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Found 6,910 Collections

 

Living and Working in Space

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go into space? How about living and working in there? In this program we will explore those questions as well as the benefits and challenges of living and working in space.

May 20, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
17
 

Time and Navigation

If you want to know where you are, you need a good clock. For centuries sailors have used clocks to locate where they are out at sea. Today we use synchronized clocks and orbiting satellites for location. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll take a look at the challenges of navigating at sea, in the sky, and even in space.

August 26, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Asteroid Redirect Mission

In orbit around the Sun are thousands of asteroids ranging in size from grains of sand to miles across. NASA is planning a mission to capture a piece of an asteroid to be studied by NASA scientists and astronauts. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will learn about asteroids, what we can learn from capturing one, and the technology needed to accomplish such a mission.

September 23, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

ISS: 15 Years of Continuous Human Presence

In the lifetime of today's middle school students, there hasn't been a day without a human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS). This episode of STEM in 30 celebrates the 15th anniversary of continuous occupation of the space station and looks at the incredible accomplishments of the last 15 years.

November 18, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Milestones of Flight: The Lindberghs

Charles Lindbergh is probably best known for making the first solo flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis. However, Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, also reached other milestones in aviation. In 1929 they purchased a Lockheed Sirius airplane and flew it to Asia, proving the viability of traveling from the West to the Far East via the Great Circle route to the north. During a trip through Greenland, a native boy gave the Sirius its nickname: Tingmissartoq, meaning "one who flies like a big bird." This episode of STEM in 30 will explore the Lindberghs' aviation-related accomplishments.

January 27, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
12
 

WWII and Tuskegee Airmen

Before 1941, there weren't any African American pilots in the United States armed forces. The Tuskegee Airmen changed that. With the United States' entry into World War II imminent, the U.S. Army Air Corps (the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force) decided to offer training to African Americans as pilots and mechanics. Called the Tuskegee Airmen because they trained in Tuskegee, Alabama, these airmen made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American military. This episode of STEM in 30 will look at the role African Americans played during the war and how World War II changed aviation history

February 24, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Mars Rovers

There are two separate rovers traversing Mars right this instant. It took many people and thousands of parts (many of them made of titanium) to build these rovers. In this episode of STEM in 30, we explore the construction of the Mars rovers as well as the science that is being done 140 million miles away on the Red Planet.

March 30, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Space Junk: Fast Trash

We think of outer space as pretty empty, but that's not the case around planet Earth. There are millions of pieces of man-made debris floating around. This debris causes potential problems for astronauts, satellites, and other important pieces of equipment circling Earth. This fast-paced webcast will look at what's out there and how NASA keeps an eye on it.

February 18, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
33
 

Lighter, Stronger, Better: Composites

What makes the Boeing 787 Dreamliner so dreamy? Composites. These engineered materials allow aircraft to be lighter and stronger. Explore composites in this fast-paced webcast: learn what they are, how they are made and how they are used in the aerospace industry.

January 28, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Diamonds in the Sky: Stars and Exoplanets

Twinkle, twinkle little...wait a minute, is that a star or something else, and just how "little" is it? What are you actually looking at when you gaze up at the night sky? This is a question that scientists have been wondering for generations. In this episode we will take a look at the night sky observing the stars, planets and exoplanets.

National Air and Space Museum
20
 

Spy Planes: Eyes in the Sky

Quick name some famous spies! Who did you come up with? Jack Ryan? James Bond? Movie spies are fun and resourceful, but real life spies rely on a lot more than fancy gadgets and powerful informants. Real spies need as much information as they can get. In this episode we visit the CIA headquarters to discover how spies gather and interpret intelligence and the specialized planes, cameras and codes they need to do so. We also visit the International Spy Museum to put what we learn to the test.

National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Buzz the Tower: How Bees Influence Aviation

Bees are important to the environment, but did you know they are also important for the aerospace industry? This episode is buzzing with bees as we discuss the flying insects and explore research being done on them. You will also see how the honeycomb structure is used in the aerospace

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

World War I: Legacy, Letters, and Belgian War Lace

In this STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, math) inspired STEM in 30, we will look at some of the technological advances of World War I that solidified the airplane's legacy as a fighting machine. In conjunction with the Embassy of Belgium, we'll also dive deep into how the war affected the lives of children in an occupied country and how lace makers helped feed a nation. The episode will also look at present works of art by artist soldiers on display in the Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War exhibition.

