Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(394)
(1,345)
(1,512)
(1,332)
(1,680)
(30)
(696)
(586)
(301)
(968)
(335)
(358)

Found 1,739 Collections

 

Segregation, Integration, and the Civil Rights Movements in Baseball and the United States Postal Service

Issues of racial inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining the complicated and problematic history of segregation, integration, and the Civil Rights Movement with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. In the classroom, these artifacts, articles, and videos can be used to explore the common and diverging ways that segregation manifested itself in Major League Baseball and the Postal Service. Students will also be able to explore how individuals in both institutions combatted this segregation through movements for integration and, beyond that, a broader expansion of opportunity for African-American individuals in these institutions. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze the thematic significance of artistic depictions of African-American and white ballplayers and, more specifically, what these depictions communicated about these two racial groups and their place in the sport of baseball. Supporting questions and further ideas for classroom application can be found in the "Notes to Other Users" section.



National Postal Museum
31
 

Photography and News

Guiding Questions:

  • How much of a story can a photo tell? What are the limits?
  • Why do journalists take photos?
  • How is news photography different than other types of photography? What is photojournalism?

Time- 1-2 class periods with optional extension activities

This collection provides an opportunity for students to consider a first impression of news photos through careful image analysis. The initial viewing of the image is followed by reading historical newspaper articles or other primary sources about the event in question to compare their thinking with some context to their initial impressions. Images can be powerful and can greatly influence our impression of events, but without context, we can form inaccurate impressions based on our own biases. Students need to be careful and critical viewers of media as well as media creators. Images include events covered in history/social studies courses such as the Civil Rights Movement, Little Rock Nine, World War II, Japanese internment,  9/11, the Detroit Riots, the Scopes trial, women’s suffrage, Dolores Huerta and United Farm Workers, and the Vietnam War.

Day 1:

Warm Up/ Engagement:

Have students journal or a mind-map about the following questions:

  • How much of a story can a photo tell? What are the limits?
  • Why do journalists take photos?
  • What is photojournalism?
  • How is news photography different than other types of photography?

Have them do a Think-Pair-Share

Debrief as a whole group

As a whole group, discuss the photo of the female students who integrated Central High School in Little Rock. Do not show the caption to students. The global competency thinking routine, “Unveiling Stories,” is good to use for news or other current event photos because it allows students the opportunity to explore multiple layers of meaning.

Once students have discussed the image, show them the caption. Then give additional background on the Little Rock Nine. To review/background on the Little Rock Nine, consider exploring resources from Facing History and Ourselves. There is a New York Times article listed below as well.

Next, go back and look at photo with the caption and see how the initial understanding has shifted with the Connect-Extend-Challenge routine. This is a thinking routine that is great for connecting new ideas to prior knowledge.

Day 2

Have students read the article from the Click! Exhibit, “Photography Changes How We Read the World.”

After reading, lead students through the What Makes You Say That? Routine which encourages interpretation with justification and evidence.

Small Group Jigsaw activity

In pairs or small groups, assign one image in the collection to each group. Make sure they know they will present their findings to the whole class. Have them go through the “Unveiling Stories” routine with their new image. Give students 10 mins to record their thoughts and ideas on chart paper or sticky notes. Next, give each group the related primary source news article (listed below through ProQuest) or your choice of a primary source. Have students read the article together. Then, have them go back to the image and do the Connect-Extend-Challenge routine while visualizing their thinking on the same chart paper or with additional sticky notes.

Have each group share out and summarize their findings from their initial reaction to how their thinking changed after reading an additional primary source.

As a final debrief, make sure that students reflect on their learning from their image analysis.

A great reflection routine is “I used to think… Now I think…”. Have students complete this routine with the topic of photojournalism/news photography.

Extensions

Readings:

Audio:

Exhibit:

Project:

  • Report on an event with images and in writing  

Companion Article Sources on ProQuest Historical Newspapers:

For 9/11 Photos-

A CREEPING HORROR

KLEINFIELD N R

New York Times (1923-Current file); Sep 12, 2001;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. A1

For D-Day Photo:

Allies Seize Beachheads on French Coast, Invasion Forces Drive Toward Interior

By the War Editor of The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor (1908-Current file); Jun 6, 1944; ProQuest Historical Newspapers Christian Science Monitor (1908 - 2001) pg. 1

For Detroit Riot Photo:

Detroit Is Swept by Rioting and Fires; Romney Calls In Guard; 700 Arrested

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jul 24, 1967;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Vietnam Withdrawal Photo:

A Farewell to Vietnam: 2 Flown Out Tell Story

New York Times (1923-Current file); Apr 28, 1975;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Dolores Huerta Photo:

Farm Labor Law Chances Improve

By Susan Jacoby Washington Post Staff Writer

The Washington Post, Times Herald (1959-1973); May 2, 1969; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Washington Post (1877 - 1998) pg. A24

For Little Rock Photo:

STUDENTS ACCEPT NEGROES CALMLY

By BENJAMIN FINE Special to The New York Times.

