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“The Battle Song of Liberty”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “The Battle Song of Liberty” whose music was composed by F.E. Bigelow and whose lyrics were written by Jack Yellen. The Walter Jacobs Company of Boston, Massachusetts published this sheet music in 1917. The cover features scenes of war, with battleships sailing and airplanes flying around explosions, and the specter of soldiers marching in file in the sky. The foreground features an illustrated image of the Statue of Liberty, and Starmer signed the cover in the lower right.

“The Band Played On”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “The Band Played On.” Charles P. Ward composed the music for the song and John F. Palmer wrote the lyrics. The Calumet Music Company of Chicago, Illinois published this sheet music in 1936. The black and yellow cover has a black and white image of a man and woman dancing closely. The song’s lyrics described how “Casey would waltz with a strawberry blonde as the band played on.”

“That's the Tune They Play in Dixie Land”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “That's the Tune They Play in Dixie Land.” The lyrics were written by Joseph Mittenthal and the music was composed by Joseph M. Daly. The sheet music was published by the Joseph M. Daly Company of Boston, Massachusetts in 1908. The cover features a blue-tinged illustration of a man at a pier looking at battleships sailing in the bay. There is an inset photograph of Ben F. Loring on the lower right of the cover, who would have featured and performed the song in his act.

“That Naughty Waltz”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “That Naughty Waltz” that was written by Edwin Stanley and composed by Sol. P. Levy. The sheet music was published by The Forster Music Publisher Inc. of Chicago, Illinois in 1920. The music was originally published by Belwin Inc. The cover features an image of several dancing couples in front of an orange semi-circle with various sizes of purple and orange Chinese lamps above them. The artwork is signed by Helen Van Doorn Morgan.

“That International Rag”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song “That International Rag” was composed by Irving Berlin, and published by the Waterson, Berlin, and Snyder Company in New York, New York, in 1913. “That International Rag,” was composed by Berlin on his tour to England. After a disastrous press conference where Berlin gave the false impression he had no musical talent, he composed this tune overnight, and played it to great success the next day at London’s Hippodrome. The cover shows Uncle Sam conducting a choir of various nationalities in the tune, with an inset image of actress Goldie Moore.

“That Good Old Country Town”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “That Good Old Country Town (Where I was Born)” that was written and composed by Carson J. Robison, and published by the Triangle Music Publishing Company in 1928. The song was featured by Vernon Dalhart, and the plain white cover has a photograph of Dalhart and Carson Robison on the cover. The cover notes that the music was a “Joe Davis” Publication. Davis operated the Triangle Music Publishing Company, and also pursued a career as a recording artist.

“Tenting on the Old Campground”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Tenting on the Old Campground.” The song was written and composed by Walter Kittredge and published by Oliver Ditson & Co. in 1864. The tune was adapted and sung by the Hutchinson Family Tribe of Asa. The Hutchinson Family was a popular singing group during the Civil War who split into two ensembles, the Tribe of Jesse and Tribe of Asa and often performed songs promoting abolition, temperance, and women’s rights.

“Tell Me Little Gypsy”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Tell Me Little Gypsy” from Ziegfeld Follies 1920 revue. The song was written and composed by Irving Berlin, and the number was staged by Edward Royce in its performance. The sheet music was published by Irving Berlin Inc. of New York City in 1920. Ziegfeld’s Follies was an annual revue put on by Broadway producer Florenz Ziegfeld that featured multiple song and dance numbers by numerous stars of the time.

“Teasing”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song “Teasing” was written by Cecil Mack, and composed by Albert Von Tilzer. It was published by the York Music Company that was managed by Albert Von Tilzer, in New York, New York in 1904. The cover features a pencil drawn image of a girl with a coquettish look on her face, reflecting the song’s lyrics about a girl upsetting her “feller” by making eyes at other guys, even though she was just teasing. The cover also features an inset portrait of Libby Arnold Blondell, a vaudeville actress at the time.

“Tapster” for Opening Beer Cans

National Museum of American History
This unusual metal object, shaped like a small pitcher with a lid, becomes even more curious when the lid is raised and a sharp can opener is revealed in the lid’s underside. Called the “Tapster,” this device was made by Revere Copper and Brass, Inc., in Rome, New York, probably around 1934, after the repeal of Prohibition. Although it was never used extensively, the Tapster did offer consumers a somewhat refined way of serving canned beer: a can of beer is placed inside the device and, when the lid is closed, the opener pierces the can. The beer can then be poured out of the spout.

As its name implies, Revere Copper and Brass was the direct descendant of the company founded by Paul Revere in 1801. Through its long history, the company has manufactured a variety of copper, brass, and stainless steel products. As of 2015, the company is still in business under the name Revere Copper Products, with headquarters in Rome, NY.

This “Tapster” opener is part of a large collection of brewing material donated to the museum in 1967 by former brewmaster Walter Voigt, of Ruxton, Maryland, near Baltimore. Voigt’s collection consists of objects and archival materials reflecting the history of brewing in the mid-Atlantic region between 1870 and the beginnings of consolidation and large-scale, industrial production in the 1960s. His correspondence reveals an interest in preserving the history of brewing in America before brewmasters were “replaced by chemical engineers and highly trained chemists in modern laboratories.” Voigt’s papers are housed in the museum’s Archives Center, Collection #ACNMAH 1195, “Walter H. Voigt Brewing Industry Collection, 1935-1967.”

