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Found 810 Collections

 

In the Eye of the Beholder: Looking at Women’s Portrayal in Portraiture During the Suffrage Movement

This collection uses portraits from the National Portrait Gallery's exhibition, Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence. These resources are intended to facilitate classroom discussion about how women were portrayed through art during the suffragist movement. Participants are encouraged to think about who creates portraits, what motivations may exist in their creation, how the portraits were used within the movement, and their potential impact, intended or not, on the suffragists' cause. 

Christy Ting
11
 

Native American Unit

SAAM

Cristi Marchetti
5
 

Exploring Social Justice with “One Life: Marian Anderson” and “In Mid-Sentence.”

This learning lab is rooted in exploring the concept of social justice and activism through biography and curation. This learning lab explores the power of one's narrative being shown through multiple artifacts in order to paint a bigger and more accurate picture of their role in social justice and activism. 

#NPG

Asia Stanislaus
36
 

Protest Then and Now

This collection includes images of different types of protests from the women's suffrage movement to contemporary issues. #ethnicstudies

Melanie Kirchhof
4
 

The Intersection of Race and Disability

#ethnicstudies

Amy Prescott
32
 

Ethnic Studies

Primary source set asks students to examine whose voice is valued in U.S.A. 

#ethnicstudies

Jennifer Smith
5
 

From 1619 to the American Civil Rights Movement to Today

This collection brings together the New York Times Podcast 1619 (Episode 1, "The Fight for a True Democracy") and Smithsonian resources to support my 7th graders as we begin our unit on the American Civil Rights Movement. Later in the unit, the students will read March, a graphic novel based on the experience of Congressman John Lewis during the Civil Rights Movement. In order for the students to understand why the Civil Rights Movement was necessary, they must first understand the history that led to it. This collection does not, by any means, provide a complete or comprehensive history. The podcast provides an historical overview and will serve as a jumping off point for further research. The visual artwork, poetry, articles, and films included at the end serve to provide additional perspectives and opportunities for exploration. The students will develop their own research questions inspired by the thinking they've done throughout this collection and may use the additional resources provided to begin their independent research. A PowerPoint lesson on developing research questions is included.

The collection is organized into six lessons. The first five follow the same structure: students will explore a piece of visual art using Ten Times Two and Unveiling Stories, using the handout to record their ideas. Students will then listen to a portion of the podcast and use Think, Puzzle, Explore to document their thinking and record questions for further research. After listening to the podcast, they will return to their Unveiling Stories handout and add any new thinking. The sixth lesson brings the students from history to the present and asks them to consider the 2014 artwork New Age of Slavery by Patrick Campbell using Ten Times Two and Unveiling Stories. They will also listen to an NPR report on Black Lives Matter. Following the same format as previous lessons, they will document their thinking and questions about what they've heard using the Think, Puzzle, Explore handout and then return to their Unveiling Stories handout to add new ideas. 

Please note that the podcast link (including daily listening timestamps), the Unveiling Stories handout, and the Think, Puzzle, Explore handout are all linked at the start of this collection, but will be used each day (see daily lesson plans).  

#GoGlobal

Marissa McCauley
77
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

Find "artifacts" that people used at that time and learn and explain why they were important and how they were used

Cole Dastrup
10
 

Shapes

Exploring shapes with preschoolers

Alix Fitzpatrick
18
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

Exploring significant events, people, and movements of the 1920s and 1930s through artifacts from that time period.

E. Garmon
10
 

Meaningful objects

Can objects have meaning? What is symbolically meaningful in your life?  Through photography and text, use aesthetic choices to make your meaning visually strong. 

The first image is from the Smithsonian collection. The other images are from students at Horace Greeley High School in Chappaqua, NY.

louise brady
9
 

Inter/sected - LGBTQ + Asian Pacific Americans

Inter/sected, was a photo exhibit on display at the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center July 5 to September 22, 2019, that celebrated the intersected identities of Queer Asian Pacific Americans. The AARC worked with local Austin photographer Ben Aqua. Ben has titled their photo series “Slaysians,” portraits of LGBTQ+ Asians/Pacific Islanders on their Instagram account at @b3naqua. Ben's pronouns are they/them/theirs.

Teachers and students may use this collection to discuss intersectionality, Asian American identities, gender spectrum/non binary, culture and resistance to assimilation, and expressions through art.  Articles, photographs, and supplemental film, podcast and archive resources are included for further analysis on queer Asian American experiences in the US.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: asian americans, queer, LGBTQ, intersectionality, gender, queer

 #EthnicStudies

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
16
 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Caminos Teen Leadership Program

CAMINOS is an immersive; one year long paid internship empowering Austin-area Teens to carve their own path in the creative arts. Students work alongside ESB-MACC professionals on a variety of community oriented activities, projects, and exhibitions.

#ethnicstudies

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
13
 

Beauty/Truth/Revealing/and Concealing: Adding complexity to a literary analysis (Wrap up lesson with "A Doll's House," by Henrik Ibsen) #SAAMTeach

While this lesson revolves around Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House," it can be used in conjunction with any work of literature featuring strong characters - the type who generate potentially negative reactions among students, such as: "I hate him... There's nothing good about ______....he's the villain... she's the hero, etc." The lesson is designed to push students out of their comfort zone, give themselves permission to speculate and entertain a variety of viewpoints, and as a means to step away from the literature they just read, then step back in with perhaps a more open-minded approach.

This is a discussion-heavy lesson, requiring some patience on the part of the teacher not to jump in and fill in the gaps. But after completing it the first, second, and then third time, I could definitely sense the students were now more apt to be "risk takers" and more "open minded" with their interpretations and insight.

