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Found 374 Collections

 

Conflict and Compromise: Religion in America (NHD @ the National Museum of American History)

This collection includes objects and resources related to Religionin Early America. The many peoples who called early America home represented a great variety of spiritual traditions. Additional resources can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.eduand History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

Each National History Day collection from the National Museum of American History includes selected resources to support NHD projects under the 2018 theme - Conflict and Compromise. #NHD2018. This collection is by no means comprehensive, but should be used as a place of inspiration for new projects or source of additional information for ones already in the works. 

#NHD

National Museum of American History
32
 

Conflict and Compromise: The Vietnam War

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2018, "Conflict and Compromise in History."

These resources - including protest posters, archival photographs, interviews, artwork, and articles - explore the topic of the Vietnam War from multiple perspectives. Resources highlight politics, the experience of soldiers, anti-war protests, and artwork created in reaction to the Vietnam War. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2018. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2018 in the description!

Tags: ho chi-minh; lyndon b. johnson; richard nixon; walter cronkite; henry kissinger; veteran; oral history; viet cong; protest; peace; 50s; 60s; 70s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD

Susan Ogilvie
84
 

Conflict, Identity, and Place in American Art (2019)

This collection contains a selection of artworks related to the themes of conflict, identity, and place.  Teachers can use these artworks for a variety of purposes; here, we use them as a catalyst for discussion, with an extended version of Project Zero's See, Think, Wonder thinking routine.  In small groups or as a classroom, have students select one artwork they find meaningful or interesting and discuss the following:

  1. Why did you pick this artwork?  
  2. What do you see?  Name specific aspects of the artwork you notice.
  3. What do you think about what you see?
  4. What does this artwork make you wonder
  5. Optional: How might the artwork connect to the themes of conflict, identity, and place?

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection contains artwork selected by Phoebe Hillemann, Teacher Institutes Educator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, featured in the 2019 Smithsonian American Art Museum Summer Institute for Teachers, "Teaching the Humanities through Art."  

These artworks serve as foundational museum resources in lesson concepts that are accessible by searching the Smithsonian Learning Lab with the hashtag: #SAAMTeach.

Ashley Naranjo
40
 

Copley & the Art of Revolutionary Figures

This learning lab consists of portraits painted by John Singleton Copley, one of America's first painters. The subjects included all played a role either prior to or during the revolution.

Arthur Glaser
14
 

Crazy Quilts

Images support learning in primary grade textile lessons.

Jean-Marie Galing
5
 

Crazy Quilts

Images support learning in primary grade textile lessons.

Tracy Dumais
5
 

Crime Scenes in History

Smithsonian has a number of incredible resources focusing on famous crime scenes across history, techniques, and tools.

Jodi Halligan M.Ed
9
 

Cultural Series: Bahrain

A general topical overview collection of Bahrain (and Arabian Gulf-related) objects in the Smithsonian collections. Stamps are featured, as well as the historic pearling industry; Endangered species are described, as well as articles about the ancient Dilmun culture and other archaeological finds.

Tracie Spinale
30
 

Cultural Series: Georgia (Country)

A collection of Smithsonian resources about the county of Georgia, in Europe. Features geography, ecology, folklife, music, and culture.

Tracie Spinale
16
 

Culture and Aesthetics Meet Physics: Why Soviet and American Spacesuits Look Different

This collection serves as a preview for the fifth of six seminar sessions in the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.”

National Air and Space Museum curator Cathleen Lewis will discuss objects from the Space Race gallery, in particular how spacesuits from the USSR and the United States indicate differing cultural and aesthetic answers to similar engineering challenges. 

Resources included in this collection have been recommended by the presenter for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

Curation...The Latest (and Equally Important!) C for Education

This collection is a curated collection of images that can be used with a lesson plan on curation. Each of the images has some possible connection to a social justice theme and the question asked by the creator of the collection is, "How might we approach conversations about curation and social justice?" Each of these images adds a unique and interesting dimension to a conversation about curation, the people whose stories are selected for view, and how those stories are empowered and/or disempowered by the stories that they are surrounded by. How do we make decisions about these topics? What do we do when we are asked to include in a curated collection pieces that change the story we might want to tell? How do we deal with the multi-faceted stories and sometimes contradictory stories of the people we select for our collections? 

