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Found 611 Collections

 

Teaching Resources | Symbolic Cities: The Work of Ahmed Mater

How do you see the world? What’s your point of view? What informs, shapes, and affects it? What does it mean to take on another person’s point of view, and why is it important? This teaching collection features two artworks from the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery by Ahmed Mater, a contemporary Saudi artist. Use this collection to introduce global competency and close looking in the classroom.

In addition to teaching strategies and two artworks by Ahmed Mater, this collection also includes: an article on global thinking routines; a digital version of the book "Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World;" the gallery guide to the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery exhibition "Symbolic Cities, the Work of Ahmed Mater;" an article about Ahmed Mater's "Symbolic Cities" exhibition; and a link to a Learning Lab student activities set using the strategies and resources compiled here.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Tag: Middle East, Near East, Saudi Arabia, Mecca, Urbanization, Project Zero, Asia Society, See Think Wonder, 3 Ys
Freer|Sackler Education
11
 

Compare and Contrast: Personal Perspectives in Portraiture

In this activity, students will explore how portraits reflect both the personality of the subject portrayed and the artist's personal view of the subject. They will examine two portraits, both painted by American artist James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), of his patron British shipping magnate Frederick Richards Leyland (1831-1892). Using looking strategies, students will compare and contrast the artist's perspective of his subject, then will connect the portraits to music as a final activity.

This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day by the Education Department at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, in collaboration with Tess Porter, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: Peacock Room, Whistler, portrait

Freer|Sackler Education
6
 

AP Art History Curriculum Framework: Focus on "Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to Kings"

This educational resource is designed especially for teachers and students in Advanced Placement (AP) Art History courses. It focuses on an artwork from the Freer|Sackler collection, Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to Kings; one of the 250 works that are featured in the AP Art History curriculum. In particular, this artwork is in Content Area 8 - South, East, and Southeast Asia.

The AP Art History curriculum stresses the investigation of four key areas for each artwork: Form, Function, Content, and Context. This resource will touch on all four areas and can be adapted for use.



Tags: Album, AP, Art History, emperor, India, Jahangir, manuscript, Mughal dynasty, Muslim, portrait, Project Zero, See/Think/Wonder


Background Note to Teachers

India's Mughal emperors, who reigned over a vast and wealthy empire that extended over most of the South Asian subcontinent between the 16th and 19th centuries, were passionate about lavish manuscripts and paintings. Between 1556 and 1657, the greatest Mughal patrons—the emperors Akbar, Jahangir and Shah Jahan—formed grand workshops that brought together and nurtured India's leading painters, calligraphers and illuminators. This resource focuses on just one of the paintings created for Jahangir, but the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery form one of the world's most important repositories of Mughal and Persian painting. To search our collection, refer to http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/edan/default.cf....


Related Standards

  • C3 D2.His.1.6-8 - Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.
  • C3 D2.His.2.6-8 - Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
  • C3 D2.His.14.6-8 - Explain multiple causes and effects of events and developments in the past.
  • C3 D2.His.15.6-8 - Evaluate the relative influence of various causes of events and developments in the past.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 - Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 7 - Perceive and analyze artistic work.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 8 - Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 11 - Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 1B - The student understands the encounters between Europeans and peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 3C - The student understands the rise of the Safavid and Mughal empires.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 6A - The student understands major global trends from 1450 to 1770.
  • NCSS 1 : Culture - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
  • NCSS 2 : Time, Continuity, and Change - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.
  • NCSS 3 : People, Places, and Environments - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments.


Resources

This collection has been compiled from materials available on the Freer|Sackler website. In addition, these resources have been especially useful:

Milo Cleveland Beach, The Imperial Image: Paintings for the Mughal Court. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 2012.

Print and online materials related to "Worlds within Worlds: Imperial Paintings from India and Iran," an exhibition held at the Freer|Sackler from July 28 through Sept. 16, 2012.


Freer|Sackler Education
12
 

Art and Science Intersections at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction for educators to the intersections of art and science.  Each image links to resources,  which include Freer|Sackler works of art, exhibition information, 3-D tours, videos, online interactives, and articles.  Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it for your students.

Keywords: Buddha, Buddhism, lacquer, stone, bronze, carving, conservation, technology, China, bells, music, sound, Resound, 3-D, STEM, STEAM, Metropolitan Museum, Walters Art Museum, Smithsonian, arts, science 

Freer|Sackler Education
17
 

An Introduction to Japanese Painting

This collection was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction to Japanese painting for educators. It is a collection of artworks from the museum's permanent collection that draw from a wide variety of formats, styles, media, and subjects that represent many of the major trends in Japanese painting. Each image includes key information about the artwork, as well as ideas for class discussion, lesson components, and/or links to resources such as videos and articles which provide additional information about the artwork. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use. 