Step by step instructions follow in the "Notes to Other Users" section. #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
8
 

Lord of the Flies - How and Why?

A perspective on how and why savagery and disorder take over the boys in our story, and the warning author William Golding wanted to deliver through this tale to the rest of the world.

Kayleagh Nutter
8
 

Lord of the Flies - How and Why?

A perspective on how and why savagery and disorder take over the boys in our story, and the warning author William Golding wanted to deliver through this tale to the rest of the world.

Mary Marotta
8
 

"Hyphenated Americans": When “Bricklayer Bill” Won the 1917 Boston Marathon, It Was a Victory For All Irish Americans

This collection explores the notion of hyphenated Americans, through the story of one man, William Kennedy, an American of Irish descent, born in New York in the late 19th century, who went on to win the Boston Marathon in 1918. Bill's nephew, in writing about his uncle, said, "When “Bricklayer Bill” Won the 1917 Boston Marathon, It Was a Victory For All Irish Americans." What did he mean?

To aid discussion, included in this collection are images, a cartoon, several articles, a story fro WBUR, and one thinking routine from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking - "Step In, Step Out, Step Back" - to "encourage learners to take other people’s perspectives, recognize that understanding others is an ongoing process, and understand that our efforts to take perspective can reveal as much about ourselves as they can about the people we are seeking to understand."

This collection complements chapter 6 ("The Flight From Ireland") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 2: What is the history?, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies


Philippa Rappoport
8
 

Facing Genocide: The US Response to the Holocaust

My aunt remembers sitting at the kitchen table as a child while her parents, my grandparents, read the Yiddish newspaper, Der Tag. Often one would start crying, saying, nishta ("gone"), "this one nishta; that one nishta," in response to the paper's lists of towns in Europe overrun by the Nazis. 

This collection examines the US response to the Holocaust, pairing historical documentation with four thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials - "Unveiling Stories," :Think, Feel, Care," "The 3 Y's," and "Circles of Action," - to prompt students to ask important questions about our individual and collective responsibility to humanity. 

Included here are photographs, documentation, and resources from the National Museum of American History and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM), including a teaching resource and USHMM's online exhibition, Americans and the Holocaust, which examines "the motives, pressures, and fears that shaped Americans’ responses to Nazism, war, and genocide." Examined with thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials, students will explore complex and deeply troubling issues that continue to have relevance today. 

This collection complements chapter 14 ("World War II and America's Ethnic Problem") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies


Philippa Rappoport
19
 

Artifacts tell stories of the Encounter and Frontier

A collection of artifacts from which our students will choose an object of study for their first project cycle. Student swill be using historical, scientific, literary, mathematical and artistic techniques to help their chosen artifact tell a story of an encounter in history between two groups and/or cultures.

Andrew Meyers
47
 

Activism and Change: Clara Lemlich and the New York Shirtwaist Strike of 1909

This teaching collection asks students to consider photographs and documentation about early 20th-century Jewish immigrant activist Clara Lemlich (1886-1982, leader of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and founder of the Progressive Women’s Councils), in the larger context of New York's Garment Industry, the New York Shirtwaist Strike of 1909, and the 1911 Triangle Waist Factory fire. By pairing historical documentation with three thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials - "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "Think, Feel, Care," and "Circles of Action," - the collection encourages students to explore complexity and perspective, and fosters a disposition to participate. 

Included here are photographs, documentation, and resources from the Jewish Women's Archive's Encyclopedia of Jewish Women, the Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives at Cornell University's Industrial and Labor Relations School, the Tenement Museum, and the National Museum of American History. 

This collection pairs well with chapter 11 ("Jews are Pushed from Russia") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

Asian Americans with Disabilities in America

This collection was created by Mark Ferrer, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. "My name is Mark Ferrer. I was the first deaf intern at APAC. I practically researched issues that I thought might help people with disabilities like me. I was resourceful and used the opportunities to create awareness for Asians with disabilities. I entitled my research as Asian Americans with Disabilities in America."


About the Asian Americans with Disabilities in America, Asian is one of the fastest-growing racial groups in the U.S. and the growth rate of Asians with disabilities progressively swelling (worsening). They were being categorized and called the handicapped, the disabled and the feeble-minded. The language barriers, not enough support, being the model minority and confusion between two cultures were only a few of the many challenges they faced. It was during the 19th and 20th centuries that they suffer from discrimination but became beneficiaries when ADA was passed in 1990. It is truly remarkable that this collection will give you information and awareness about the status of the Asians and disabled in America.

Mark Ferrer
20
 

Human Growth

clarissa guzman
3
 

Ancient religious architectures VS. Modern religious architectures

Inside this Ancient religious architectures VS. Modern religious architecture collection, I will be showing various religious architectures/buildings from the ancient times vs the modern religious building that we have right now. The purpose of creating this collection is because I want to distinguish the difference between the religious architecture around the world and compare it to what the architectures look like back in the old time, since both are religious building, it both are dedicated to a specific goddess, but their outside look looks totally different. The history of architecture is concerned with religious buildings other than any other type. People use the buildings such as temples, churches, mosques, etc. as a place to worship and sometimes shelter. Those religious architectures are also known as the Sacred architectures, many cultures and countries devoted their resources to their sacred buildings to show their respect for their goddess and to worship them. We don’t just see them in ancient history. Today, there is still building being built in the modern world purely for religious reasons, such as churches and temples. In this collection, I will be showing a mix of modern religious buildings and ancient buildings, I will be comparing the two different centuries architectures through pictures.

#AHMC2019

Jenny Chou
18
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