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Found 426 Collections

 

Deep Ocean. Mariana Trench

Ani Flandreau i3
6
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 9-10 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
18
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 6-8 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 6-8 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 9-10 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.    

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

 Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

Design Case Study: Eone Bradley Timepiece

Explore the design story behind the Bradley Timepiece in Cooper Hewitt's collection and learn about empathy, creative problem solving, inclusive design, and the design process used to bring it to life.

Objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with the design process
  • Understand what the steps of the design process might look like in application 
  • Connect design objects to the design process

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
12
 

Designing Alternative Energy Solutions

Climate change is a huge issue facing our society. Our students have expressed tremendous concerns about the global impact of the climate crisis.

As part of this learning lab, student teams are tasked with designing and prototyping an alternative energy solution for NYC.

Before embarking on their own designs, students will use the resources to learn about earlier climate campaigns, what scientists and engineers are doing today and will explore models, prototypes and solutions that are already existent.

sara gottlieb
28
 

Designing For Accessibility–Tova Kleiner

This Learning Lab showcases different examples of accessible design in order to provide a fuller understanding of what designing for accessibility can look like. The collection shown here includes designs that address physical, cognitive, and emotional barriers that impact the lives of people with disabilities. This Learning Lab explores design for the blind, for wheelchair accessibility, for the elderly, and for people with autism. Through the DesignPrep Scholars program, I have learned about various design disciplines and focuses. DesignPrep Scholars gave me the opportunity to meet several inspirational designers and do many design projects. Throughout this experience, I have been especially drawn to design that is inclusive and accessible. This Learning Lab is the culmination of my work at DesignPrep Scholars and displays what I have learned about accessible design.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
22
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins

This topical collection explores the life of Command Module Pilot Michael Collins; it includes images, artifact images, and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Collins' life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included. 

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut

Christina Ferwerda
8
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong

This topical collection explores the life of Mission Commander Neil A. Armstrong; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn influential aspects of Armstrong's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Armstrong, space, space race, astronaut


Christina Ferwerda
11
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin

This topical collection explores the life of Lunar Module Pilot  Buzz Aldrin; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Aldrin's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut



Christina Ferwerda
6
 

Destination Moon: NASA Art

Established in 1962, the NASA Artists Cooperation Program gave several artists unrestricted access to several NASA facilities. The goal was to communicate the emotional tone and the cultural significance of space exploration.

This collection uses the "Connect Extend Challenge" visible thinking strategy developed by Project Zero at Harvard University. This strategy encourages students to make connections between new ideas and prior knowledge. It also encourages them to make a personal connection to an artwork or topic.

This lesson helps teachers create connections between works of art and the study of space exploration, and to help teachers use art as a force for developing students’ critical thinking.  

Observe and discuss the first image as a class. Use the "Connect Extend Challenge" to discuss the image as a class. Ask the following: 

  • How is the artwork or object connected to something you know about?
  • What new ideas or impressions do you have that extended your thinking in new directions?
  • What is challenging or confusing? What do you wonder about?

Provide any background knowledge that enhances the conversation, using the metadata information about the NASA Artists Cooperation Program. 

Next, divide the students into 4 groups. Have them use the same questions to discuss one of the 4 images that deals the Apollo 11 launch. Wrap-up the discussion by having each group share out key thoughts and responses. Repeat the same process with the 4 images that represent Mission Control (note, Mission Control Images are from a selection of Apollo missions). 

Finally, students should choose one of the final 4 images to investigate, using the "Connect Extend Challenge" to guide their exploration. Their work could be shared verbally in a paired group, or written as a personal essay. 


Christina Ferwerda
13
 

Destination Moon: Suiting Up for Space

How did the space suit come to look the way it does? From the United States Navy's Mark IV pressure suit to the Apollo AL7 model, this collection explores its evolution. Investigate the hotspots in each image, and watch the videos included. Try to put yourself in the place of an astronaut - what are their needs, and wants? 

Next, investigate the roadmap for the developing Mars One mission. How will a Mars mission differ from the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs?

After exploring the collection, see if you can redefine the "space suit" problem for the next generation of space explorers - specifically those going to Mars.  Will astronauts need more mobility? More protection? What insights did you gain from looking at this collection? Write down the problem and any critical information gained. 

Additional Activities: 

1. Come up with as many solutions as you can to the defined problem. Don't worry about testing them all - let your imagination run wild - and challenge yourself to come up with lots of different solutions. 

2. Talk with a partner to see which solution has the most merit between you both. Refine your idea based on this conversation. 

Finally, prototype! Use simple, inexpensive materials to model your design. 

Christina Ferwerda
7
 

Disabled Doesn't Mean Unable

George Pagano

Four – Six 45 minute Class Periods

Lesson Overview:

This lesson plan unit is built around the exploration of identity for individuals with disabilities. Students will be asked to examine several items in the collection and answer the following essential questions:  How can unfair/fair depictions of an individual with a disability affect their identity?  How can positive depictions empower an individual?

