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American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 7 - Artists Travel to Africa

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Chair: Tanya Sheehan, Associate Professor of Art, Colby College Anne-Grit Becker, PhD Candidate in Art History, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany "Toward a Language of Material: Cy Twombly's North African Sketchbooks" Chika Okeke-Agulu, Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Art, Princeton University "Living in Color: Jacob Lawrence and the Osogbo Experience in the Early 1960s" Peju Layiwola, Associate Professor of Art and Art History, University of Lagos, Nigeria "Transcultural Conversations: American and Nigerian Art in Dialogue"

Shifting Terrain: Mapping a Transnational American Art History (Friday, October 16 - Session 1)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
9:30–9:45 a.m., Welcome Elizabeth Broun, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director, Smithsonian American Art Museum Elizabeth Glassman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Terra Foundation for American Art 9:45–10:15 a.m., Introduction Cécile Whiting, Chancellor’s Professor of Art History and Professor of Visual Studies, University of California, Irvine “The Transnational Turn in American Art History” 10:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m., Things Chair: Jennifer L. Roberts, Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, Harvard University Jennifer Van Horn, Assistant Professor of Art History, George Mason University “Re-membering War: Prostheses and Citizenship in Revolutionary America” Jennifer Jane Marshall, Associate Professor of North American Art, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities “Nashville, New York, Paris, and Nashville: William Edmondson, Mobilized and Unmoved” -Ethan W. Lasser, Theodore E. Stebbins, Jr. Curator of American Art and Head of the Division of European and American Art, Harvard Art Museums “The End of the ‘American Gallery’: Integrated Collections and the Future of American Art History”

Shifting Terrain: Mapping a Transnational American Art History (Saturday, October 17 - Session 4)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m., Networks Chair: Vanessa R. Schwartz, Professor of History, Art History, and Film and Director of the Visual Studies Research Institute, University of Southern California Estelle Blaschke, Researcher, Université de Lausanne “Creating Infrastructures: The Rise and Imaginary of Microfilm, 1920–1950” Nadya Bair, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, University of Southern California “New York, Paris, and the World: American Sponsorship and Magnum Photos’ Global Network” Fred Turner, Professor of Communication, Stanford University “The Democratic Surround and the Politics of Multimedia”

John Edward Hasse - Smithsonian American Art - Luce Center - Pop-up Piano Recital

Smithsonian American Art Museum
National Museum of American History Curator and Ellington biographer John Edward Hasse plays a program of blues and jazz piano, in celebration of Jazz Appreciation Month, which he founded. 0:04 Saint Louis Blues - W.C. Handy 3:38 Summertime - George Gershwin 9:06 How Long, How Long Blues - Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell 12:22 Don't Get Around Much Anymore / Satin Doll - Duke Ellington 16:24 Autumn Leaves - Joseph Kosma 20:24 Watermelon Man - Herbie Hancock Visit us at http://americanart.si.edu

American Art in a Global Context: Looking for the Big Picture

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Symposium: "American Art in a Global Context" Thursday, September 28, 2006 Session I: Looking for the Big Picture Introduction: Cynthia Mills, Smithsonian American Art Museum Moderator: Wanda M. Corn, Stanford University Presenters: Angela Miller, Washington University, "The Global Turn in American Art" Winfried Fluck, Freie Universität Berlin, "Narratives about American Art: A View from Abroad" Chon Noriega, University of California, Los Angeles, "A Ver: Revisioning Art History" Margo Machida, University of Connecticut, "The Global Within: Dialogism and Asian American Art" This three-day symposium looked at American art in a global context—from circum-Atlantic migrations in the eighteenth century to European training and travel in the late nineteenth century; from the export of U.S. culture and media in the twentieth century to the impact of immigration and globalization on the nation's visual arts in the new millennium. For more information: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2006/.

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Elizabeth Broun and Alexandra Munroe

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Welcome, Elizabeth Broun, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director, American Art Museum Alexandra Munroe, senior curator of Asian Art, Guggenheim Museum "Reflections on The Third Mind: Topics for Intellectual Inquiry" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/.

