrical in pattern. Executed by the husband of the donor.
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