This theme will be combined with a component of advocacy and change: How can one advocate to make a difference? What causes a change in one's belief system? How can a portrait or image inspire change? How can a portrait or image document change?

Lessons are designed for an 8th grade interdisciplinary team approach: English, social studies, and art class. The plan for this unit includes the synthesis of visual images within the historical context of the promotion of rights for individuals with disabilities.

The subject of self-identity - the recognition of one's potential and qualities as an individual will be explored as well.  

George Pagano
16
 

Diversity in Plants and Animals

Learn about the diversity of plants and animals in different habitats.
SmithsonianScienceAshley
22
 

E-Textiles

This teaching collection gives an introduction to e-textiles, which incorporates sewing with circuitry. Students will first learn the basics LED circuitry, then create their very own wearable tech. Extension activities include creating paper circuits with magnetic copper tape and magnetic "throwies".



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
13
 

Eagle

Bald eagle skull.

eunika burroughs
3
 

Early Alphabet Books

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Annette Hibbert Nelson
13
 

Earth Day: A View from Above

The people of Earth didn't see a photo of our planet until the late 1960s. Photos of Earth changed the way we think about our planet. This fast-paced webcast will look at the beginnings of Earth Day and how a better understanding of our place in the universe has evolved through photographic scientific discoveries.

April 22, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Earth Day: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Are we living in the Plastic Age?. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Education 131

Various works/pieces.

Ivan Murillo
3
 

Edward O. Wilson: Ant Biologist

What is an entomologist? Through the study of the Edward O. Wilson portrait, our students will explore the career of an ant biologist, study the plants and insects in our community, and create a self-portrait demonstrating their understanding.

Objectives: 

  • Students will be able to define the role of an entomologist.
  • Students will understand the concept of biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to classify a living creature as "insect" or "not an insect."
  • Students will observe and be able to describe local insects.
  • Students will understand the concept of habitat.
  • Students will observe and be able to describe  native plants.

Assessment: Students will create a self-portrait with a variety of native insects and plants similar to the E. O. Wilson portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019

#NPGteach

Jill Johnson
8
 

Engineering Flight

This is a master collection designed to be copied and adapted to your individual classroom needs. Included are three scalable student activities that teach students engineering skills using methods similar to those that made the Wright brothers pioneers of aviation. Feel free to pick and choose from the activities in creating your own collections:

1. The Four Forces of Flight

In this student activity, students will briefly go over the four forces of flight (lift, drag, weight, and thrust) and put them to the test in the Paper Airplane Challenge! This activity is suitable for Primary/Intermediate grade levels.

2. Engineering the Wright Way

The second student activity is an online interactive, "Engineering the Wright Way"*, where students will develop engineering skills to design and test all the different components of an airplane based on the the Wrights' methodology. Students can write down a save code generated in the interactive to store their progress and return to finish the activity later. This activity is suitable for Intermediate/Middle grade levels.

3. Take a Wright Flight

The third student activity is an online flight simulator to learn three controls of flight: yaw, pitch, and roll. The final segment is an online interactive** to test fly the original Wright Flyer in conditions similar to that cold December morning when the Wrights first achieved flight, using direct 3D scans of the original Wright Flyer made by the Smithsonian. This activity is suitable for all grades.


*The "Engineering the Wright Way" lesson plan and activity were created by the National Air and Space Museum, courtesy of the Alcoa Foundation.

**The Wright Brothers Flyer activity was created by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
19
 

Engineering Flight

This is a master collection designed to be copied and adapted to your individual classroom needs. Included are three scalable student activities that teach students engineering skills using methods similar to those that made the Wright brothers pioneers of aviation. Feel free to pick and choose from the activities in creating your own collections:

1. The Four Forces of Flight

In this student activity, students will briefly go over the four forces of flight (lift, drag, weight, and thrust) and put them to the test in the Paper Airplane Challenge! This activity is suitable for Primary/Intermediate grade levels.

2. Engineering the Wright Way

The second student activity is an online interactive, "Engineering the Wright Way"*, where students will develop engineering skills to design and test all the different components of an airplane based on the the Wrights' methodology. Students can write down a save code generated in the interactive to store their progress and return to finish the activity later. This activity is suitable for Intermediate/Middle grade levels.

3. Take a Wright Flight

The third student activity is an online flight simulator to learn three controls of flight: yaw, pitch, and roll. The final segment is an online interactive** to test fly the original Wright Flyer in conditions similar to that cold December morning when the Wrights first achieved flight, using direct 3D scans of the original Wright Flyer made by the Smithsonian. This activity is suitable for all grades.


*The "Engineering the Wright Way" lesson plan and activity were created by the National Air and Space Museum, courtesy of the Alcoa Foundation.

**The Wright Brothers Flyer activity was created by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Carmella Doty
19
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