Keywords: Buddha, Hokusai, Mount Fuji, watercolor, bodhisattva, Fugen, Sōtatsu, cherry blossoms, seasons, Genji, crane, emakibyobukakemono, ukiyo-e, map, teacher, student, autumn, Japan, Japanese art, landscape, Edo period, Buddhism, Heian period, water, ocean, wave, boat, flower, insect, Muromachi period, river, surimono



Freer|Sackler Education
12
 

Timeline of Ancient China (5000 BCE - 220 CE)

This collection contains an interactive timeline of the art and archaeology of Ancient China from about 5000 BCE to 220 CE. It includes information on each period in this time range: Late Neolithic period, Erlitou culture, Shang dynasty, Western Zhou dynasty, Eastern Zhou dynasty, Qin dynasty, and Han dynasty; each with a representative object from each time period, ranging from a jade cong to a bronze incense burner.

Authors of this collection are the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: art history; artifact; archaeologist; ritual; Chinese; asia; Asian; warring states period; terracotta army; terra cotta;


Freer|Sackler Education
7
 

Educating for Global Competence with Contemporary Asian Art

What is global competence?  What are the skills and dispositions of globally competent students?  What role can art play in educating students for global competence?  Teachers can use this Learning Lab Collection as a resource for students to explore themes of global importance in the arts of Asia.  The Collection features two works of contemporary Asian art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with several tools for students to examine and reflect about the works of art, such as Visible Thinking Routines,  Artful Thinking Routines, or Global Thinking Routines.  For each routine, the rationale and  process is described to help the teacher practice.  The Collection also includes artist interviews and other contextual information about the works of art for teachers and students to deepen their understanding.

This Learning Lab Collection was created to support the The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) National Teachers of the Year 2018 program.  CCSSO is a nonpartisan, nationwide, nonprofit organization of public officials who head departments of elementary and secondary education in the states, the District of Columbia, the Department of Defense Education Activity, the Bureau of Indian Education and the five U.S. extra-state jurisdictions.  Learn more at https://www.ccsso.org/

Essential Questions to be addressed by this Learning Lab Collection:

  • What are some practical tools teachers can use to look closely and reflect about works of art?
  • How can we use works of art to prepare students to understand the world and participate in it?
  • How do we define global competence and globally competent students?

#NTOY18

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Asian; Asia; Freer|Sackler; Project Zero; Global Competence; Global Competency; Visible Thinking; Artful Thinking; Chalk Talk; See-Think-Wonder; 3Ys; 3-2-1 Bridge; Contemporary Asian Art; China; India; Monkeys; Religion; Architecture; Chinese Cultural Revolution; Xu Bing; Terminal; Subodh Gupta; Sculpture; Lacquer; Wood; Brass 

Freer|Sackler Education
22
 

Aiko Garcia-Xelhuantzi 1920s and the 1930s Artifacts

Purpose of the project is to discover further into these two important time periods.

Aiko Garcia-Xelhuantzi
10
 

The Smithsonian's Caribbean Indigenous Legacies Project: Celebrating Taíno Culture

This topical collection contains information about the Smithsonian's Caribbean Indigenous Legacies Project: Celebrating Taíno Culture, with links to the Heye Center exhibition, "Taíno : Native Heritage and Identity in the Caribbean," and to a related public program/webcast, "Taíno: A Symposium in Conversation with the Movement," from the National Museum of the American Indian. 

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Student example: Research on Dale Chihuly Glass Sculptor

This understands the building and inspiration planned upon in Chihuly's work. Through his mark makings, and his interest in space he delves into a world of chance and perseverance through his work. In this collection, this will be a test run of artistic research for a students personal art making journey. As a student perspective, he/or she this would be research sought after a museum visit.  Eventually this collection would be use as a guide and a way to organize their own thoughts for their art or class assignment. 

Lindsey Flax
10
 

Middle school music and art

a collection of ideas and lessons for middle school art and music

Ciara Everett
5
 

Close Looking at Three Portraits of Poet Frank O'Hara

This teaching collection uses Project Zero thinking and other portrait reading strategies to look critically at and compare  three portraits of Francis Russell "FrankO'Hara (March 27, 1926 – July 25, 1966), an American writer, poet, art critic, and curator at the Museum of Modern Art. O'Hara, who was considered to be one of the most important poets of mid-twentieth-century America, died an untimely death at age 40, and is memorialized in these three portraits in the Smithsonian collections - by Grace Hartigan, Alice Neel, and Don Bachardy.

This collection is set up to first look carefully at Grace Hartigan's portrait, using one or all of three suggested looking strategies. Then viewers can look at the other two portraits, considering additional information about sitter Frank O'Hara and the artists, in order to have a better sense of the three portraits, the sitter, the artists, and the times in which they created.

Keywords: Portraiture, Abstract Expressionism, Expressionist, Avant-Garde, Irish

Philippa Rappoport
15
 

Religion in Diaspora: How did a Shofar Come to the National Museum of African American History and Culture?

This teaching collection asks students to consider a Jewish ritual object, the shofar, as an entry point to discuss the transmission of traditions and beliefs across the globe. Using Project Zero looking and global thinking  routines, students can examine images of shofars, listen to shofar music,  explore photos from African American Jewish communities,  and consider how traditions and religious beliefs are carried around the globe with their practitioners. The activity concludes with a discussion to foster in students a broader understanding and appreciation of today’s complex world.

