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Found 947 Collections

 

Santa Claus: Comparing Evolving Imagery and Text

This collection gathers depictions of Santa Claus from ads, paintings, photographs, stamps from 1837 to today. Also, includes analyses of his evolving image from the Smithsonian Magazine and the National Museum of American History blog. How does the description of Santa in the Christmas poem, "A Visit from St. Nicholas" compare with the images that follow? Includes a discussion question extension: How might you revamp Christmas stories to better reflect the time and country that you live in?

Keywords: Saint Nicholas, holidays, poetry

Ashley Naranjo
26
 

The Monsters of Our Minds or The Monsters of This Earth

For decades humans have depicted art in various forms that consist of monsters. This made me ask myself; what exactly is a monster? These pieces of art consist of images that their creators describe as monsters. I am going to delve in to the history behind these objects and symbols to figure out if they are really monsters or if our ideas of what makes an object or a person a monster skewed.

mariana addo
15
 

Paleolithic Art/paintings on stone

The students learn about paleolithic art and the symbolism of the drawings.  We will read about They end up painting their own on large rocks, to represent painting on cave walls. 



References

Avery, S. (2014). Christina Rossetti: Religious poetry. Retrieved from https://www.bl.uk/romantics-an...

https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/communication-with-the-spiritual-in-ancient-to-modern-art/P8U33Rpfau57XCbT/edit#




Curtis, G. B. (2006). The cave painters: Probing the mysteries of the world's first artists. (2006). New York: Knopf.



Moorman, E., M. (2011). Divine interiors: Mural paintings in Greek and Roman sanctuaries. Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam Press.


#AHMC2019

Kim Torgerson
10
 

African Drums; the Heartbeat of Our Culture

A collection depicting and describing different African Drums and their significance in African culture  as well as the African diaspora. Please enjoy a look at the heartbeat of our culture.

By Zuri Houston and Malik Miller 

Zuri Houston
11
 

Behind Design: Inka Bridge

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, INCA BRIDGE, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In or See Think Wonder. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Weaving the Bridge at Q'eswacha. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
32
 

#BecauseOfHerStory: Exploring Untold Stories through Portraiture and American Art

This collection features resources related to a November 22, 2019 session presented at the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference. 

Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

RELATED WEBINAR SERIES (recordings available): https://americanart.si.edu/education/k-12/professional-development/webinars

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Phoebe Hillemann
19
 

Exploring Korean Art at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab contains introductory materials to help educators explore Korean art from Freer|Sackler collections with students.  It includes the following:

  • a founding history of Korean art collections at the Freer|Sackler
  • an illustrated timeline of Korea
  • a map of major ceramic production sites in Korea
  • images and information regarding rare Buddhist paintings from the Goryeo dynasty (935-1392)
  • definitions and examples of selected clay, decoration, glaze, pigment, and symbol types in Korean art
  • Freer Gallery of Art audio tour selections of Korean art
  • curator videos from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018
  • related educator resources from other museums
  • teacher-created lessons and Learning Lab Collections from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018

Tags: Korea, Goryeo, archaeology, art, celadon, ceramics, painting, symbols, Buddhism

Freer and Sackler Galleries
114
 

Investigating the Layers of a Korean Buddhist Sculpture

This Learning Lab Collection focuses on a single Buddhist object from Korea. Students will formulate questions about a Buddhist work of art from Korea using Project Zero's Layers Visible Thinking Routine.  They will investigate answers to their questions by researching the exhibition website and engaging with various interactives and digital resources provided.  

#AsiaTeachers
Tags:  Art; Buddhism; Korea; Project Zero; research; National Museum of Korea


About the exhibition:

Sacred Dedication:  A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece
September 21, 2019–March 22, 2020
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A single object—a beautiful gilt wood sculpture of Gwaneum, the bodhisattva of compassion and the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism—is the focus of this loan exhibition from the National Museum of Korea. Carved in the late Goryeo period (918–1392), this crowned image is now known to be the oldest surviving gilded wood figure in an informal pose. Its posture, with one leg raised and the other lowered, is associated with the deity’s dwelling place, where he sits calmly on rocks above the crashing waves of the sea. The same subject in a similar pose was common in devotional paintings, such as the hanging scroll of Suwol Gwaneum bosal (Water-Moon Avalokiteshvara) now in the collection of the Freer Gallery.