Eric Fischl - Clarice Smith Distinguished Lecture Series, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Eric Fischl is an internationally acclaimed American painter and sculptor and is considered one of the most important figurative artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Fischl’s paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints have been the subject of numerous solo and major group exhibitions and his work is represented in many museums, as well as prestigious private and corporate collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modem Art in New York City, The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, St. Louis Art Museum, Louisiana Museum of Art in Denmark, Musée Beaubourg in Paris, The Paine Weber Collection, and many others. Eric Fischl is a Fellow at both the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Science. He lives and works in Sag Harbor, NY with his wife, the painter April Gornik.

Jerry Saltz - Clarice Smith Distinguished Lecture Series - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Since 2007, Jerry Saltz has been the Senior Art Critic for New York Magazine. Before that, starting in 1998, he was Senior Art Critic for the Village Voice. He is a two-time Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Criticism and has had two volumes of criticism published. The 2007 winner of the Frank Jewett Mather Award in Art Criticism from the College Art Association, he has lectured widely including at Harvard, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and many others. He has taught at Columbia University, Yale, RISD, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, among many others. In addition to having written for Frieze, Parkett, Art in America, and many other publications, he was recently ranked #57 “Most Powerful Person in the Art World” by ArtReview Magazine—one ahead of Jasper Johns. This talk is part of the American Art Museum’s annual speaker series, the Clarice Smith Distinguished Lectures in American Art.

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Franklin Odo and Patricia Johnston

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Welcome, Franklin Odo, director, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program Patricia Johnston, professor of art history, Salem State College "Global Knowledge in the Early Republic: The Circulation and Display of Objects from the East Indies and China Trades" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Cynthia Mills and Jenni Sorkin

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Jenni Sorkin, Ph.D. candidate, History of Art Department, Yale University "Zen Pottery and Avant-Garde Ideals: The Pottery Seminar at Black Mountain College, 1952" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

The American Art Works

National Museum of American History

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 8 - Reframing the Traditional/Historical

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Chair: Kelly Quinn, Terra Foundation Project Manager for Scholarly and Educational Initiatives, Archives of American Art Celeste-Marie Bernier, Professor of African American Studies, University of Nottingham "Imaging the 'Face of the Fugitive Slave' Artist in Black Diasporic Self-Portraiture" Venny Nakazibwe, Dean of The Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda "African Textiles in Dialogue with Contemporary Fiber Art" Featuring the video "Willis 'Bing' Davis: On the Shoulders of Those Who Came Before." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGoeALg1OgU Daniel Haxall, Associate Professor of Art History, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania "In the Spirit of Négritude, or, Kehinde Wiley Goes to Africa"

Shifting Terrain: Mapping a Transnational American Art History (Saturday, October 17 - Session 5)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
1:30–2:45 p.m., Graduate Student Lightning Round Moderator: Amelia Goerlitz, Fellowship and Academic Programs Manager, Smithsonian American Art Museum Emily Casey, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, University of Delaware “Finding the Early American Republic at Sea” Elisabeth Otto, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, Université de Montréal “Northwest Coast Cubism: Emily Carr and Mark Tobey, 1928” Davide Nerini, Ph.D. Student in the History of Culture, Université de Lausanne “Disseminating Lots of Photographs: Paul Vanderbilt and the Microfilming Project of the FSA-OWI Collection at the Library of Congress, 1942–1946” Ellie Armon Azoulay, M.Res. Student in Exhibition Studies, University of the Arts London, Central Saint Martin “Edith Gregor Halpert: What’s Wrong with This Picture?” Sandra Salles, Ph.D. Student in Art History, Universidade Estadual de Campinas “Melvin Edwards’s Lynch Fragments from an Afro-Brazilian Perspective” 2:45–3:15 p.m., Coffee Break

July 4th: The American Experience in American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailTomorrow is the 4th of July! And in today’s technological age it has become almost traditional on social media to post holiday specific imagery in celebration of special days. Here at American Art we definitely have no shortage of American imagery that reflects our experiences as a people. Many of the incredible works in the collection are imbued with a sense of American pride and celebrate the American spirit. How can we possibly pick just one to share?