New York Times (1923-Current file); Sep 26, 1957;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011)

For WWII/D-Day Photos:

PARADE OF PLANES CARRIES INVADERS

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jun 6, 1944;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Scopes Trial Photo:

DEFENSE CASE IS OUTLINED

Special to The New York Times.

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jul 16, 1925;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Women’s Suffrage March Photo: WOMEN PARADE FOR SUFFRAGE AT CAPITAL

The Christian Science Monitor (1908-Current file); Mar 3, 1913; ProQuest Historical Newspapers Christian Science Monitor (1908 - 2001) pg. 1

#visiblethinking


Allie Wilding
20
 

Investigating a Place: Texas, a U.S. State Collection

This state collection utilizes stamps, artworks, photographs, and videos in the Smithsonian's collection to highlight 65 iconic people, places, events and symbols of Texas' history and culture. Students might explore one resource in depth, or conduct a comparison of multiple resources. Follow-up questions might include: What sub-themes can you identify within this collection? What do these resources as a collection tell you about Texas? What marks someone as a "Texan"--is it birthplace alone? What other resources would you want to include to tell a more complete story of Texas history and culture?
Ashley Naranjo
64
 

Indian Wars: Dissolution of Native American Territory 1885-1900

This student activity examines what events that contributed to the change in Native American reservation boundaries over time. Includes videos that explain Native and American conflicts, maps of reservation territory in 1851-1900, readings, discussion questions, and an opportunity to learn more using an interactive map.

Jill Stedman
21
 

Four Women Who Made American History

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture.

These videos were created for a middle school audience and above.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
11
 

How Did Mia Hamm Inspire More Women to Play Sports?

Mia Hamm helped popularize soccer in the U.S. and inspire a new generation of athletes.

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Mia Hamm Inspire More Women to Play Sports?, Kamau, a student, speaks with Eric Jentsch, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, about Hamm's legacy.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
12
 

How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?

In 1970, activist Angela Davis was charged with murder. A movement arose to free her, and her time in jail Her time in jail inspired her to work to change the prison system. 

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?, Kemi, a student, talks with Kelly Elaine Navies, oral historian at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story.#BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
22
 

Why Is Celia Cruz Called the Queen of Salsa?

Celia Cruz celebrated her Cuban American identity as one of the first women salsa singers. 

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In Why Is Celia Cruz Called the Queen of Salsa?,Mincy, a student, speaks with Ariana A. Curtis, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
23
 

How Did Kitty Cone Change Disability Rights?

In 1977, 13 years before the American with Disabilities Act, Kitty Cone and other disability rights activists occupied a federal building in San Francisco. They demanded the government protect their rights.

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Kitty Cone Change Disability Rights?, Ren, a student, speaks with Katherine Ott, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, about why Cone’s work matters.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
17
 

Images of Hanuman

This collection allows students to explore different images of Hanuman from versions of the Hindu epic The Ramayana.

Alison Gillmeister
5
 

Student Activities | Exploring Point of View

How do you see the world? What's your point of view? What informs, shapes, and affects it? What does it mean to take on another person's point of view, and why is it important? This Learning Lab activity for students explores global issues, perspectives, and close looking through two artworks by Ahmed Mater, a contemporary Saudi artist. In addition to the two artworks, this collection also includes guiding questions, the gallery guide for the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery exhibition "Symbolic Cities: The Work of Ahmed Mater," and an optional article for high-school students.



Tag: Middle East, Near East, Saudi Arabia, Mecca, Urbanization, Project Zero, Asia Society, See Think Wonder, 3 Ys, point of view

Freer and Sackler Galleries
7
 

Teaching Resources | Symbolic Cities: The Work of Ahmed Mater

How do you see the world? What’s your point of view? What informs, shapes, and affects it? What does it mean to take on another person’s point of view, and why is it important? This teaching collection features two artworks from the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery by Ahmed Mater, a contemporary Saudi artist. Use this collection to introduce global competency and close looking in the classroom.

In addition to teaching strategies and two artworks by Ahmed Mater, this collection also includes: an article on global thinking routines; a digital version of the book "Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World;" the gallery guide to the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery exhibition "Symbolic Cities, the Work of Ahmed Mater;" an article about Ahmed Mater's "Symbolic Cities" exhibition; and a link to a Learning Lab student activities set using the strategies and resources compiled here.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Tag: Middle East, Near East, Saudi Arabia, Mecca, Urbanization, Project Zero, Asia Society, See Think Wonder, 3 Ys
Freer and Sackler Galleries
11
 

Comparing Sources

Students learn to compare primary sources from the same era or event.