Sacred texts and potent symbolic objects were sealed inside this hollow religious sculpture when it was first placed into worship in the thirteenth century. The practice of adding dedication material to a Buddhist sculpture during consecration ceremonies was believed to transform it into a living body. Recent research conducted by the National Museum of Korea provides new information about this rare sculpture, its hidden contents, and the special rituals that surrounded image consecration in Korea centuries ago.

We thank our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for sharing their research and facilitating this exhibition.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
11
 

Silk Road

Art and music along the Silk Road
Meghan Brawley
4
 

Using Authentic Resources: American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 2019

This collection gathers resources to help language students understand how art reflects culture, increase their language proficiency, and develop global competence and 21st century skills.  This collection includes artwork relevant to exploring and learning about cultural topics, guiding questions to help with lesson planning, Project Zero Global Thinking Routines, and the Sustainable Development Goals. 

The second resource in this collection gives instructions for use and was specifically created to guide participants' collection development during the presentation People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Smithsonian Collections.  A collection containing the full presentation slides is available here.

This presentation was given at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) 2019 Annual Convention and World Languages Expo on November 23, 2019. Presenters: Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School), Tess Porter (Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access), and Vicky Masson (Norwood School).

Vicky Masson
31
 

People, Place, & Time: American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 2019

This collection serves as a companion to the presentation People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Smithsonian Collections given at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) 2019 Annual Convention and World Languages Expo on November 23, 2019.  Targeted to language educators, this presentation explores how museum resources, Global Thinking Routines, and the Sustainable Development Goals can help students understand how art reflects culture, increase their language proficiency, and develop global competence and 21st century skills.  The presentation shares three case-study collections designed for the Spanish-language classroom: Night of the Dead by Alan CraneCaja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de  Clemente by Adrián Román, and Méndez v. Westminster 1947 

This collection includes presentation slides, links to the three case-study collections, museum resources, Project Zero thinking routines, examples of student work, and more. 

Presenters: Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School), Tess Porter (Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access), and Vicky Masson (Norwood School).

#Arago #Rafael Lopez #Spanish / English #Mexican-American #California #Latino Civil Rights #Empathy #Desegregation #Critical thinking #Curiosity #Stamps #LatinoHAC 

Vicky Masson
38
 

Not So Still Life

#ethnicstudies #UShistory

Malin Lindelow
6
 

Conflict, Identity, and Place in American Art (2019)

This collection contains a selection of artworks related to the themes of conflict, identity, and place.  Teachers can use these artworks for a variety of purposes; here, we use them as a catalyst for discussion, with an extended version of Project Zero's See, Think, Wonder thinking routine.  In small groups or as a classroom, have students select one artwork they find meaningful or interesting and discuss the following:

  1. Why did you pick this artwork?  
  2. What do you see?  Name specific aspects of the artwork you notice.
  3. What do you think about what you see?
  4. What does this artwork make you wonder
  5. Optional: How might the artwork connect to the themes of conflict, identity, and place?

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection contains artwork selected by Phoebe Hillemann, Teacher Institutes Educator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, featured in the 2019 Smithsonian American Art Museum Summer Institute for Teachers, "Teaching the Humanities through Art."  

These artworks serve as foundational museum resources in lesson concepts that are accessible by searching the Smithsonian Learning Lab with the hashtag: #SAAMTeach.

Ashley Naranjo
40
 

Inter/sected - LGBTQ + Asian Pacific Americans

Inter/sected, was a photo exhibit on display at the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center July 5 to September 22, 2019, that celebrated the intersected identities of Queer Asian Pacific Americans. The AARC worked with local Austin photographer Ben Aqua. Ben has titled their photo series “Slaysians,” portraits of LGBTQ+ Asians/Pacific Islanders on their Instagram account at @b3naqua. Ben's pronouns are they/them/theirs.

