Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(340)
(934)
(1,106)
(967)
(1,231)
(22)
(496)
(389)
(191)
(716)
(261)
(271)

Found 1,274 Collections

 

Our World By Design

Our World by Design highlights objects from Cooper Hewitt's 2018 ad campaign. Each object brings awareness to the critical role design plays in enabling people to engage and interact in the world.

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
18
 

People, Place and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente by Adrián Román ("Viajero")

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente” by Adrian “Viajero” Román. In this three-dimensional multimedia installation, the artist portrays a black Puerto Rican woman who migrated to the United States in the 1940s. This portrait allows the artist (in his own words) “ to embark on a quest to visually represent how precious our memories are and capture the dignity in the people’s struggle and validate their existence.” The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines. 

 Students will observe and analyze this three dimensional work of art and they will describe both its exterior and interior. Students will create their own box to reflect their heritage and personal story or that of a Hispanic figure.

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool Funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art and culture,and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

# National Portrait Gallery  #The Outwin # Adrián “Viajero” Román # Caja de Memoria Viva II # Spanish # Puerto Rico # New York # Empathy # Inequality # Critical thinking # Curiosity # Heritage # Stories #LatinoHAC


Vicky Masson
45
 

People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Night of the Dead by Alan Crane

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Night of the Dead” by Alan Crane. The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines. 

Students will investigate how the Day of the Dead is celebrated by Latin Americans and compare it to their own celebrations. Next, students  will create an interactive presentation using Flipgrid and write a monologue to reflect their learning from the point of view of one of the persons in the artwork. 

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art, and culture, and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

#National Portrait Gallery #Spanish #Global awareness #Empathy #Global connections #Global-mindedness #Curiosity #Cross-cultural skills #Day of the Dead #Worldview #LatinoHAC


Vicky Masson
46
 

Shaping America: Early America to the Civil War Portraits

Meet the politicians, reformers, inventors, authors, soldiers and others who shaped the course of American history from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. Students will analyze portraits to learn about the diverse and significant contributions to American society made by individuals in the Portrait Gallery’s collection.

#NPGteach

Miranda Daniels
25
 

Revolutionary War Boston Massacre

Weapons were extremely useful to 18th Century colonists. Some used them to keep their families safe, while others used them to show off their wealth. On the other hand, there were a multitude of wars and skirmishes that occurred in America in the 18th century, from the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary to the Whiskey Rebellion. This armed colonists across America, and affected how the Revolutionary War would be fought.

The French and Indian War in particular played a massive role in the Americans' aquiring of weapons. Many colonists fought alongside the British in the French and Indian War just 13 years earlier. In effect, many colonists used the same weapons they used to fight alongside the British, to fight against them in the Revolutionary War. The large quantity of British weapons in America eventually led to American emulation of British weapons. American weaponsmiths created plenty of weapons for the Revolutionary War after a period where most weapons entering the Americas where from Britain. Weaponsmiths made low tier imitations of British weapons such as different variations of muskets, rifles, bayonets, swords, and tomahawks. These weapons were very useful and vital with regard to the war effort. In effect, The Americans used a mixture of British and American-made weapons that eventually led to American victory at Yorktown in 1781.

This collection should show the progression of weaponry in Colonial America during the Revolutionary War. The British shot Americans in the Boston Massacre with their muskets, and the colonists fought back during the Revolutionary War with old British weapons from the French and Indian War. This collection should also show how Americans even began imitating British weapons and eventually won the war with their lower tier weapons.

Miranda Daniels
12
 

Who Was to Blame for World War 1

#teachinginquiry

Elizabeth Evans
6
 

The March on Washington

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s tackled many problems facing African-Americans at the time. This collection offers a brief video introduction into the March on Washington in 1963, which brought national attention to many of these issues, and asks students to analyze a photograph and three artifacts from the March. Students will answer the question "What problems did participants in the March on Washington aim to solve?" and consider how these issues continue to have relevance in the United States today.

tags: Civil Rights, Martin Luther King, A. Phillip Randolph
Carol Sponholtz
7
 

Exploring Korean Art at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab contains introductory materials to help educators explore Korean art from Freer|Sackler collections with students.  It includes the following:

  • a founding history of Korean art collections at the Freer|Sackler
  • an illustrated timeline of Korea
  • a map of major ceramic production sites in Korea
  • images and information regarding rare Buddhist paintings from the Goryeo dynasty (935-1392)
  • definitions and examples of selected clay, decoration, glaze, pigment, and symbol types in Korean art
  • Freer Gallery of Art audio tour selections of Korean art
  • curator videos from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018
  • related educator resources from other museums
  • teacher-created lessons and Learning Lab Collections from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018

Tags: Korea, Goryeo, archaeology, art, celadon, ceramics, painting, symbols, Buddhism

Freer|Sackler Education
111
 

The History and Spread of Islam

This collection can be used by students to explore the founding, history, and spread of Islam. Includes short informational texts paired with artifacts from around the globe and some links to additional resources. Students are tasked with tracking the countries that are mentioned on a map, taking notes on how the religion spread, and how the religion may have changed as it spread to new areas and ethnic groups. There is a quiz to assess their understanding of these concepts at the end.

The guiding questions for this collection are:
1) Where was Islam founded and where did it spread?
2) How did the religion spread from place to place?
3) How were the practices and the beliefs adapted by the people of different geographic areas?

Maritt Wolfrom
36
 

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Martin Luther King, Jr. found inspiration in Henry David Thoreau. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Grace Davis
49
 

La Purisima Mission State Historic Park Ruins to Rebuild

In 1834, secularization of the 21 Missions of California was enforced.  This meant California Missions were either converted into Catholic Churches or converted to ranches, or to other uses.  As a result, La Purísima Mission property and land holdings were divided into ranches.

As the years progressed, the property was bought and sold a number of times. In 1845, La Purísima Mission was sold to Juan Temple of Los Angeles for $1,000. At the close of the 19th century the property was so badly neglected the adobe buildings, and other features of the Mission eventually collapsed from weather and lack of upkeep.

In 1933, the Union Oil Company obtained ownership of La Purísima Mission for oil speculation, and the condition of the Mission was in complete ruin. It wasn't until 1934, when preservation and reconstruction of the Mission began through efforts of the County of Santa Barbara, the State of California, the National Park Service, and the Civilian Conservation Corps. 

This collection shows the neglect and decay of the adobe buildings at  La Purísima  Mission through the lens of history.



Brad Krey
15
 

La Purísima Mission State Historic Park Ruins

In 1834, Secularization of the 21 Missions of California was enforced.  This meant California Missions were either converted into Catholic Churches or reduced to ranches, or to other uses.  As a result La Purisima Mission property and land holdings were divided into ranches.

As the years progressed the property was bought and sold a number of times. In 1845, La Purisima Mission was sold to Juan Temple of Los Angeles for $1,000. At the close of the 19th century the property was so badly neglected the adobe buildings, and other features of the Mission eventually collapsed from weather and lack of upkeep.

In 1933, Union Oil Company obtained ownership of La Purisima Mission for oil speculation, and the condition of the Mission was in complete ruin. It wasn't until 1934, when preservation and reconstruction of the Mission began through efforts of the County of Santa Barbara, the State of California, the National Park Service, and the Civilian Conservation Corps. 

This collection shows the neglect and decay of the adobe buildings at  La Purisima  Mission through the lens of history.



La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
8
 

Culture Lab Manifesto Collection: A Culture of Beauty

This collection was created by Aira Matin, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Aira applied one of our Culture Lab Manifesto tenets, "A Culture of Beauty: Who gets to decide what counts as beautiful? Question aesthetic classifications and priorities," in her search for objects that may add to, challenge or spark this dialogue. Below is a statement of her process and inspiration for this collection, and may support classroom discussions on race, gender, inclusion and social media. 

"A glance at how the aesthetics of Asian Pacific American cultures have been presented, embraced, celebrated, and manipulated in society. For this collection, I went through searches around Asian Pacific American cultures to look at both things that were considered traditionally beautiful and things with beauty not as direct. Examining objects from paintings to designed plates helped to explore what was considered beautiful in many different lenses. The goal was to look at and analyze the presence of beauty in different forms, from stereotypes in Hollywood to architecture, and interpret what these symbolized for a larger society." --Aira Matin

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
26
 

Culture Lab Manifesto Collection: A Culture of Action

This collection was created by Aira Matin, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Aira applied one of our Culture Lab Manifesto tenets, "A Culture of Action: Stay woke. We have a social contract with one another to protect the vulnerable and ensure human rights for everyone," in her search for objects that may add to, challenge or spark this dialogue. Below is a statement of her process and inspiration for this collection, and may support classroom discussions on race, immigration, migration, activism, gender, inclusion and social media.