Mackenzie Taylor
3
 

guns and stuff used in the American revolution

a collection of guns

David Marchant
10
 

Fighting World War II at Home

Preparing for World War II in the United States meant uniting the nation and encouraging citizens to support the war with their actions and funds. However, it also created divisions within the nations, as Japanese-Americans were interned, African-American soldiers were segregated, and Mexican workers recruited to help with war-time demands were discriminated against. This collection includes objects reflecting a variety of aspects of homefront life during World War II and works well as an independent activity for students to complete.

Guiding questions for discussion before and after include:

-In what ways did World War II unite the nation? In what ways did it divide the nation?

-What new opportunities were created by the need for more workers in World War II?

-How and why did government regulation of the economy increase during World War II?

-Why do you think the examples of propaganda in this collection were so effective?

Kate Harris
26
 

Women in Sports: Cindy Whitehead’s GN4LW Skateboard Conversation Kit Resources

A skateboarding pioneer, Cindy Whitehead turned pro at seventeen, skating both pool and half-pipe and becoming one of the top-ranked vert skaters while competing against the boys—something girls were not doing in the mid-1970s. But Whitehead had no choice but to wear boys’ shorts when competing; there were no skate products for girls in the 1970s.

She changed that in 2013 with her girl-empowered brand Girl is NOT a 4 Letter Word (GN4LW). Whitehead is especially supportive of young female skaters through the GN4LW skate team and products which are geared towards women and girls.  

Whitehead’s signature phrase printed in gold on many of the GN4LW products personifies her independent spirit, "Live life balls to the wall. Do epic sh*t. Take every dare that comes your way. You can sleep when you’re dead." 


This Learning Lab collection contains artifacts and resources that support the Conversation Kit on Cindy Whitehead's GN4LW Skateboard as part of the Smithsonian's American Women's History Initiative. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
33
 

Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2020 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2020 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges." Three Smithsonian staff members will present at the session, including Igor Krupnik (Curator of Arctic and Northern Ethnology collections and Head of the Ethnology Division at the National Museum of Natural History), Alison Cawood (Citizen Science Coordinator at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center), and Ashley Peery (Educator for the exhibition "Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World, " at the National Museum of Natural History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included inside.

As you explore these resources, be sure to jot down any questions you have for the presenters. It is sure to be a fascinating and fruitful seminar series!

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

American Indian and Black Civil Rights: A Shared Legacy

This is a topical collection concerning Civil Rights activism led by the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the Black Panther Party. It includes photographs, videos, and documentation from both movements. The imagery in this collection addresses the shared legacy of American Indian and Black resistance efforts in the 20th century. It also shows the continued impact of these efforts and their modern reflections, like ongoing Indigenous led efforts against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and Black Lives Matter.

This collection includes remarkable figures in both AIM and the BPP, like Russell Means (Oglala Lakota) and Angela Davis. The daily lives of those whom AIM and BPP stood up for is also addressed.

This collected was created and organized by Kenlontae' Turner, a visual artist and gallery coordinator, during his time as an intern at NMAI. Some additional context and editing was provided by Maria Ferraguto to support his work during her time time as an intern at NMAI. 

Maria Ferraguto
60
 

The Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance was a social and artistic movement of the 1920s that took place in the eclectic neighborhood of Harlem, New York. African-Americans, many of whom had migrated from the South to escape the harsh realities of racism and segregation, brought Harlem to life during this era with music, dance, poetry, film, education, literature, entrepreneurship, and social activism. This unprecedented revolution and its icons birthed knowledge and artistry that continues to impact American culture today. Such icons include Zora Neale Hurston, Mary McLeod Bethune, Madam C.J. Walker, Oscar Micheaux, Duke Ellington, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, and Mahalia Jackson.

 The individual contributions of these “Harlemites” were so distinguished that the Citizen’s Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAG) of the United States Postal Service selected each to be commemorated on a United States Postage Stamp. These stamps have been digitized and are housed at the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum.

The Harlem Renaissance Collection includes a video on each Harlem Renaissance icon and an activity that teachers can use in the classroom.

Keywords: NMAAHC, National Postal Museum, American History, African American History, Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston, Mary McLeod Bethune, Madam C.J. Walker, Oscar Micheaux, Duke Ellington, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, Mahalia Jackson

Kyle Wallace
11
 

Jla Capunpun WWI Artifacts

The purpose of this collection is to show the history and information of what happened during World War I through artifacts that were saved.

Jla Capunpun
7
 

WW1 Artifacts - Gabe Adamos

The purpose of this project is to see how much we have learned about WWI.

Gabriel James Adamos
7
 

WWI Artifacts

This project is about a collection of artifacts in WWI and how they helped me learn about the war.

Luna Basinger
7
 

WW1 Final Presenation

Taylor Morrison
7
97-120 of 1,739 Collections