Teachers and students may use this collection to discuss intersectionality, Asian American identities, gender spectrum/non binary, culture and resistance to assimilation, and expressions through art.  Articles, photographs, and supplemental film, podcast and archive resources are included for further analysis on queer Asian American experiences in the US.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: asian americans, queer, LGBTQ, intersectionality, gender, queer

 #EthnicStudies

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
16
 

Making the Old New: Rethinking Monuments and Memorials

In this collection, students will work with images, videos, and texts related to Marta Minujín's "Parthenon of Books" to create a series of questions that a creator must ask and answer before designing a memorial or monument. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
8
 

Inspiration: Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome in Our Nation's Capital

In this collection, students will work with images of buildings from ancient Greece and ancient Rome along with images of iconic buildings in Washington, D.C. to identify ways that early Americans were inspired by ancient Greeks and Romans. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
7
 

Symbols: Using Images to Invoke Feelings

In this collection, students will work with Americana images to do a "close view" that will allow them to make inferences about which feelings did the artists intend to invoke by using symbols. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
9
 

Making Cultural Connections in Pre-AP World Geography

This adapted collection includes resources for ninth-grade Pre-AP World Geography students. After studying the aspects of culture in the Human Geography unit, students will focus on the culture of the United States and Canada in Unit 4. 

Using the collection, students will explain the impact of immigration on American culture. Students will also develop questions and research how their ethnic groups and culture are reflected in the art and history of North America and connected to regions of the world.

 #EthnicStudies

Melissa Blohm
35
 

Chicano movement

The theme of my collection is Chicano farm workers fighting for their rights. 

Rubina Pantoja
5
 

National History Day: American Immigrant Experiences

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2019 theme, "Triumph and Tragedy in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.  

These resources - including objects, documents, websites, and articles - reveal challenges and opportunities experienced by American immigrants in the 19th to mid-20th centuries.  Resources highlight hardships that compelled people to leave their homelands, difficulties immigrants faced upon arrival, and ways they overcame obstacles to build new lives and communities in America.  The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

The history of immigration in America is an immense topic, and this collection addresses only aspects of it.  Use this collection to brainstorm project topics, find connected resources, and as a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: 1800s, 1900s angel island, ellis island, immigration test, community, prejudice, irish, jewish, syrian, lebanese, arab, italian, mexican, german, greek, bohemian, czech, slovenian, know nothing, triangle shirtwaist factory fire, swedish, chinese exclusion act, japanese american incarceration, internment, bracero program, stories project, #NHD

Rubina Pantoja
128
 

Domingo Ulloa's

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Rubina Pantoja
10
 

Asian American Modernism

This collection is meant to build on two earlier collections, "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows"  and "Asian American Artists and World War II" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's exhibition catalog "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008),the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Artists and World War II" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

As Gordon H. Chang and Mark Dean Johnson state in the introduction of the exhibition catalog, "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008):

"Forty years ago there were no Asian Americans.  There were Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and others of Asian ancestry in the United States, but no 'Asian Americans,' as that term was coined only in 1968.  This population was commonly seen as foreign, alien, not of America.  Their lives and experiences were not generally accepted as part of the fabric of the country, even though Asians had begun settling here steadily in the mid-nineteenth century.

Then, in the late 1960s, as part of the upsurge in the self-assertion of marginalized communities,  'Asian America' emerged to challenge the stigma of perpetual foreignness.  'Asian American' was a claim of belonging, of rootedness, of pride and identity, and of history and community; it was also a recognition of distinctive cultural achievement"  (Chang, Johnson, 2008).

#APA2018

Rubina Pantoja
18
 

My ethnic studies musings

This collection was started as a way to share resources related to Mexican American Studies.  It has now morphed into a larger collection for anyone interested in ethnic studies.  It is still very much a work in progress.

Rubina Pantoja
30
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