It is important to ask these questions and have dialogues with students about how we come to our conclusions, make our decisions, and wrestle with these concepts. In a world of tweets and ever expanding stories/information it is important sometimes to talk about how we work with the realities of physical spaces where there isn't always enough wall real estate to highlight everyone all of the time. In those situations, how decisions are made, who is brought to the forefront (and who is not), and how our own beliefs/biases/views of the world play into those decisions all matter. 

How might you curate this collection in many ways? Who is still missing and why does it matter that we ask the questions at all? 

While this is intended to be a companion collection to a lesson on curation, the questions above may stand on their own. This collection is intended to be the beginning of a conversation, and not a stand alone collection; however, the lesson is also available in the collection as a downloadable PDF. 

#NPGTeach

Sean Wybrant
40
 

Daniel Boone and American Ginseng: Truth and Legend

Who was Daniel Boone? Was he more than a stereotypical American frontier hero? Explore Daniel Boone and his relationship to the native plant, ginseng, through this collection and series of activities. 

Daniel Boone (1734-1820) spent much of his adult life blazing trails through the American wilderness. Through exploration and opening the wilderness, Boone and others were able to exploit its many rich resources, including the profitable plant American ginseng. He rose to the status of American legend, becoming known as someone who braved hardship and danger to bring the earth's resources to the market. The legend of Daniel Boone and his-lost-ginseng illustrates the way such stories can reflect historical fact. But become exaggerated or distorted through many generations of story tellers, and, now, via the internet. History and fiction become intertwined. 

While the days of American pioneers are long gone, people still search for and gather wild ginseng in the mountainous regions that Boone frequented. Learn more about Boone's adventures and American ginseng throughout this collection. Be sure to click the Information icon to learn more about each item. 

To learn more about Daniel Boone and his efforts to explore the wilderness, visit the Learning Lab collection -The Wilderness Road- .

Julia Eanes
25
 

Depictions of Children

Viewers will consider how images of children have changed over the past 300 years. Artwork selections include a large variety of individual and group portraits of both male and female sitters/subjects in a variety of styles for the purpose of analyzing the elements of portraiture (expression, pose, clothing, hairstyle, setting, objects, etc...) in order to help students gain a better understanding of social norms in the context of place and time. This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018Learning to look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Michelle Zimmerman
60
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins

This topical collection explores the life of Command Module Pilot Michael Collins; it includes images, artifact images, and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Collins' life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included. 

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut

Christina Ferwerda
8
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong

This topical collection explores the life of Mission Commander Neil A. Armstrong; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn influential aspects of Armstrong's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Armstrong, space, space race, astronaut


Christina Ferwerda
11
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin

This topical collection explores the life of Lunar Module Pilot  Buzz Aldrin; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Aldrin's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut



Christina Ferwerda
6
 

Destination Moon: EO 10925, Civil Rights, and the Space Program

This collection of resources uses oral histories as well as photographs and articles to explore race relations and the impact of Executive Order 10925 at NASA. Signed by President John F. Kennedy on March 6, 1961, EO 10925 required government contractors to "take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed and that employees are treated during employment without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin."

Resources in this collection -  photographs and articles as well as oral histories - are compiled to supplement the SITES traveling exhibit Destination Moon. This collection is not comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection is closely associated with the "Destination Moon" traveling exhibit. For more information see https://airandspace.si.edu/exh...



Christina Ferwerda
10
 

Destination Moon: Origins of the Space Race

This topical collection introduces events that shaped the origin of the Space Race; its connections to World War II, rocketry, nuclear development, and the Cold War. 

After exploring the collection, students will have a better understanding of how the Space Race evolved from a specific group of geopolitical events. This collection introduces figures from American politics and outlines international events that pushed the United States to  mobilize around the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs. 