Philippa Rappoport
24
 

Reading/ELA: Setting

Christina Ratatori
15
 

Reading/ELA: Characters

Story Elements | Story Starters

Christina Ratatori
18
 

Colonial America

Christina Ratatori
14
 

Latino Family Stories through Art

Student activity collection analyzing the work of two very different Mexican American artists, identifying aspects of culture and exploring expressions about Latino experiences in art. Included in this collection, are five paintings highlighting Latino families, paired with observation and analysis questions and interviews with the artists, Carmen Lomas Garza and Jesse Treviño, as well as podcast analyses of the paintings from the museum's director. As a supplement, students could read a book by Garza depicting her childhood memories of growing up in a traditional Mexican American community, or lead a discussion comparing this artwork with other images of families found in the Smithsonian collections. #LatinoHAC

Victor Vega
16
 

People, Place and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Collection 3 - Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente by Adrián Román (" Viajero")

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente” by Adrian “Viajero” Román. In this three-dimensional multimedia installation, the artist portrays a black Puerto Rican woman who migrated to the United States in the 1940s. This portrait allows the artist (in his own words) “ to embark on a quest to visually represent how precious our memories are and capture the dignity in the people’s struggle and validate their existence.” The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines.

 Students will observe and analyze this three dimensional work of art and they will describe both its exterior and interior. Students will create their own box to reflect their heritage and personal story or that of a Hispanic figure.

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool Funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art and culture,and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

# National Portrait Gallery  #The Outwin # Adrián “Viajero” Román # Caja de Memoria Viva II # Spanish # Puerto Rico # New York # Empathy # Inequality # Critical thinking # Curiosity # Heritage # Stories #LatinoHAC


Marcela Velikovsky
46
 

People, Place and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente by Adrián Román ("Viajero")

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente” by Adrian “Viajero” Román. In this three-dimensional multimedia installation, the artist portrays a black Puerto Rican woman who migrated to the United States in the 1940s. This portrait allows the artist (in his own words) “ to embark on a quest to visually represent how precious our memories are and capture the dignity in the people’s struggle and validate their existence.” The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines. 

 Students will observe and analyze this three dimensional work of art and they will describe both its exterior and interior. Students will create their own box to reflect their heritage and personal story or that of a Hispanic figure.

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool Funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art and culture,and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

# National Portrait Gallery  #The Outwin # Adrián “Viajero” Román # Caja de Memoria Viva II # Spanish # Puerto Rico # New York # Empathy # Inequality # Critical thinking # Curiosity # Heritage # Stories #LatinoHAC


Vicky Masson
45
 

American Enterprise: Corporate Era (Great Depression, New Deal)

During the Corporate Era, the United States experienced its most serious economic crisis; in response, political leaders intervened in the economy in innovative ways. In this collection, you’ll explore life during the Great Depression and evaluate New Deal policies by participating in a learning activity the teacher specifies.
Zach Etsch
5
 

Triumph and Tragedy at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to support the 2019 National History Day theme, Triumph and Tragedy in History. Utilizing portraits and other resources from the National Portrait Gallery, this collection is organized by Topics within the Triumph and Tragedy theme. 

Be sure to check out the following at the end of the collection: 

-Reading Portraiture Guide for Educators highlights close looking strategies that can be used with the portraits listed

-Triumph and Tragedy In History Theme Book from National History Day 2019

#NHD2019 #NHD

#NPGteach


Briana White
105
 

Zozobra in Santa Fe: A Contemporary Reckoning of a Local Tradition

This teaching collection encourages students to think about all sides of an issue - in this case a cultural event - and then make connections to related issues of identity and nationalism locally, nationally, and internationally. The collection uses an article by Eduardo Díaz, director of the Smithsonian Latino Center, and Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, as a jumping off point to explore changes to Santa Fe's annual Fiesta de Santa Fe, described by organizers as “the oldest, most colorful community celebration in the nation,” as part of an ongoing conversation across the country about how we choose to honor our "history, multicultural legacies and unique blend of traditions."

The exercise is scaffolded with global competence strategies to help students explore the Fiesta in successive detail, consider the various perspectives of the communities involved, and make connections to similar conversations happening across the US today. Students can share ideas in groups or through writing assignments, adding in outside research  if desired. 

Keywords: American Indian, Native American, Pueblo Indians, Hispanic, Latino, Entrada

#LatinoHAC


Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Walt Whitman: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Walt Whitman, an American poet, essayist, and journalist. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  Also includes "A Close, Intimate Look at Walt Whitman," an article about the final portrait in this collection that may be used as a lesson extension.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how he wanted to be seen, or how others wanted him to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having read one of his poems, does the portrait capture your image of Walt Whitman? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Walt Whitman, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: new york, ny, leaves of grass, humanist, writer

Tess Porter
9
 

Tennessee Williams: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Tennessee Williams, an American playwright and Pulitzer Prize winner. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how they wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created (such as Time Magazine, stamp, etc.).
  • Having read one of his plays, does the portrait capture your image of Tennessee Williams? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Tennessee Williams, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: mississippi, ms, play, author, streetcar named desire, writer

Tess Porter
7
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