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Found 843 Collections

 

Pictographs

Native American Pictographs
Robin McLaurin
3
 

science in art

Robin McLaurin
6
 

Art and Exercise: Jackson Pollock and Zumba

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about Zumba, students will make Jackson Pollock inspired artwork.

Essential Questions: 

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are energized? What can we do to feel more energized during the day? 

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day 1:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students look at images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. Students participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Emphasis on what Jackson Pollock does with his body to make art. I wonder, do you think that he could make this artwork if he was really sleepy? What can we do to feel more energized. Participate in Zumba video. Demo how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 2:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students review images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. What is Jackson Pollock doing to get these drippy lines? Is he splashing all over the place? Let's watch a video of Jackson Pollock working! How do we look and sound when we watch a video? See think wonder thinking routine. Is he just smashing everywhere or is he making sure to hit the canvas? Is he painting directly on the canvas or is the paint falling through the air? Participate in Zumba video. Have one student demonstrate how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 3:

Materials: Play dough, trays, paint in cups, canvas on floor, aprons, sticks and brushes, drop cloth/plastic to protect the floor

Look closely at examples of Jackson Pollock artwork. Participate in See, Think, Wonder routine. Emphasize that Jackson Pollock painted drips, not his house or his mom. Today we are going to paint just like Jackson Pollock, but first we need to make sure we aren't too sleepy to do it. Participate in Zumba video. How do we use play dough? Some children will use play dough and some will paint like Jackson Pollock. Everyone will do both, but maybe not today. Thumbs up if you understand. Transition to tables some children use play dough and some work with the teacher to paint like Jackson Pollock on the floor. Transition to carpet. What did you notice when you were painting like Jackson Pollock? What would have happened if we were really sleepy? What did we do to get energized?

(this may take more than one class to complete)

Keywords: Zumba, sand, energized, paint, Jackson Pollock, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Robin McLaurin
7
 

Pocahontas: Comparing and Contrasting Portrayals

In this collection, we explore various portrayals of Pocahontas over 400 years. Students can compare and contrast two or more artistic renderings of Pocahontas, using the provided strategies and historical context with guidance from the teacher. By using portraits of the same sitter by different artists, students consider historical accuracy and changing cultural and historical perspectives. 

This collection was adapted from National Portrait Gallery educator, Briana White's collection, "Compare and Contrast Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery " and supplemented with the National Museum of the American Indian's Americans online exhibition. Sources for the approach include Compare and Contrast, the National Portrait Gallery's Reading Portraiture Guide and Project Zero's Artful Thinking Routines. 

#historicalthinking


Robin McLaurin
21
 

Design with Empathy: Michael Graves Case Study

This collection is designed to explore the essential question: How do designers understand and experience the needs and wants of stakeholders? 

It looks into the design with empathy approach used by Michael Graves to design and test the Prime TC wheelchair for use in a hospital environment.  

Objectives:

  • Examine methods for developing empathy for your stakeholders  
  • Gain familiarity with the design process 
  • Understand what the steps of the design process might look like in application 

Unpacking Questions: 

  • What kind of things did the designers research?
  • What methods did they use to research and document primary data? 
  • Who worked with the designers on this project? What value did this add to the project perspective?
  • Which stakeholders did the design specifically accommodate? 
  • How were stakeholder needs prioritised?
  • What were the main issues the designer was trying to combat? 
  • List the steps of the design process evident in the case study.


Jasmine Kassulke
22
 

Pocahontas: Comparing and Contrasting Portrayals

In this collection, we explore various portrayals of Pocahontas over 400 years. Students can compare and contrast two or more artistic renderings of Pocahontas, using the provided strategies and historical context with guidance from the teacher. By using portraits of the same sitter by different artists, students consider historical accuracy and changing cultural and historical perspectives. 

This collection was adapted from National Portrait Gallery educator, Briana White's collection, "Compare and Contrast Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery " and supplemented with the National Museum of the American Indian's Americans online exhibition. Sources for the approach include Compare and Contrast, the National Portrait Gallery's Reading Portraiture Guide and Project Zero's Artful Thinking Routines. 

