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Tolowa Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List

1ST V, TOL CT19, 21 MINS:1ST R, TOL CT20, 21 MINS

Aluminum disc

Tolowa Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List

2ND A, TOL CT27, 27 MINS:2ND B, TOL CT28, 21 MINS; ORIGINAL DISC VARIABLE SPEED, DEFECTIVE RECORDER

Aluminum disc

Tolowa Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List

1ST G, TOL CT7, 21 MINS:1ST H, TOL CT8, 21 MINS

Aluminum disc

Tolowa Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List

1ST C, TOL CT3, 17 MINS:1ST D, TOL CT4, 19 MINS

Aluminum disc

Tolowa Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List

1ST W, TOL CT23, 21 MINS:1ST X, TOL CT24, 21 MINS

Aluminum disc

Tolowa Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List

1ST Y, TOL CT25, 28 MINS:1ST Z, TOL CT26, 21 MINS; POOR TRACK- ING, ORIGINAL DISC VARIABLE SPEED, VOLUME DRASTICALLY DROPS NEAR CENTER OF TAPE FOR 5 MINS.

Aluminum disc

Tolowa Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Jpm List

1ST I, TOL CT9, 21 MINS:1ST J, TOL CT10, 21 MINS

Aluminum disc

Today's Lesson

National Air and Space Museum

As part of NASA’s Teacher in Space Program, Christa McAuliffe prepared lesson plans and lectures to beam into classrooms from orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger. She, and the rest of the Challenger crew, were lost when the Shuttle broke apart 73 seconds after launch. This episode is about the lessons she had planned to perform in space, which now form an important part of her legacy.

Christa planned six science activities, known as the six lost lessons, that were to be used as educational resources for students around the world. The Challenger Center, in partnership with NASA and STEM on Station, worked with astronauts Ricky Arnold and Joe Acaba to film these demonstrations on the International Space Station and complete these lessons.

Emily, Matt, and Nick reflect on the Teacher in Space program, the lost lessons, and the impact McAuliffe had on a generation of students, teachers, and astronauts.

You can find more information about Christa McAuliffe’s lost lessons, including videos, lesson plans, and other STEM resources at challenger.org.

Time (Program #15)

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
This show will mine the Folkways catalogue for songs about clocks and time, at least Western conceptions of time. We start with a little bluegrass reflection on clocks and then move onto all sorts of songs with references to time or time keeping. A timely program. Smithsonian Folkways: Sounds to Grow On is a 26-part series hosted by Michael Asch that features the original recordings of Folkways Records.

Tim Conlon and Dave Hupp, artist interview

National Portrait Gallery
Interview with Tim Conlon and Dave Hupp - their graffiti art was part of NPG's exhibition "RECOGNIZE! Hip Hop and Contemporary Portraiture. Interview by NPG Web Developer Benjamin Bloom.

Tillamook sound recording 1941

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Disc Note:Jpm List

A, TIL CT1A, 21 MINS, TIL CT1B, 24 MINS:B, TIL CT2A, 21 MINS, TIL CT2B, 24 MINS

Aluminum disc

Side 1 (A): A rehearing of The Thunder-Bird, Tillamook story taken from Boas' book and re-translated from English back to Tillamook. Side 2 (B): The Thunder-Bird cont. Cf.: Boas, Franz. 1898. Traditions of the Tillamook Indians. JAF 11(40), 23-38.

Thurgood Marshall portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
L. Michael Seidman, professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center and a former clerk of Justice Marshall's, discusses a portrait of Thurgood Marshall by Betsy Graves Reyneau

Thomas Jefferson portrait, Face-to-Face talk-

National Portrait Gallery
Chrysanthe Broikos, curator at the National Building Museum, discusses a portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Mather Brown,on view at the National Portrait Gallery in the exhibition "America's Presidents"

Thomas Jefferson portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Sid Hart, senior historian at NPG, discusses a portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Charles Willson Peale

Thomas Jefferson portrait by Mather Brown, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Brandon Fortune, curator at NPG, discusses Mather Brown's portrait of Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Carr Howe interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Thomas Carr Howe (1904-1994) was the director of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco for nearly four decades. During World War II, Howe enlisted and was a U.S. Naval Lieutenant before being assigned to the MFAA Section, serving from 1945 to 1946 in Germany and Austria. In this audio clip, Howe talks about locating large caches of art work that had been looted by the Nazis in the salt mines and the postwar restitution efforts and returning the artwork to their countries of origin.

