Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(145)
(229)
(337)
(289)
(350)
(12)
(194)
(167)
(54)
(167)
(51)
(40)

Found 374 Collections

 

Exploration of Different Gold Mining Tools and Techniques

Historical images of placer gold mining tools and techniques used in Columbia, CA may be used for learning different placer gold mining techniques. These visual aids may provide a better understanding of how the types of mining tools changed over time. In the early years of the gold rush, miners traveled with very few items; some which included a gold pan, pick and shovel. As more gold was discovered, mining parties established mining camps or tent towns. The cradle or rocker box was used as towns developed. Further development of mining camps brought in the use of long toms, sluice boxes and water diversions created for mining.

columbiastatehistoricpark
7
 

California Gold Rush Era Mining Technique Photos

Mining techniques evolved over time with development of larger mining companies. These photos also show cultural diversity during the California Gold Rush. 

columbiastatehistoricpark
14
 

The Smithsonian's Caribbean Indigenous Legacies Project: Celebrating Taíno Culture

This topical collection contains information about the Smithsonian's Caribbean Indigenous Legacies Project: Celebrating Taíno Culture, with links to the Heye Center exhibition, "Taíno : Native Heritage and Identity in the Caribbean," and to a related public program/webcast, "Taíno: A Symposium in Conversation with the Movement," from the National Museum of the American Indian. 

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

California Gold Rush Introduction

A collection complied to assist students and educators with visual aids for educational programs pertaining to the introduction of California Gold Rush History. James Marshall discovered gold in the year of 1848, along the American River, at Sutter's Mill (present day Coloma, California). President Polk, the 11th President of the United States made a landmark announcement to the world of Marshall's discovery. The news from President Polk started one of the largest mass migration of individuals to one place ever in recorded history. Between 1848 and 1852, California's population grew from 14,000 to 223,000. The gold rush was an opportunity for migrants to make a better life for themselves and families. By ship around Cape Horn, by foot through the Isthmus of Panama, or the overland trails by wagon, travels to the Territory of California were long and deadly. Those who survived the journeys fulfilled the dream of Westward migration. These migrations connected cultures from all over the world to develop the diverse population and abundance in opportunity that lives on, in California today.

columbiastatehistoricpark
21
 

Island of the Blue Dolphins

Animals, places, people, etc. mentioned in the novel, Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O'Dell
channa_HasClass
18
 

The California Gold Rush: A Journey to the Goldfields

James Marshall's famous discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill in Colma forever changed the landscape, economy and culture of California due to the mass migrations of 300,000 people. Rumors of gold's discovery spread quickly, and was confirmed by President Polk in an address to Congress. The news spread to countries around the world.

The journey to California was long and dangerous. The three major routes were: around Cape Horn by ship (six to eight months), the Isthmus of Panama (two to three months), and the Overland trail (three to five months). By ship, dangers included: ship wrecks, lack of food and water, seasickness and disease. Ships that survived the long journeys arrived to the ports of San Francisco, where migrants had to continue their journey to the Sierra Nevada foothills.  

Traveling 2,000 miles on the Overland Trail by foot and wagon exposed travelers to other dangers such as misinformed trails, and a lack of food and water. Travelers were exposed to inclimate weather while crossing deadly rivers, deserts, and high mountain passes. Only the very basic necessities including food, water, wagons, stock, hunting tools, blacksmithing tools, clothing, blankets, sewing kits, medical supplies would be taken for the journey.   

On the Overland Trail, many miners joined companies. These companies were made up of people with various skills; such as, carpentry, medicine, navigation, hunting, blacksmithing and wheelwrights. The likelihood of surviving these long and dangerous journeys increased significantly for those individuals who joined companies. If a company survived the journey to California on the Overland Trail, the company also had a higher likelihood of success in gold mining. Individuals within the company could stake multiple gold mining claims and the gold would then be divided among the people of the company. During the gold rush, individuals were only allowed to own one claim.  


columbiastatehistoricpark
16
 

California Gold Rush History: Columbia California's Culture Expressed Through Historic Photos

The culture of Columbia expressed through a collection of historic photos.

columbiastatehistoricpark
19
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin

This topical collection explores the life of Lunar Module Pilot  Buzz Aldrin; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Aldrin's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut



Christina Ferwerda
6
 

Latin American Artists

Latin American works from the Permanent Collection at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University. The works represent a timeline that spans thousands of years from pre colombian to present day.