April 26, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
24
 

Solar Eclipse Special: Live from the Path of Totality

A total solar eclipse will sweep across America on August 21, 2017. Tune in to STEM in 30 as we celebrate the Great American Eclipse live from Liberty, Missouri, which is on the Path of Totality. This means that the total solar eclipse will be viewable, weather permitting, and we’ll be there to show it as it happens. We will also be live from the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC, answering FAQs about eclipses.

August 21, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

We Choose to go to the Moon. . .

One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind, but in order to take those small steps, it took thousands of people from around the country to develop the tools and technology that got us to the Moon and back. In this episode of STEM in 30 learn about why we went to the Moon, what we accomplished, and what's next.

October 1, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
15
 

Taking the Fast Lane to Orbit: The Technology of Rockets and Race Cars

Many of the technologies used in NASCAR are the same as those used in space travel, and many of the forces that keep a plane in the air also keep a racecar on the road. Join us as we broadcast STEM in 30 live from the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, North Carolina and look at the crossover between these forces and technologies.

February 22, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
19
 

The Biology of Long Term Spaceflight

Since the first humans launched into space in 1961, there have been questions about how the human body would react to being beyond Earth's atmosphere. While most of the basic questions have been answered, many remain, and are the basis for continued research on the International Space Station. Finding answers to these questions is an important step toward sending humans to Mars. Join STEM in 30 as we explore this research and the impact of long-term space travel on the human body.

January 25, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Star Trek at 50: Science Fiction to Science Fact

50 years ago this September, one of the most popular shows in the history of television premiered. Star Trek has inspired generations of scientists, astronauts, and engineers, and introduced many technologies that have gone from science fiction to science reality. Boldly go on a voyage with STEM in 30 as we explore the Star Trek universe, including the studio model of the starship Enterprise on display in our Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall.

September 14, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
26
 

Building a Better Mousetrap and Inventing the Airplane: All About Patents

Have you ever had a really great science fair project? Have you invented something? Have you had an idea that would be a great help to you or someone else? If so, you need to learn about patents. Patents help protect unique ideas, like the mousetrap. On this episode of STEM in 30, learn about patents, and how they are used.

September 20, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
14
 

The Psychology of Long Term Space Flight Music, Art and Creature Comforts

If you've ever taken a long trip, you know that bringing your favorite things along will help get you through the journey. The same goes for astronauts in space. Music and the arts entertain them and give them a chance to break away from their demanding schedules. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll dive into how music, art, and creature comforts helps astronauts cope with long-term space travel.

Novermber 1, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Meet Orion and SLS, America's Next Great Spacecraft

How are we going to get astronauts to Mars and back safely? How many crew will be making this trip? And how big will this rocket have to be? We will answer these questions and many more as STEM in 30 looks at the Orion, a spacecraft built to take humans farther than they have ever gone before.

November 15, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
16
 

The Airplane's Family Tree: From the Wright Brothers to Today

Did you know that the parts of airplanes today can be traced directly back to the Wright Flyer and the work of Orville and Wilbur Wright? Join STEM in 30 as we trace the family tree of the airplane from that first flight on December 17, 1903, to today.

December 13, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
16
 

What Training Do I Need to Be an Astronaut?

Did you know that training for a spacewalk requires a 6.5 million gallon swimming pool, a team of divers, and a mock-up of the International Space Station? Astronauts have to train for a variety of different jobs they have to do in low Earth orbit. Once on the station, astronauts run science experiments (sometimes on themselves), fix toilets, and run the robotic arm. Do you think you have what takes to complete astronaut training? Find out on this STEM in 30.

February 28, 2018

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

Staying Safe is No Accident: The Science of Safety

Do you feel safe when you travel in a car or plane? A lot of engineering and science goes into making sure that the vehicles we use every day are safe and secure. Join STEM in 30 as we take a look at the science of safety.

March 14, 2018

National Air and Space Museum
16
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