This One's for Dilla

Smithsonian Institution

Even if you’ve never heard his name, you’ve probably heard his sound. J Dilla was a prolific hip-hop artist who collaborated with many hip-hop greats – from Questlove to Erykah Badu to Eminem. In this episode, we’re telling the story of J Dilla’s life and legacy through those that knew him best – his mother (aka Ma Dukes), James Poyser, and Frank Nitt – and some surprising objects on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

This Episode Smells

Smithsonian Institution

Smell connects us to memories of the people and the places of our lives. But what if it could connect us to a past we’ve never experienced? That's the goal for one team of artists and scientists who used DNA to try to revive the scent of a flower extinct for more than a century.

This Color Is Who I Am

Smithsonian Institution

Artist Frank Holliday's social circle in the 1980s was a who's who of New York City cool: Andy Warhol, Cyndi Lauper, RuPaul, Keith Haring, and even Madonna. But Frank's odyssey through the art world also placed him at the center of an epidemic that would shake the entire country. In honor of World AIDS Day, Sidedoor takes a look at America's early HIV/AIDS Crisis through the eyes of an artist whose life and work were changed by it forever. 

This episode features recordings from the "Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic" Oral History Project produced by the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art.

Things You'd Never Tell Your Parents

Smithsonian Institution

Regie Cabico has been called the "Lady Gaga of Spoken Word poetry"—he's outspoken, provocative and iconoclastic. The son of Filipino immigrants living in rural Maryland, Regie says he’ll never be “entirely American or entirely Filipino,” and on stage he uses his poetry to explore identity, social issues, and (of course) love. Regie joins Sidedoor *in studio* for an exclusive live performance, and even offers some poetic cooking tips from the annals of American history.

Thelonious Monk portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Jim Barber, historian at NPG, discusses a portrait of Thelonious Monk by Boris Chaliapin.

The visual arts and the myth of Southern California, 1900-1950 : panel discussion, 1986 October 18-19

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 6 sound cassettes.

A panel discussion sponsored by the Archives of American Art. The participants were Kevin Starr, Neil Harris, Merle Schipper, Constance Glenn, Bram Dijkstra, Susan Larsen, William Moritz, David Gebhard, and David De Long. Stella Paul is moderator.

The museum and its public: scholarship or spectacle : panel discussion, 1986 February 13

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette. A panel discussion sponsored by the Archives of American Art at the Founders Luncheon and Museum Panel, held at the Beverly Hills Hotel, 1986 February 13. The participants were Richard Koshalek, director of the Museum of Contemporary Art; Earl A. Powell, Director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Robert Middlekauff, Director of the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery. Paul Karlstrom is moderator.
Moderator Paul Karlstrom introduces the topic and panelists; identifies differences between the three institutions, the appeal of blockbuster shows, and with references to an article by Mortibello of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, questions whether a museum can successfully balance scholarship and interpretation; the high cost of research and programming; and the shift to temporary exhibitions.
Koshalek discusses how MOCA continues to look for a balance as a new organization and their decision to start with temporary exhibits to build an audience and collection. Middlekauff discusses the Huntington as a research institution and its policy to not loan books and papers and the impact then on hosting only temporary exhibits, and the parallel to problems universities face in funding programming. Powell discusses the benefits of blockbuster exhibits, the need to integrate scholarship, and the problems in corporate sponsorships.

The coming of modernism to Chicago, 1910-1940, 1988 March

Archives of American Art
6 sound cassettes Recordings of a symposium on modernism in Chicago, sponsored by the Archives of American Art. Participants include Neil Harris, Charlotte Moser, Allen Weller, Stefan Germer, Ann Lee Morgan, Susan Platt, Susan Weininger, Paul Kruty, Lloyd Engelbrecht, Avis Berman, Sue Ann Kendall and Richard (Rick) Brettell.
The end of Susan Weininger's talk and the beginning of Paul Kruty's talk are missing due to technical difficulties at the time of recording.
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