#LatinoHAC

Mirmac16
28
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins

This topical collection explores the life of Command Module Pilot Michael Collins; it includes images, artifact images, and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn about Collins' life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included. 

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Aldrin, space, space race, astronaut

Christina Ferwerda
8
 

Golden Spike Anniversary

On May 10, 1869, the Central Pacific and Union Pacific rail lines were connected in a highly publicized ceremony attended by railroad laborers, major financial supporters and the press. Led by industrial tycoon, Leland Stanford, the event commemorated the birth of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The completion of the railroad made national news and was lauded as a great economic and cultural success for the U.S. 

Despite the attention given to the event, there remained one group of contributors who were almost entirely left out of being recognized for their integral work to the project; Chinese railroad laborers. Although making up the vast majority of the physical work force behind the railroad, Chinese labor contributions were largely disregarded. This instance was not unique to many early Chinese Americans who faced discrimination, animosity, and degradation not only in rail work, but in almost every industry and facet of life. The hardships for early Chinese in America were exacerbated by the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 which not only prevented further immigration from China to the U.S., it also birthed an impetus to drive out Chinese communities already established.

Through this collection, the work, lives, and experiences of Chinese laborers and migrants are presented as an opportunity to learn more about how some of America's earliest Chinese residents navigated America in the late 19th Century. This collection provides art, ceramics and information that expounds upon the realities of Chinese American life and the First Transcontinental Railroad while ensuring that the Chinese contributions are not forgotten.  By no means an exhaustive resource, this collection allows for an introduction into Chinese contributions to the Transcontinental Railroad and encourages further exploration into the topic.

Jared Tupuola
78
 

Destination Moon Crew Guide: Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong

This topical collection explores the life of Mission Commander Neil A. Armstrong; it includes images, artifact images, video and websites. Through browsing this collection, students will learn influential aspects of Armstrong's life, in order to appreciate how his work as a pilot and astronaut impacted his personal and private affairs.

This collection is inspired by the Unveiling Stories thinking strategy introduced by Harvard's Project Zero, which invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in stories: 

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?

Have students look at each image, video or resource, and read its descriptions. Ask students to think about or respond to any quiz questions included.

Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Armstrong, space, space race, astronaut


Christina Ferwerda
11
 

MicroObservatory: A guide to Observing the Universe

MicroObservatory is a network of automated telescopes that can be controlled over the Internet. In this collection, students will learn how they can control these telescopes themselves, using many of the same technologies that NASA uses to capture astronomical images by controlling telescopes in space. After gathering their very own images of space, students will learn the steps professional astronomers take to process the astronomical masterpieces so often seen from NASA, and then have the opportunity to create their very own!

Erika Wright
6
 

The Race to Space: Understanding the Cold War Context of the Apollo 11 Mission

By using this collection, learners will . . .

  • Use primary sources to understand a range of perspectives on the Space Race.
  • Understand why the United States was concerned about the Soviet space program.
  • Be able to analyze the Cold War era context of the Space Race and draw their own conclusions about the success of the Space Race.
HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
22
 

How did European colonization affect Native Americans?

#TeachingInquiry

Brandon Bates
11
 

Triumph and Tragedy: U.S. Reconstruction, 1865-1877

This collection brings together Smithsonian and other federal resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2019, "Triumph and Tragedy in History." #NHD2019


These resources - including photographs, broadsides, political cartoons, publications, correspondence, ledger books, and government documents - explore the varying experiences, political arguments, and consequences of the period following the American Civil War, known as Reconstruction. Resources highlight the opposing ideas for and against Reconstruction policies - and their consequences - by the federal government and its citizens, including political leaders and activists. Also included are digital resources related to Constitutional Amendments passed during this era, supporting secondary resources, and various cartoons, broadsides, speeches, and imagery portraying the African American response to Reconstruction policies and the promises of citizenship and equal rights. Other primary source documents included provide a glimpse into how Reconstruction may have affected individual lives and businesses, and links to digitized collections (and corresponding transcriptions) of thousands of documents from the U.S. Bureau of Freedmen, Refugees, and Abandoned Lands. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research. 

Tags: Civil War, Reconstruction, U.S. Reconstruction, postwar, South, perspective, politics, southern democrats, Radical Republicans, African Americans, Freedmen's Bureau, Records of the Bureau of Freedmen, Refugees, and Abandoned Lands, art, photographs, political cartoons, military, 19th century, 1800s, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Hiram Revels, amendments, #NHD

Smithsonian Transcription Center
49
 

SENSES SERIES

Aggregate of Learning Lab collections about the Smithsonian collaboration with the Science for Monks and Nuns Program - senses and sensory perception.