#historicalthinking


Ashley Naranjo
21
 

Great Depression

Lesson to help teach students about the Great Depression. In this lesson, students will be able to connect the Great Depression to themselves and the world around them today. This lesson is designed to evoke emotion and theme through use of color in writing, and help teach students empathy.

Christine Kohley
3
 

How Did We Get Here?: Introduction to Flying Machines

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
8
 

What does it Mean to Be a Scientist?: The Scientific Method and Taking Good Notes

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
9
 

American Flag/Washington DC Flag Lesson, One or Two Part

With this collection, students will use a version of the Zoom In thinking routine to analyze several flags with an eye toward creating their own flag at the end of the lesson.

The Guiding Questions used in this lesson are:

-How did the United States flag change over time?

-Why do countries feel that it's important to have a single flag?

The Big Idea for this lesson is:

Simple symbols, like the those presented on flags, can represent a lot about a country's past and what makes that country unique.  

In this lesson, students will begin by exploring the collection and answering, using the quiz tool,  the questions embedded about the two early versions of the American flag.  The questions push students to analyze each flag, consider how versions of the American flag changed, and think critically about how symbolism can be used in a flag to represent unique and/or historical aspects of a country. 

Once students have completed the quiz questions, the teacher will call them together to discuss  the evolution of the American flag and what the elements of the flag's current and former designs represent.  The teacher will then turn the class's attention to the Washington DC flag and reiterate that its design was taken from George Washington's English ancestry.  Using this as another example of a flag drawing upon elements of history, the teacher will  make the point that the DC flag hasn't changed in appearance in over 80 years.  

The class will brainstorm what they feel are the most important and/or interesting aspects of DC history based on what they have studied.  They will then brainstorm symbols that could be used to abstractly represent elements of DC's unique past, status, and culture.  

Once a number of good ideas have been generated, each student will have the chance to create their own version of the DC flag, either modifying the exiting version of creating a completely new design.  On the draft sheets will be a checklist that focus's students attention on the  most important aspects of any flag, namely its symbolism and its connection to the history of the place it represents.  

If the teacher wishes to make this a longer activity featuring multiple drafts, he or she can consider looping in the art teacher to discuss concepts of sketching and design.  

#LearnwithTR



Peter Gamber
5
 

Art and Exercise: Yoga & Sanpainting.

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about yoga, students will make sand painting inspired by artists around the world.

Essential Questions:

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are calm? What can we do to feel calmer during the day?

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day One:  

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets,

Compare a neatly colored sheet to a sheet with scribbles. What do you notice? Which one shows care? How do we know? Demonstrate coloring within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Look closely at the first image "Indian Man Making Sand Painting." Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Direct students to think about what the person is doing, and how they are feeling.

Day Two:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

Watch video about Tibetan sand painting. Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Why would you need to be calm to make this kind of work? What can we do to feel calm? Document answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk.

Day Three:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

What can we do to feel calm? Participate in short yoga video. Ask students how do they feel? Document student answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Alternatively, students can finish a previous coloring sheet.

Day Four:

Materials: trays, colored sand, small containers (ice cube trays or similar would be ideal)

Teacher demonstrates sand painting. Emphasis on moving slowly, using pinching, having a plan, not bumping the tray, etc. If there is time, have one student also try sand painting while teacher and students narrate what they are doing. Ask students, how do we need to feel to do this kind of work? Participate in short yoga video. Transition to tables. Students make sand paintings, teachers document student work with photographs. Afterwards, ask why was it so important for us to feel calm for this work? What did we do to make sure that we felt calm? What would have happened if we were jumping around?

Keywords: yoga, sand, mandala, exercise, sandpainting, Tibetan, American Indian, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Lianne Perez
8
 

Art and Exercise: Large Drawings and Strength Training

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do.While learning about muscles and strength training, students will create large scale drawings using their whole body in the style of artist Heather Hansen.

Essential Questions:

How can exercise change the way we feel? When might we need to be strong? What can we do to make our bodies stronger? How can we use our muscles to make art?

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day One:

Materials: Playdoh, trays

Show children playdoh. How do I use this? Don't mix the colors. Keep it on the tray or in your hands. Close the container when finished. Never take any playdoh with you.  Squeeze a ball of playdoh in your hands. Have children feel your bicept, notice the difference in my arm. These are my muscles. At tables, have children use playdoh. Encourage children to squeeze playdoh and feel their arms.