Art Signs - Introduction

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Art Signs Video Series Introduction Presenter Tabitha Jacques Art Signs, the Smithsonian American Art Museum's monthly program, features 30-minute gallery talks presented by deaf gallery guides in American Sign Language (ASL). ASL interpreters voice information and observations allowing hearing and deaf audiences to discover art together under the leadership of a deaf volunteer guide. For more information: http://americanart.si.edu/education/asl/

Art Signs - Café

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"Café" by William H. Johnson, ca 1939-40 Presented by Tracey Salaway Art Signs, the Smithsonian American Art Museum's monthly program, features 30-minute gallery talks presented by deaf gallery guides in American Sign Language (ASL). ASL interpreters voice information and observations allowing hearing and deaf audiences to discover art together under the leadership of a deaf volunteer guide. For more information: http://americanart.si.edu/education/asl/

Art Signs - Subway

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"Subway" by Lily Furedi, 1934 Presented by Taye Akinola Art Signs, the Smithsonian American Art Museum's monthly program, features 30-minute gallery talks presented by deaf gallery guides in American Sign Language (ASL). ASL interpreters voice information and observations allowing hearing and deaf audiences to discover art together under the leadership of a deaf volunteer guide. For more information: http://americanart.si.edu/education/asl/

Art Signs - Monekana

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"Monekana" by Deborah Butterfield, 2001 Presented by Tabitha Jacques Art Signs, the Smithsonian American Art Museum's monthly program, features 30-minute gallery talks presented by deaf gallery guides in American Sign Language (ASL). ASL interpreters voice information and observations allowing hearing and deaf audiences to discover art together under the leadership of a deaf volunteer guide. For more information: http://americanart.si.edu/education/asl/

Teacher Institutes "The Coming Storm: The Civil War and American Art" with Eleanor Jones Harvey

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Keynote Address, Clarice Smith National Teacher Institute The Coming Storm: The Civil War and American Art with Eleanor Jones Harvey July 2012 http://americanart.si.edu/

Teacher Instititues "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" with curator E. Carmen Ramos

Smithsonian American Art Museum
E. Carmen Ramos, Ph.D, Curator of Latino Art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, delivers the keynote address at the 2013 Clarice Smith National Teacher Institutes, introducing her major exhibition, Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art. Ramos examines how Latino artists participated in and shaped artistic movements from the mid-twentieth century on and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. The Clarice Smith American Art Education Initiative is supported by a generous gift from the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation.

Archives of American Art sound recordings, 1957-1979

Archives of American Art
15 Sound tape reels; 7 in. +

Recordings of Archives of American Art (AAA) sponsored events.

Included are: AAA benefit dinner, 1957, with speakers Al Capp, Irving Burton, and E.P. (Edgar Preston) Richardson; a steering committee meeting of the AAA, May 27 and June 12, 1959 (partially transcribed 5 pages); a conference, March 1961; a seminar, April 6-7, 1962; and a lecture (7 pages) delivered by E.P. Richardson at the annual meeting of held at the Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan, February 2, 1962. Also included are the proceedings of AAA's twenty-fifth anniversary dinner held in Washington, D.C., November 8, 1979. Speakers include S. Dillon Ripley, Gilbert Kinney, W. E. Woolfenden and Eloise Spaeth.

Conservation of Folk Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Conservation of Folk Art Lecture

Art Signs - Sunflower III

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"Sunflower III" by Joan Mitchell, 1969 Presented by Tracey Salaway Art Signs, the Smithsonian American Art Museum's monthly program, features 30-minute gallery talks presented by deaf gallery guides in American Sign Language (ASL). ASL interpreters voice information and observations allowing hearing and deaf audiences to discover art together under the leadership of a deaf volunteer guide. For more information: http://americanart.si.edu/education/asl/
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