“Tammany”

National Museum of American History
The sheet music for the song “Tammany” was written by Vincent Bryan and composed by Gus Edwards. It was published by M. Witmark and Sons in New York, New York in 1905. Written as an Indian spoof, the song was composed for an event held by the National Democratic Club of New York and was very well received at the event. The cover notes that it was sung with great success by Jefferson DeAngelis, and features a portrait photograph of noted vaudeville performer DeAngelis on the lower left corner of the cover.

“Talk About Eyes!”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song "Talk About Eyes!" was written by Bobby Heath and composed by Gus Benkhart. The music was published by Thomas J. Kennedy of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1910. The cover features an illustration of a girl's face with a very flirty look, and a flower design on the right.

“Taking a Chance on Love”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Taking a Chance on Love” from the musical “Cabin in the Sky.” John Latouche and Ted Fetter wrote the lyrics to the song and Vernon Duke composed the music. The sheet music was published by Leo Feist Inc. of New York City in 1940. The cover features an illustration of an ethereal cabin floating on a cloud. “Cabin in the Sky” was originally staged as a play in 1940, before being turned into a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film in 1943.

“Take Your Time”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for “Take Your Time” was written by Joe Young and composed by Oscar Levant. The sheet music was published by the Jerry Vogel Music Company Inc., of New York, New York in 1936. The cover has a solid red background with a black and white clock, where the numbers are replaced by images of transportation. The cover is overlaid with a photo of Ken Sparnon, and the logo of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers in the bottom right.

“Take Me Out to the Ballgame”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.” Jack Norworth wrote the lyrics and Albert Von Tilzer composed the music to the song. The sheet music was published by the York Music Company of New York City in 1908. The cover has an illustration of a baseball in the background, with an illustration of a cheering crowd below. There is an inset photograph of Maude Gray on the right side of the cover.

“Tackin' 'Em Down”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song "Tackin' 'Em Down" was written by Bud De Sylva and composed by Albert Gumble. The music was published by Remick and Co. of New York, New York in 1908. The cover features an illustration of a man and woman dancing in a striped wallpapered room. The song “Tackin’ ‘em Down” taught a new dance of the same name, where “at first you hold your sweetie tight, and eagle rock with all your might, and then you stamp your heels in time with the melody, that’s called “tackin’ ‘em down.”

“Symphony”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Symphony” that was written by Andre Tabet and Roger Bernstein, with an American version by Jack Lawrence. Alex Alstone composed the music to the song. Chappell & Company, Inc. of New York City published this sheet music in 1955. The pale blue and white cover has an inset photograph of Johnny Desmond, a popular singer and recording artists during the 1940s and 1950s.

“Swim the Channel”

National Museum of American History
The sheet music for the song “Swim the Channel” was written and composed C. Dalziel, and published by Dix Lt. of London, England in 1926. In 1926, Gertrude Ederle was the first woman to swim the English Channel but three weeks later Amelia “Millie” Gade Corson became the first mother to swim the channel in 15 hours and 29 minutes. This song seems to be dedicated to Corson rather than Ederle, but both woman received admiration from Tin Pan Alley in the form of songs.

“Sweetheart Tell Me Again”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song “Sweetheart Tell Me Again” was written by George Cooper and composed by C. F. Shattuck. The music was published by the Oliver Ditson Co. of New York, New York in 1902, and appeared as a supplement to the “New York Herald” on March 1, 1903. The cover features an illustration of a couple sitting on a bench under the trees and the stars. The image is inside a frame that has the outline similar to a piece of a jigsaw puzzle.

“Sweet Violets”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song “Sweet Violets” was written and composed by J. K. Emmet and published by John Church and Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio in 1882. The cover totes this music as the “only correct and authorized edition.” The song “Sweet Violets” came from Emmet’s play, “Fritz among the Gypsies,” and was a humorous, “censored rhyme” song where the last word of a couplet that could be inferred to be crude because of the rhyming scheme, was left off and the next couplet sung.

“Sweet Red Roses”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song “Sweet Red Roses” was written by Effie Genee and composed by R. M. Stults. The music was originally published by William A. Pond and Co. of New York, New York in 1900, but this sheet music was published as a supplement to the New York Herald on June 7, 1903. The cover features an image of roses in a vase. Newspapers would often include these supplements in their Sunday editions to boost sales because of the popularity of sheet music during this time.

“Sweet Memories”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music for the song "Sweet Memories" was composed by C. Don Alberto and published by the Shapiro Publishing Co. of New York, New York in 1909. The cover has a photograph of Jane Elton in middle of cover. The cover has an illustration drawn by William Starmer of two floral bouquets flanking the photograph in the center of the cover.

“Sweet Mandy”

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Sweet Mandy” that was written and composed by Al Bernard. The sheet music was published by the Triangle Music Publishing Company in 1922, and sold for 50 cents. The song was a duet by Al Bernard and Ernest Hare, and the song was recorded on Brunswick record number 2347. Bernard was well known as a blackface minstrel singer, but later in his career became a prolific recording artist for many labels, and Bernard and Hare often recorded duets together.

“Sweet Italian Love”

National Museum of American History
The sheet music for the song “Sweet Italian Love” was written by Irving Berlin and composed by Ted Snyder. The music was published by the Ted Snyder Company. The song came from the Shubert Production of “Up and Down Broadway.” The cover is blue with blue lettering, and features an early photo of Irving Berlin.
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