Day Two:

Materials: Playdoh, trays

 Watch film "Weightlifting at the Zoo." Participate in See, Think, Wonder thinking routine. Direct the conversation to why animals might need to be strong and what they are doing to make sure that they are strong. At tables, have children use playdoh. Encourage children to squeeze playdoh and feel their arms.

Day Three:

Materials: chalk, black paper

Ask children when does someone use their strength? Why might someone want to become stronger? Document their answers. Show children chalk. How would you use this? Make sure that you are careful because it can break easily. If you drop it on the floor, pick it up right away. Use one piece of chalk at a time. Draw only on your own paper. Send children to tables to draw on paper with chalk.

Day Four:

Materials: Large paper taped to the floor, chalk, playdoh, trays

Watch video of Heather Hansen working. Participate in See, Think, Wonder thinking routine. How would we do this kind of work? Demonstrate how to draw like Heather Hansen. In small groups have children try drawing in the style of Heather Hansen. Children who are not drawing can use playdoh.

(This lesson make take more than one day)

Day Five:

Materials: Large paper taped to the floor, chalk taped to weights, playdoh, trays

Show students chalk taped to weights. Today we will continue working like Heather Hansen, but using these instead. Demonstrate using the weights on large paper. How do you think this will be different? Will it be easier or harder? In small groups have children try drawing in the style of Heather Hansen. Children who are not drawing can use play doh.  What would happen if we didn't have strong muscles for this work? What can we do to make our muscles stronger. 

(This lesson make take more than one day)

Key Words: muscle, strength, weight, lift, Heather Hansen, body, exercise, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Allison Yood
7
 

Art and Exercise: Yoga and Sandpainting

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about yoga, students will make sand painting inspired by artists around the world.

Essential Questions:

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are calm? What can we do to feel calmer during the day?

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day One:  

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets,

Compare a neatly colored sheet to a sheet with scribbles. What do you notice? Which one shows care? How do we know? Demonstrate coloring within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Look closely at the first image "Indian Man Making Sand Painting." Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Direct students to think about what the person is doing, and how they are feeling.

Day Two:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

Watch video about Tibetan sand painting. Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Why would you need to be calm to make this kind of work? What can we do to feel calm? Document answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk.

Day Three:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

What can we do to feel calm? Participate in short yoga video. Ask students how do they feel? Document student answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Alternatively, students can finish a previous coloring sheet.

Day Four:

Materials: trays, colored sand, small containers (ice cube trays or similar would be ideal)

Teacher demonstrates sand painting. Emphasis on moving slowly, using pinching, having a plan, not bumping the tray, etc. If there is time, have one student also try sand painting while teacher and students narrate what they are doing. Ask students, how do we need to feel to do this kind of work? Participate in short yoga video. Transition to tables. Students make sand paintings, teachers document student work with photographs. Afterwards, ask why was it so important for us to feel calm for this work? What did we do to make sure that we felt calm? What would have happened if we were jumping around?

Keywords: yoga, sand, mandala, exercise, sandpainting, Tibetan, American Indian, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Allison Yood
8
 

Art and Exercise: Jackson Pollock and Zumba

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about Zumba, students will make Jackson Pollock inspired artwork.

Essential Questions: 

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are energized? What can we do to feel more energized during the day? 

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day 1:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students look at images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. Students participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Emphasis on what Jackson Pollock does with his body to make art. I wonder, do you think that he could make this artwork if he was really sleepy? What can we do to feel more energized. Participate in Zumba video. Demo how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 2:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students review images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. What is Jackson Pollock doing to get these drippy lines? Is he splashing all over the place? Let's watch a video of Jackson Pollock working! How do we look and sound when we watch a video? See think wonder thinking routine. Is he just smashing everywhere or is he making sure to hit the canvas? Is he painting directly on the canvas or is the paint falling through the air? Participate in Zumba video. Have one student demonstrate how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 3:

Materials: Play dough, trays, paint in cups, canvas on floor, aprons, sticks and brushes, drop cloth/plastic to protect the floor

Look closely at examples of Jackson Pollock artwork. Participate in See, Think, Wonder routine. Emphasize that Jackson Pollock painted drips, not his house or his mom. Today we are going to paint just like Jackson Pollock, but first we need to make sure we aren't too sleepy to do it. Participate in Zumba video. How do we use play dough? Some children will use play dough and some will paint like Jackson Pollock. Everyone will do both, but maybe not today. Thumbs up if you understand. Transition to tables some children use play dough and some work with the teacher to paint like Jackson Pollock on the floor. Transition to carpet. What did you notice when you were painting like Jackson Pollock? What would have happened if we were really sleepy? What did we do to get energized?