Tracie Spinale
11
 

Beautiful Orchids at the Smithsonian

This collection represents some of my personal favorites from the project to digitize more than 8,000 living specimens of the Orchidaceae family, in the Smithsonian Gardens Orchid Collection.

There are thousands (at the time of publishing) orchid specimens available here in the Learning Lab. Find your own favorites using this search.

Learn more in the Smithsonian Insider article, "See thousands of orchids in incredible detail in the Smithsonian’s newly digitized collection."

Darren Milligan
57
 

Crime Scenes in History

Smithsonian has a number of incredible resources focusing on famous crime scenes across history, techniques, and tools.

Jodi Halligan M.Ed
9
 

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" Close-Reading: Making Text-to-Art Connections

The selected artwork and learning lab collection offers a historical approach to the transformation of Native Americans into white culture and society. It serves as a purpose to provoke discussion on the historical context of the Indian Removal Act, and gives students an understanding of the main character’s (from the novel "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian) “modern day” internal conflict of erasing or eliminating his Native American culture to immerse into the lifestyle of a white teenager in a predominately white school.

As an introductory activity, students will engage in the see/think/wonder methodology to infer the artists’ purpose for the artwork. This initial activity will help scaffold students’ prior understanding and knowledge of the historical context of Native American history and the forced immersion into white culture. Therefore, after students have had ample time of using visual understanding skills to interpret the artwork, students can explore a “modern-day version” of Sherman Alexie’s image that showcases a juxtaposition of the main character’s internal identity conflict.Similar to the artwork, students will engage in the "connect, extend, and challenge" thinking activity. Students will make connections to the text and real-world connections as a culminating task. Lastly, students will discuss how it extended their thinking and a remaining challenge or wonder students still have. Using their remaining questions, this could lead to several extension activities.

Students can explore other Native American artwork in the learning lab, students can also use the "unveiling stories" strategy to learn more about the Carlisle school. The history of the Carlisle school connects and relates with the novel by adding historical context. Lastly, students can engage in teacher-made or student-made gallery walks using other Native American artwork or imagery to support the reading process of the paired text.


Jacquie Lapple
16
 

Depictions of Children

Viewers will consider how images of children have changed over the past 300 years. Artwork selections include a large variety of individual and group portraits of both male and female sitters/subjects in a variety of styles for the purpose of analyzing the elements of portraiture (expression, pose, clothing, hairstyle, setting, objects, etc...) in order to help students gain a better understanding of social norms in the context of place and time. This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018Learning to look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Michelle Zimmerman
60
 

SOB, SOB and Homegoing: Black Representation and Identity in African and African American Art

The collection contains work from an SAAM summer session from 2018 inspired by SOB,SOB by Marshall and is centered around the reading of Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. It is meant to be a resource for teachers seeking to consider identity critically, incorporate meaningful diversity, and promote the importance of complex representation. #SAAMteach

Loren Lee
76
 

Electronic Superhighway: The Infrastructure of American Stories

A collection of art about how Americans construct their collective spaces.

John Allen
117
 

Inlaid Imagery: A Different Way to Draw through Korean Ceramics

This collection briefly introduces the art of incision and inlay in ancient Korean ceramics as a unique method of creating imagery that can be both meaningful and beautiful. While these traditional ceramics known as celadon were not unique to Korea, as a functional art form they did reach new heights of craft and expression during the Goryeo Dynasty (935-1392) thanks to design innovations. One of the most notable modifications made by Korean potters was the practice of cutting away some clay (incising) and adding a different type (inlay), to create contrasts, patterns, shapes, images, and other visual and physical effects. 

As with other kinds of traditional Korean visual art, the images created on ceramics include familiar Korean folks motifs such as animals, plants, or elements of nature that carried specific aspirational meanings. This collection also provides examples of such folk images portrayed in ceramics, and explores some examples of such symbolism, as an inspiration for users to create their own images in a creative workshop. 

In terms of end goals, this collection will:

  1. Introduce Korean traditional incised ceramics 
  2. Help users learn to recognize the technique
  3. Introduce Korean folk images portrayed in such ceramics, and their symbolic nature
  4. Inspire users to create their own Korean folk-style image
Adam Wojciechowicz
16
97-120 of 374 Collections