"What were the different forms of marginalization and discrimination against Asian Pacific American communities, and how did such oppression lead to action being taken to assert their place as equal citizens in the United States? For this collection, I examined different principles and foundations for oppression and prejudice against Asian Pacific Americans, as well as the different ways that these communities took action against such marginalization to represent themselves as equal Americans." --Aira Matin

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
23
 

Exploring Complexity: Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way

In this activity, students will analyze an artwork that celebrates the idea of Manifest Destiny and western expansion - Emanuel Leutze's 1861 mural study for Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way, the final version of which rests in the U.S. Capitol Building.  Through the use of two Project Zero Thinking routines - What makes you say that?, a Visible Thinking routine for interpretation and justification; and Parts, Purposes, Complexities, an Agency by Design routine for looking closely - students will consider what message this painting conveys, how choices made by the artist convey that message, as well as what perspectives are portrayed and what perspectives are missing.  After looking critically, students will watch a video and learn from senior curator Richard Murray how to read this painting and what messages/images they may have missed.

This activity can be used as an entry point or supplement in studying westward expansion, the idea of Manifest Destiny, how public perspectives are shaped, and more.  Resources to extend this activity include: a website about the final mural located in the U.S. Capitol Building and a Smithsonian American Art Museum lesson plan about both the mural study and the final mural.

Keywords: Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze, manifest destiny, westward expansion

Tess Porter
7
 

What Makes You Say That?: Civil War Photograph

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "What makes you say that?," students will investigate a photograph from the Civil War taken by the studio of Mathew Brady, one of the most prominent American photographers of the 19th century.  The Civil War was the first major war captured on camera and photographs, like this one, played a pivotal role in shaping public perceptions of the conflict.

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying soldiers' experiences during the Civil War, photography's effect on public perspectives about war, and more.  Resources to extend this activity include: a Smithsonian American Art Museum lesson plan investigating this and other photographs from the Civil War, a blog post discussing connections between Civil War photography and President Abraham Lincoln, a Smithsonian Magazine article about Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner, a Learning Lab collection on Alexander Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the War, and an article discussing the National Portrait Gallery's recent exhibition The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.

Keywords: photo, battlefield, inquiry strategy

Tess Porter
8
 

Behind Design: Exploring Culture Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors and/or restrictions influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, traditions, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation?  *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
29
 

Brittania's 1920's Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to describe the time and artifacts of the 20's. This collection shows symbols that represented the 1920's particularly the areas of:

  • Prohibition
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • Fundamentalism
  • New Roles for Women
  • Jazz Music
Brittania Fonder
15
 

The Road to Civil Rights

Sarah Billups
9
 

Key Moments in WWII: What makes you say that?

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "What makes you say that?," students will investigate two photographs, taken from different angles, of Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and General Yoshijiro Umezu aboard the USS Missouri as they signed the surrender that would officially end WWII.

Keywords: world war 2, world war ii, general macarthur, carl mydans, primary source, ww2, japanese instrument of surrender, potsdam declaration, inquiry strategy

#visiblethinking

Tess Porter
4
 

Representation of Australian Culture

How has Australia, the Australian people and the Australian culture been represented to people overseas? How do people from other nations view Australia, the Australian people and the Australian culture?
Colin Radici
8
 

Slavery

Stimulus for art work or essay on slavery in America. Students  to create a drawing or painting using images to portray the the pain of slavery. Student can select a variety of media.  The essay could be based upon the first person experience  looking through the eyes of a slave.

Mark Poore
8
 

Access Series: People, Friends, and Family--Together and Alone

This topical collection of people—together in groups with friends or families (mother, father, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin, grandmother, and grandfather); different genders, ages, and ethnicities, and "selfies"—was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
134
97-120 of 1,274 Collections