(this may take more than one class to complete)

Keywords: Zumba, sand, energized, paint, Jackson Pollock, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Allison Yood
7
 

science in art

Chris Crocker
6
 

Portrait Analysis: Norman Mineta

In this activity, students will analyze a portrait of Norman Mineta (b. 1931), a U.S. politician and the first Asian American to hold a post in the presidential cabinet, serving as Secretary of Transportation and Secretary of Commerce under President George W. Bush. The son of Japanese immigrants, Mineta and his family were incarcerated in the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming under Executive Order 9066 during World War II.

This activity can be used to build students vocabulary in discussing visual elements of a portrait or as an entry point for studying Norman Mineta's life and achievements, U.S. history, and more.  Questions from the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators and a Project Zero See-Think-Wonder routine guide the student inquiry.  The complete guide and instructions are located at the end of the collection. To learn more about other Asian Pacific American activists and leaders, visit this collection: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/asian-pacific-american-activists-and-leaders/MR1jszd7YDA7gujx#r

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords:  internment; Japanese American; Nisei; San Jose, California

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
10
 

“Futurescapes. Storytelling and Video-Making Workshop: Using Digital Museums Resources to Imagine Our City in 2050”

This Learning Lab collection was made to guide participants  during the Digital Storytelling workshop “Futurescapes. Storytelling and Video-Making Workshop: Using Digital Museums Resources to Imagine Our City in 2050””, a two-day event organised by the Storytelling Research Team at Loughborough University, UK, and hosted in the London campus at Here East on the 6th and the 7th of August as part of the East Education Summer School at Here East in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

During the workshop, designed and facilitated by Dr Antonia Liguori, museums objects will be used to trigger stories about a day in East London in 2050.

Participants will 

  • learn how to use the cloud-based video-editing software WeVideo to make their own digital story;
  • explore the variety of museums digital resources available online;
  • experiment with storyboarding techniques for creative writing;
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file;
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video;
  • reflect on the 5-step Digital Storytelling process;
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art.

Digital stories work best when there are rewards for both the storyteller and the viewer. Stories are always told from the perspective of the storyteller and for maximum benefit, it is vital to carefully choose the right story to tell.  All necessary information will be given during the workshop, but to maximise opportunities, participants need to bring with them an object or a photo that connects them to the place where they live now and/or to their idea about how this place could change in the future.

This workshop is also the final event of the EOOL project and aims to showcase the methodology applied in this EU funded project to explore its potential in other formal and non-formal education contexts.

Antonia Liguori
36
 

Pictographs

Native American Pictographs
Connie Grimes
3
 

Contemporary Muslim Fashion

This collection explores the significance of the Contemporary Muslim Fashion exhibition to be held at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum. The collection explores traditional examples of Muslim dress from with the Cooper Hewitt's collection, and includes news articles that discuss the exhibition as well as the impact of comtemporary Muslim Fashion.

Mandy Horton
8
 

Behind Design: Exploring Culture Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors and/or restrictions influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, traditions, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation?  *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
30
 

History and Portraiture: Utilizing Art to Teach American History, Colonial America to the Civil War

This Learning Lab contains a five unit curriculum that puts students in conversation with a diverse group of significant Americans from the colonial era to the present. Lessons on the Elements of Portrayal, Symbols, Labels, Letter Writing, and Portrait Pairing prompt students to analyze the lasting impact of remarkable individuals from the Portrait Gallery’s collection. This collection was originally created in collaboration with Alice Deal Middle School in Washington D.C. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
84
 

Shimomura's

Analyzing Roger Shimomura's painting "Diary 12, 1941" and understanding Japanese American internment

#SAAMteach 

Karen McClinchey
23
 

Formosa

Emily Pearce Seigerman
42
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