Students begin by watching the overview video. The resources that follow include metadata summaries, quiz questions, and hotspots to draw attention to details in each resource, and provide an overview of the complex geopolitical situation. This collection is best used as a primer to the space race and could be enhanced by further discussion. 

Christina Ferwerda
14
 

Destination Moon: The Mighty Saturn V

The Saturn V is the most powerful rocket flown to date, but how did it actually work? this collection investigates the three stages of the Saturn V rocket, as well as the Instrument Unit. By making comparisons between the engines and computer located on the Saturn V and familiar technologies, students will gain a better understanding of the power and function of the mighty Saturn V. 

This collection also uses and familiarizes students with several Earth and Space science terms. When exploring this collection, discuss and provide students with the following vocabulary list: 

Thrust, stage, orbit, velocity, combustion, vacuum

Christina Ferwerda
9
 

Digital tools for Social Impact

This collections includes examples of digital and interactive design presenting innovation in technology-based media and involving mobile applications, data visualization, mapping, augmented/virtual reality and robotics, to examine social justice issues and/or provide a social service. 

Projects & case studies demonstrate how the strategy and craft of design, as well as digital storytelling, are aimed to effect change in communities throughout the world.




Chantal Fischzang

Assistant Professor
Department of Arts, Culture & Media
Rutgers University-Newark

Co-Director
Design Consortium
Visual Means




#socialImpactdesign #designforgood #digitaldesign #digitalstorytelling #digitaltools #servicedesign #interactivedesign #datavisualization #socialjustice


Chantal Fischzang
22
 

Dolores del Rio

Dolores del Rio was a Mexican born film actress who stared in many Hollywood films beginning in the 1920's. She was one of the first Latin American movies stars in Hollywood and was renowned for her skill and beauty. She began her career in the silent films of the 1920's and 1930's and successfully adapted to the talking films of later decades. This collection asks the student to consider the significance of her role as an early icon of biculturalism and complete an exercise in perspective taking. 

Information adapted from The New York Times obituary on Dolores del Rio, April 13, 1983. Retreived from https://www.nytimes.com/1983/04/13/obituaries/dolores-del-rio-77-is-dead-film-star-in-us-and-mexico.html

#ethnicstudies 

Meredith Woolard
10
 

Dolores Huerta: Images, Videos, and "One Life" Exhibition

This topical collection explores the contributions to American history and society of Civil Rights activist Dolores Huerta, the "co-architect" with Cesar Chavez of the American Farm Workers Movement. The images and resources can be used as discussion or writing prompts in a variety of courses, including history, culture, language, and literature. Included in this collection are images from the exhibition, "One Life: Dolores Huerta," a bilingual video with National Portrait Gallery curator Taína Caragol, footage of an interview program with Dolores Huerta at the museum, and an NPR interview with Dolores Huerta in January 2017.

#LatinoHAC #BecauseOfHerStory

Philippa Rappoport
19
 

Dong Kingman

This collection focuses on Dong Kingman (1911-2000), an American watercolorist best known for his urban and landscape paintings, magazine covers, and scenery work for multiple films. Dong Kingman was born in Oakland, California, to Chinese immigrants and moved to Hong Kong when he was a child. There, he studied both Asian and European painting techniques before returning to the United States during the Great Depression. Artwork in this collection includes works created for the Works Progress Administration, the NASA Art Program, and Time magazine. Also included is a short documentary, directed by two-time Academy Award winner James Wong Howe, and Dong Kingman's obituary from the New York Times.

This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: chinese american, china

#APA2018

Tess Porter
21
 

Doorways & Passages

Doorways are the transition point from one place to another.  They can be functional, decorative, symbolic, or a combination of all three.  Work with a partner to view and discuss a selection of doorways.

  • What does it look like?
  • What is it made of?
  • Where do you think it leads?
  • How does it impact the viewer or person who might want to enter/exit?

ART MAKING CHALLENGES: 

  • Design a doorway or passageway that symbolizes what happens inside.
  • Design a doorway or passageway that links a physical place to an imaginary one.
  • Design a doorway to represent a transition from one period of your life to another. 

Jean-Marie Galing
31
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